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BEGIN EXPORTED REFERENCES




RT Journal
ID 2920
T1 'We have to be able to recover our costs'
JF Frontline (India's National Magazine)
YR 2004
VO 21
IS 2
AB Interview with Prof. Martin Blume, Editor-in-Chief, American 
Physical Society. In 1996, Professor Martin Blume, a condensed matter 
physicist at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the United States 
took over as the Editor-in-Chief of the American Physical Society 
(APS). It was growth time for electronic publishing and the Internet, 
which were establishing themselves as the preferred modes of scholarly 
communication. The APS, which publishes the prestigious physics 
journals Physical Review and Physical Review Letters, had to adapt and 
evolve to the digital age.
NO ID: 788
UL http://www.frontlineonnet.com/fl2102/stories/20040130001308200.htm

RT Journal
ID 2921
T1 How to skate on the edge of the paradigm. . . . . and keep from 
falling off: an interview with Nicholas J. Turro
JF The Spectrum
YR 2004
VO 17
IS 1
SP 4
OP 9, 34
AB Library use is exremely important for chemistry students. The 
Spectrum: Your students say that one of the most valuable lessons 
they’ve learned in the Turro Lab involves the importance of “mastering” 
the chemical literature. What’s your definition of mastery? Turro: You 
can never totally master the literature. But there are certain levels 
of mastery that are essential and are straightforwardly achievable by 
all students. In fact, there is a certain attitude that students should 
take with respect to the literature. Most students don’t fully 
appreciate the importance of this attitude until they discover that 
somebody knows something that they themselves should have known and 
could have known if they had studied the literature properly. The basic 
attitude required is that you should be familiar with enough of the 
literature so that you never unnecessarily repeat work published in the 
past and that you should be aware in broad strokes of what has been 
published in the past. Due to their dependence on the web, students 
don’t seem to know how to use a library effectively any more. Rather 
than go to the library, they go to the web, and punch in a few key 
words. Something comes up or something doesn’t come up. And to them, 
that’s it. If it doesn’t come up, it doesn’t exist. In a talk a few 
years ago, you quoted a student who summarized the Turro Corollary on 
mastering the chemical literature in one sentence: “Three months in the 
laboratory can save a couple of hours in the library.”
NO ID: 793
UL 
http://www.bgsu.edu/departments/photochem/research/spring2004spectrum.p
df

RT Journal
ID 2922
T1 Access all areas: Scientific publishing is having to change rapidly 
to respond to growing pressure for free access to published research
JF Economist
YR 2004
FD August 7
VO 372
IS 8387
SP 64
OP 65
AB IN A letter penned in 1676, Isaac Newton famously wrote, “If I have 
seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.” Although it 
is debatable whether Newton was being modest or making a barbed comment 
towards his correspondent (a competitor of short stature) the phrase 
epitomises views of how science progresses—with the speedy and open 
publishing of discoveries so that others may make use of them to push 
back the frontiers of human understanding. For centuries, printed 
journals destined for university libraries have been the focus of this 
publishing activity. The winds of change, though, are sweeping through 
these quiet and dusty corridors. Because of the internet, cost and 
distance are no longer barriers to providing the results of research to 
more than just a restricted and privileged few. This is leading people 
to ask why those results are not, in fact, freely available to all.
NO ID: 795
UL http://www.economist.com/science/displayStory.cfm?story_id=3061258

RT Report
ID 2918
T1 Marketing Special Libraries - Bibliography
YR 2002
FD April 10,2002
AB Your SLA password is needed to open this bibliography.
NO ID: 295
PP Washington, DC
T3 Tertiary Marketing Special Libraries - Bibliography
UL http://www.sla.org/content/memberonly/electrinfo/market.cfm

RT Journal
ID 2919
T1 Backlog of Mathematics Research Journals
JF Notices of the American Mathematical Society
YR 2002
VO 49
IS 8
SP 924
OP 927
NO ID: 665
UL http://www.ams.org/notices/200208/noti-backlog-02.pdf

RT Journal
ID 2917
T1 Help! The data are coming
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 1999
VO 399
IS 6736
SP 505
AB Some branches of science have learnt how to cope with the huge 
amounts of information. Biologists haven't. There is a dearth of 
essential skills which is now starting to be taken seriously.
NO ID: 241

RT Journal
ID 2916
T1 Citation data: the wrong impact?
JF Nature neuroscience
JO Nat.Neurosci.
YR 1998
VO 1
IS 8
SP 641
OP 642
AB Editorial -- Every September, a ripple of excitement passes through 
the scientific community as the Institute of Scientific Information 
(ISI) publishes its latest set of impact factors, in which some six 
thousand journals are ranked according to the number of citations they 
received in the previous year. The release of these results triggers 
elation or gloom in editorial offices around the world, but for many 
scientists it is no more than light entertainment, the scientific 
equivalent of tabloid gossip. For others, however, it represents 
something more serious, because their career prospects are increasingly 
affected by the impact factors of the journals in which they publish. 
Although bibliometric data undoubtedly have the potential to reveal 
significant insights into the quality of scientific work, they are also 
susceptible to abuse. It is therefore worth examining in some detail 
how they are derived and how they are now being applied.
NO ID: 758
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/neuro/journal/v1/n8/full/nn1298_641.html

RT Newspaper Article
ID 2915
T1 Einstein Sees Boston; Fails on Edison Test
JF New York Times
YR 1921
SP 18
AB This is the article where Einstein is asked - What is the speed of 
sound? He could not reply off-hand. He did not carry such information 
in his mind but it was readily available in text books.
NO ID: 264
T2 New York Times
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 2895
A1 Abbasi,Kamran
A1 al.,et
T1 Four futures for scientific and medical publishing
JF BMJ
JO BMJ
YR 2002
VO 325
IS 7378
SP 1472
OP 1475
AB It is impossible to predict the future, particularly at times of 
great change. We are moving now from the industrial age to the 
information age, and we are probably nearer the beginning than the end 
of that change. Imagining scenarios is a way to think about the future 
and so prepare for it. Some things seem to be important for all of 
these futures.
NO ID: 796
UL http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/325/7378/1472

RT Book, Whole
ID 2896
A1 Abel,Richard E.
A1 Newlin,Lyman W.
T1 Scholarly publishing : books, journals, publishers, and libraries in 
the twentieth century
YR 2002
AB Against the Grain special Millennial Issue -- Growth of Printed 
Literature in the Twentieth Century / Albert Henderson 1 2 
Introduction: The Change of Book and Journal Infrastructure: Two 
Publishers, Consolidation, and Niche Publishers / Richard E. Abel 25 
Pt. 1 Technology in Publishing: A Century of Progress / Peter Adams 29 
Pt. 2 Differentiation of Publishing by Class of Publication / Richard 
Zeldin 41 3 Growth and Change in Trade Publishing: What I Learned at 
the Library / Sam Vaughan 47 4 Growth and Change in Trade Book 
Publishing: What I Learned from the Numbers / Stephanie Oda 63 5 
Textbook Publishing / Robert J. R. Follett 95 6 University Press 
Publishing in the United States / Peter Givler 107 7 Creative Role of 
the Professional or STM Publisher / John Francis Dill 121 8 Diversity 
and the Growth of Serious/Scholarly/Scientific Journals / Albert 
Henderson 133 9 From Bibliotheque to Omnitheque / Allen B. Veaner 163 
10 Development of Public Libraries / Barbara Carol Dean 179 11 Growth 
of Scholarly and Scientific Libraries / Hendrik Edelman 193 12 
Appearance and Growth of Computer and Electronic Products in Libraries 
/ Ralph M. Shoffner 209 13 Economic Crisis in Libraries: Causes and 
Effects / Michael Gorman 257 14 Impact of the Library Budget Crisis on 
Scholarly Publishing / Jack G. Goellner 273 15 Place of Scholarly and 
Scientific Libraries in an Increasingly and More Widespread Competitive 
Information Knowledge Marketplace / Charles Hamaker 277 Conclusion / 
Richard E. Abel, Lyman W. Newlin 293 Coda / Katina Strauch, Bruce 
Strauch 301
NO ID: 803
PB John Wiley & Sons, Inc
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0471219290

RT Journal
ID 2897
A1 Abels,Eileen G.
A1 Liebscher,Peter
A1 Denman,Daniel W.
T1 Factors that influence the use of electronic networks by science and 
engineering faculty at small institutions. Part I. Queries
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1996
VO 47
IS 2
SP 146
OP 158
AB Adoption of an NSFnet connection at an institutional level is a 
costly undertaking. The decision to connect requires a hierarchy of 
subordinate decisions relating to the network connection. If any group 
of faculty resist adopting and using the network, the potential 
benefits of the network and its services will not be realized for the 
institution as a whole. A study was undertaken to explore factors that 
influence the adoption and use of electronic networks and network 
services by science and engineering faculty in small universities and 
colleges. Adoption was measured by the dichotomous variable of use and 
non-use for the network and for five individual services. Intensity of 
use was selected as a measure of use. In general, factors found to 
influence the adoption of the network are different from those that 
influence the intensity of use and the number of services used. For 
this reason, different actions are necessary to enhance adoption and 
increase use. Physical access to a networked workstation seems to be 
the biggest determinant to adoption of the network. Expanding training 
programs to include a broader audience and a broader scope will 
increase use.
NO ID: 249
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/57704/START

RT Journal
ID 2898
A1 Abram,Stephen
T1 Shift Happens: Ten Key Trends in our Profession and Ten Strategies 
for Success
JF Serials Librarian
YR 2000
VO 38
IS 1/2
SP 41
OP 59
AB Author abstract - "A discussion of the future of the information 
professions, their work, and professional environments. The author 
identifies ten trends in today's world and ten strategies for success 
in the future. He explores the impact of these trends on marketing our 
libraries, our technology and ourselves."
NO ID: 293

RT Journal
ID 2899
A1 Abt,Helmut A.
T1 Astronomical Publications in the near future
JF Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
YR 2000
VO 112
IS 777
SP 1417
OP 1420
AB A study is made of the number of astronomical papers, number of 
pages, mean paper lengths, authors per paper, and international 
authorship in recent decades, and this produces predictions for the 
coming decade or two. The first significant result is that the number 
of published research papers worldwide shows no abrupt changes due to 
increased technical and scientific capabilities, such as major 
increases in equipment sensitivity, new telescopes, breakthroughs in 
computing and publication techniques, or our ability to generate huge 
amounts of data. The second major result is that the number of papers 
is a function only of the number of astronomers.
NO ID: 216
UL 
http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/PASP/journal/issues/v112n777/200107/20
0107.web.pdf

RT Journal
ID 2900
A1 Abt,Helmut A.
T1 The Most Frequently Cited Astronomical Papers Published During the 
Past Decade
JF Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
YR 2000
VO 32
IS 3
SP 937
OP 941
AB From the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), we obtained the 
list of the 100 astronomical papers published worldwide in 1988-1997 
that received the highest numbers of citations in the same interval.
NO ID: 230
UL http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/v32n3/abt.pdf

RT Journal
ID 2903
A1 Ackerson,Linda G.
T1 Is Age an Appropriate Criterion for Moving Journals to Storage?
JF Collection Management
YR 2001
VO 26
IS 3
SP 63
OP 76
AB Past studies have found that scientists tend to use the older, 
rather than the newer, literature of related disciplines to support 
their research. If literature is shared between diciplines with 
different usage patterns, should age be used to select journals for 
storage? The author performed a synchronous citation study to examine 
literature use in physical chemistry. Her conclusions run counter to 
the prior research.
NO ID: 355

RT Journal
ID 2902
A1 Ackerson,Linda G.
T1 Visualizing the configuration of scientific literature: a study of 
disciplinary relationships
JF Reference & User Services Quarterly
YR 1999
VO 39
IS 1
SP 43
OP 52
K1 Periodicals, Scientific and technical. Citation analysis. journals
NO ID: 196

RT Journal
ID 2901
A1 Ackerson,Linda G.
T1 Basing reference service on scientific communication: toward a more 
effective model for science graduate students
JF RQ
YR 1996
FD Winter
VO 36
IS 2
SP 248
OP 260
AB Bibliographic instruction -- Graduate students. Research techniques 
-- Teaching. Science students.
NO BLIB97005307 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0033-7072 article 
feature article; ID: 462

RT Journal
ID 2904
A1 Adam,David
T1 The Counting House
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2002
VO 415
IS 6873
SP 726
OP 729
AB Scientists' work is often evaluated using citation statistics 
compiled by a company called the ISI. But how useful and reliable are 
the data? David Adam gets the measure of citation analysis. There are, 
it is said, three types of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics. Many 
scientists, who find their work assessed through attempts to gauge how 
often it is cited in the scientific literature, would surely subscribe 
to that view. Citation analysis, in the hands of non-experts, can be an 
extremely blunt instrument. What's more, the specialists in the field 
have found that raw citation data often contain errors.
NO ID: 704
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v415/n6873/full/415726a_fs.html

RT Journal
ID 2905
A1 Adam,Nabil
A1 Awerbuch,Baruch
A1 Slonim,Jacob
A1 Wegner,Peter
A1 Yesha,Yelena
T1 Globalizing business, education, culture through the Internet
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 27 pages.
SP 115
OP 121
K1 Internet
K1 Globalization
K1 Education
K1 Culture
K1 Electronic commerce
K1 Technological change
K1 Man machine interaction
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (9180) International
K1 (5250) Telecommunications systems
K1 (1200) Social policy
AB Computer technology supports globalization by radically changing the 
economics of communication, so geographic proximity is even less a 
requirement for effective collaboration and business interaction. 
Moreover, globalization of computer technology makes possible new forms 
of technical and social organizations that influence the efficiency of 
business enterprises as well as the quality of life of ordinary 
citizens. Globalization occurs at both the national and the 
international levels. The technology of globalization is driven by 
commercial incentives. Electronic commerce is a major component of the 
emerging global open marketplace. Education is the world's potentially 
largest information industry. Globalization allows new methods of 
packaging and delivering educational products. Underlying globalization 
is a set of networking technologies for human-computer interaction. The 
Internet can be a tool for creating common values and respect in 
democratic societies. However, Internet regulation is needed for many 
reasons, such as for standards and security.
NO ID: 104

RT Journal
ID 2906
A1 Adams,Jill U.
T1 How to write a business plan
JF The Scientist
YR 2004
FD July 19
SP 52
OP 53
AB Business and science make one of the riskiest marriages around. 
Still, many MBA's and Ph.D's take this plunge because of the potential 
for blockbuster profits.
NO ID: 794
UL http://www.the-scientist.com/2004/7/19/52/1

RT Journal
ID 2907
A1 Agosto,Denise E.
T1 A model of young people's decision-making in using the Web
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2002
VO 24
IS 4
SP 311
OP 341
AB This article offers a theoretical model of the criteria young people 
use to evaluate websites. The model combines the concepts of personal 
preferences, object engagement characteristics, human processing 
constraints, and contextual constraints to predict a young person's 
evaluation decision. The qualitative methodology used to gather data 
for the development and testing of this model included website 
evaluation sessions and group interviews with 11 young female students. 
Data analysis took the form of iterative pattern coding using QSR 
NUD*IST Vivo qualitative data analysis software. Data analysis 
uncovered strong support for the theoretical and empirical models. 
Related implications for website designers are discussed, with an 
emphasis on the importance of enabling users to modify website design 
to satisfy their personal preferences. Related implications for 
librarians and teachers are also discussed, with an emphasis on the 
importance of teaching young people to become more critical users of 
the Web. [Copyright 2002 Elsevier]
NO ID: 524

RT Journal
ID 2908
A1 Agres,Ted
T1 US faces science shortage: NSB says fewer students, global 
competition, visa restrictions forging 'troubling decline'
JF The Scientist
YR 2004
AB A “troubling decline” in the number of US citizens training to 
become scientists and engineers is creating an “emerging and critical 
problem” for the United States, according to a new report -- 
http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/nsb0407/start.htm by the by the National 
Science Board, the independent government panel that oversees and sets 
policy for the National Science Foundation (NSF).
NO ID: 785
UL http://www.biomedcentral.com/news/20040506/02

RT Journal
ID 2909
A1 Akin,Lynn K.
T1 Marketing Principles, Guaranteed
JF Public Libraries
YR 2001
VO 40
IS 6
SP 350
OP 353
AB Provides a plethora of ideas for ways that public libraries can 
better meet the services listed on their mission statements.
NO ID: 294

RT Journal
ID 2910
A1 Alvarez,Pedro
A1 Escalona,Isabel
A1 Pulgarín-Guerrero,Antonio
T1 What is wrong with obsolescence?
JF J Am Soc Inf Sci
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.
YR 2000
FD July
VO 51
IS 9
SP 812
OP 815
K1 Descriptor: Obsolescence of books, periodicals, etc. -- Evaluation.
K1 Citation analysis.
K1 Periodicals -- Selection.
K1 Periodicals, Physics
AB The growth of scientific output in recent years has meant that fewer 
libraries are able to offer the entire range of journals, with the 
others being forced to make a selection. The objective of the present 
work is to describe criteria to regulate the selection of these 
journals to provide the researcher with the information that is most 
being used in research. One form of quantifying this information is by 
way of the citations that papers receive over a period of time 
following their publication. Obsolescence, expressed in terms of an 
annual aging factor, does not reflect the real behaviour of most 
papers. An alternative is the use of topicality, considered as a latent 
variable, with the Rasch model as the measuring instrument. We 
considered 45 physics journals, and found the results of applying the 
Rasch model to be more satisfactory than those obtained with the annual 
aging factor.
NO BLIB00009967 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0002-8231 Details: 
bibl tab. article feature article; ID: 492

RT Journal
ID 2911
A1 Alvarez,Pedro
A1 Pulgarín,Antonio
T1 The diffusion of scientific journals analyzed through citations
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1997
VO 48
IS 10
SP 953
OP 958
K1 Rasch model, physics journals, ISI Science Citation index, journal 
citation reports, 1994, 10 year distribution
AB A method is described for analyzing the diffusion of scientific 
journals, using the Rasch model as the measuring instrument. It is 
applied to the 10-year distribution of citations to journals of the 
Subject Category Physics by year of publication of cited articles with 
data obtained from the SCI Journal Citation Reports of ISI for the year 
1994. Diffusion in a scientific field would be regarded as the 
dissemination of knowledge, channeled through citations that are 
distributed over different periods of time and propagated by means of 
scientific journals: here it is considered to be a latent variable 
defined by a particular set of items (the citations made in different 
time periods), and the Rasch model is used as an instrument for 
measuring that variable.
NO ID: 239

RT Journal
ID 2912
A1 Amin,M.
A1 Mabe,M.
T1 Impact Factors: use and abuse
JF Perspectives in Publishing
YR 2000
IS 1
SP 1
OP 6
AB The ISI® Journal Citation Reports (JCR®) impact factor has moved in 
recent years from an obscure bibliometric indicator to become the chief 
quantitative measure of the quality of a journal, its research papers, 
the researchers who wrote those papers, and even the institution they 
work in. This pamphlet looks at the limitations of the impact factor, 
how it can and how it should not be used.
NO ID: 723
UL http://www.elsevier.com/framework_editors/pdfs/Perspectives1.pdf

RT Journal
ID 2913
A1 Anderson,Nancy D.
A1 Dilcher,K.
A1 Rovnyak,J.
T1 Mathematics Research Libraries at the End of the Twentieth Century
JF Notices of the American Mathematical Society
YR 1997
VO 44
SP 1469
OP 1472
NO ID: 125
UL http://wsrv.clas.virginia.edu/~jlr5m/survey/survey.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 2914
A1 Anderson,Nancy D.
A1 Pausch,Lois M.
T1 Guide to Library Service in Mathematics: the Non-Trivial Mathematics 
Librarian
YR 1993
K1 math librarianship
NO Z765.M37 G85 1993; ID: 260
PB JAI Press
PP Greenwich, CT
SN 1-55938745-9

RT Journal
ID 2923
A1 Apt,Krzysztof R.
T1 One more revolution to make: Free scientific publishing
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 2001
VO 44
IS 5
SP 25
AB Declining costs of access to information have been a crucial factor 
in the progress of humanity. Thanks to the Internet it is now feasible 
to provide and properly organize a freely available scientific 
knowledge. It is the scientists' responsibility to work toward this 
goal. We can achieve it only by changing our attitudes toward 
scientific publishing. Computer scientists are in a position to create 
new, free high-quality journals and contribute in this way to a free 
dissemination of scientific knowledge. We should draw our inspiration 
from the success of the GNU project (www.gnu.org), started by Richard 
Stallman and joined by leading programmers, the aim of which is to 
develop free software as a viable alternative to commercially produced 
software. We should also listen to mathematicians and economists [1, 2] 
who convincingly argue for the creation of new inexpensive mathematics 
and economics journals that would supersede the overpriced ones.
NO ID: 767
UL http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/374308.374325

RT Journal
ID 2924
A1 Armstrong,William W.
T1 Communication in the Sciences as Seen through Physics and Chemistry: 
A Look at the Complex Relationship between Author, Publisher, and 
Distributor as They Relate to the Reader
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2005
VO 66
IS 2
SP 98
OP 114
AB Writing has long been the primary means of communicating in the 
sciences, yet the nature of the written word is rapidly changing as we 
enter a new era of electronic communications and virtual realities. 
This article examines some of these changes, particularly as they 
pertain to the disciplines of chemistry and physics and, most 
important, within the scope of the complex relationship between 
authors, publishers, and distributors (distributors in this case being 
academic libraries). This examination involves looking at changes 
within this triumvirate, the relationship each of the three has with 
the other, and ramifications of the changes as we peer into the near 
future. The three members of the triumvirate are intricately and 
inextricably bound together, and problems that occur within any one 
component will inevitably affect the others, imperiling the 
relationship between writer and reader. Such potential problems are 
brought to light in this article.
NO ID: 667
UL 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crljournal/backissues2005a/crlmarc
h05/crlmarab05.htm

RT Journal
ID 2925
A1 Arte,Assunta
T1 The management of the scientific information environment: the role 
of the research library Web site at the CNR
JF Online Information Review
YR 2001
FD 2001article feature article
VO 25
IS 2
SP 88
OP 93
K1 Descriptor: Internet -- Scientific and technical libraries.
K1 Internet -- Italy.
K1 Named Corp: Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (Italy)
NO ID: 276

RT Journal
ID 2927
A1 Association of Research Libraries
A1 Association of American Universities
A1 Roundtable,Pew Higher Education
T1 To Publish and Perish
JF Policy Perspectives
YR 1998
VO 7
IS 4 (March)
SP 1
OP 12
AB This issues is about the challenge of maintaining access to 
significant research and scholarship at a time when both the volume and 
price of information has increased nearly three times in the last 
decade alone.
NO ID: 127

RT Report
ID 2926
A1 Association,Computing Research
T1 Best Practices Memo: Evaluating Computer Scientists and Engineers 
For Promotion and Tenure
YR 1999
AB The evaluation of computer science and engineering faculty for 
promotion and tenure has generally followed the dictate "publish or 
perish," where "publish" has had its standard academic meaning of 
"publish in archival journals" [Academic Careers, 94]. Relying on 
journal publications as the sole demonstration of scholarly 
achievement, especially counting such publications to determine whether 
they exceed a prescribed threshold, ignores significant evidence of 
accomplishment in computer science and engineering. For example, 
conference publication is preferred in the field, and computational 
artifacts —software, chips, etc. —are a tangible means of conveying 
ideas and insight. Obligating faculty to be evaluated by this 
traditional standard handicaps their careers, and indirectly harms the 
field. This document describes appropriate evidence of academic 
achievement in computer science and engineering.
NO ID: 816
T3 Tertiary Best Practices Memo: Evaluating Computer Scientists and 
Engineers For Promotion and Tenure
UL http://www.cra.org/reports/tenure_review.html

RT Journal
ID 2928
A1 Atkinson,Ross
T1 Contingency and contradiction: the place(s) of the library at the 
dawn of the new millennium
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2001
VO 52
IS 1
SP 3
OP 11
AB Librarianship has become preoccupied, perhaps to a point of 
obsession, with its own future. There seems to be a growing sense that 
change is now moving at such a rate that steering may have ceased to be 
an option. But that is all the more reason to stop now for a moment - 
balanced, as we are, on the cusp between millennia - to reaffirm, or 
redefine, the core values of information services, and to consider how 
those values can be most effectively fulfilled in the intermediate 
future. The aim of this article will be to suggest answers to two 
questions. First, what should be the primary purpose of information 
services in general and libraries in particular as we enter the new 
millennium? Second, assuming such a purpose, what array of services 
should the library be prepared to provide? While these questions will 
be approached mainly from the academic library perspective, much of 
what is said should be applicable to all types of libraries. The 
division in any case between certain types of libraries - especially 
public and academic - is becoming increasingly problematic and 
questionable from both the service and the economic perspectives. 
Although initial efforts to combine public and academic libraries have 
predictably experienced major political and methodological challenges 
(see Flagg, [1999]), we should, nevertheless, persist in those efforts 
eventually to bring about such a merger.
NO ID: 713
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/76502085/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 2929
A1 Augustine,Susan
A1 Greene,Courtney
T1 Discovering How Students Search a Library Web Site: A Usability Case 
Study
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2002
VO 63
IS 4
SP 354
OP 365
AB Examines the effects of Internet search engine on the way students 
search library Web pages. Frequency of student use of the internal 
search engine of the library Web site; Basis of library Web site 
development; Discussion on the difficulty of students in interpreting 
library terminology.
NO ID: 547

RT Journal
ID 2930
A1 Bachrach,Steven
A1 Berry,R. Stephen
A1 Blume,Martin
A1 von Foerster,Thomas
A1 Fowler,Alexander
A1 Ginsparg,Paul
A1 Heller,Stephen
A1 Kestner,Neil
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
A1 Okerson,Ann
A1 Wigington,Ron
A1 Moffat,Anne
T1 Who should own scientific papers?
JF Science
JO Science
YR 1998
VO 281
IS 5382
SP 1459
AB Publishing the results of scientific research was, for many years, a 
symbiotic interaction between researchers and publishers, because the 
most effective way scientists could disseminate their results was 
through journals, produced by professional societies and independent 
publishers. Electronic communication has created new ways to distribute 
such results and is forcing researchers and publishers to reassess the 
old procedures and consider new possibilities as we learn to use the 
Internet. Now, not only can authors easily disseminate their results, 
but networked readers can have cheap, fast access to more scientific 
literature and have it in a form that facilitates its use in their own 
research.
NO ID: 89

RT Journal
ID 2931
A1 Baker,George H.
T1 Relation of Seminary and Department Libraries to the General 
University Library
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 1898
IS vol. 23
SP 103
OP 106
K1 departmental libraries, departmental library
NO ID: 59

RT Journal
ID 2932
A1 Baker,Nicholson
T1 The author vs. the library : letter from San Francisco
JF New Yorker
YR 1996
IS Oct. 14
SP 50
OP 62
AB He complains about the way that the San francisco public library has 
been organized. He does not like it that they have gotten rid of their 
card catalog.
NO ID: 60

RT Journal
ID 2933
A1 Ball,Philip
T1 Index aims for fair ranking of scientists
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2005
VO 436
IS 900
SP 18
AB 'H-index' sums up publication record. The election procedures of 
scientific academies are often seen as opaque, clubby and capricious. 
But Jorge Hirsch, a physicist at the University of California, San 
Diego, may have found a way to silence those complaints, by inventing a 
measure of research achievement that, he says, is transparent, unbiased 
and very hard to rig. His 'h-index' depends on both the number of a 
scientist's publications, and their impact on his or her peers. As well 
as determining membership of scientific societies, Hirsch suggests that 
the method could inform funding or tenure decisions.
NO ID: 829

RT Book, Section
ID 2934
A1 Banholzer,Gordon S.
T1 The Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS): the role of 
libraries in development and implementation
YR 1995
SP 89
OP 91
AB Information systems -- Special subjects -- Geology. Cooperation -- 
Government libraries
NO ID: 424
A2 Haner,Barbara E.
A2 O'Donnell,Jim
T2 Changing gateways: the impact of technology on geoscience 
information exchange - Geoscience Information Society. Meeting (29th 
:1994 :Seattle, Wash.)
PB Geoscience Information Society

RT Journal
ID 2935
A1 Banks,Julie
T1 Weeding Book Collections in the Age of the Internet
JF Collection Building
YR 2002
VO 21
IS 3
SP 113
OP 119
AB The weeding project at Southeast Missouri State University presented 
an opportunity to identify different variables, i.e. shelf level, book 
jackets, added entries, and untraced series, that impacted a book's 
circulation behavior and to consider the relationship between 
circulation and the Internet/online database activity. Using the 
political science collection, the investigator found that shelf level 
has the strongest impact on circulation among the variables studied, 
but the Internet and electronic reference databases have an even 
greater influence on circulation. Surprisingly, one of the conclusions 
was that 61 percent of the political science collection either 
circulated only once or never circulated. It is argued that because of 
the pressures the Internet and electronic reference databases are 
placing on book collections and their use it is more important than 
ever to identify new collection development strategies to pinpoint 
which titles will be used.
NO ID: 353

RT Journal
ID 2936
A1 Barschall,Henry H.
T1 The Cost-Effectiveness of Physics Journals
JF Physics Today
JO Phys Today
YR 1988
IS July
SP 56
OP 59
AB A survey of more than 200 journals shows that their cost-
effectiveness, as measured by the ratio of the cost per printed 
character to the frequency with which articles are cited, varies by 
three orders of magnitude.
NO ID: 121

RT Journal
ID 2937
A1 Barschall,Henry H.
A1 Arrington,J. R.
T1 Cost of Physics Journals: A Survey
JF Bulletin of the American Physical Society
YR 1988
VO 33
IS 7
SP 1437
OP 1447
AB A survey of more than 200 journals shows that their cost-
effectiveness, as measured by the ratio of the cost per printed 
character to the frequency with which articles are cited, varies by 
three orders of magnitude.
NO ID: 120

RT Journal
ID 2938
A1 Bartsch,Robert A.
A1 Tydlacka,Bridgette L.
T1 Student perceptions (and the reality) of percentage of journal 
articles found through full-text databases
JF Research Strategies
YR 2003
VO 19
IS 2
SP 128
OP 134
AB Researchers [Coll. Res. Libr. 63 (2002) 515] have theorized that 
content and functionality affect whether people choose to retrieve 
journal articles from full-text electronic databases or from print 
copies. Full-text databases are often rated higher in functionality 
(i.e., convenience). This article examines why students may also 
believe that full-text databases have superior content. In addition, 
psychology students were asked what percentage of relevant psychology 
articles was available online and in print at their library and a 
neighboring institution. Students greatly overestimated how many 
articles were available online. The paper further discusses when 
students will exclusively choose full-text databases and what 
librarians can do to help combat the problem of exclusively using full-
text databases.
NO ID: 662
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resstr.2004.03.002

RT Journal
ID 2939
A1 Bates,Marcia J.
T1 Learning about the information seeking of interdisciplinary scholars 
and students
JF Library Trends
YR 1996
VO 44
IS 2
SP 155
OP 164
AB Discusses the information needs and information seeking behavior of 
scholars and students in interdisciplinary fields. Suggestion that such 
fields may require striking and distinctive information seeking 
adaptations by researchers; Description of the kinds of research needed 
at both basic and applied levels, with respect to both scholars and 
students.
NO ID: 367

RT Journal
ID 2940
A1 Bayer,Bernard
A1 Kilgour,Frederick G.
T1 Scholarly use of reference information in physics journals
JF J Am Soc Inf Sci
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.
YR 1996
FD Feb.
VO 47
IS 2
SP 170
OP 172
K1 Descriptor: Periodicals, Physics.
K1 Citation analysis.
K1 Use studies -- Serial publications
NO BLIB96002997 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0002-8231 Details: 
bibl. article feature article; ID: 493

RT Journal
ID 2941
A1 Bazillion,Richard, J.
T1 Planning the academic library of the future
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2001
VO 1
IS 2
SP 151
OP 160
AB Designing an academic library is a form of scholarship because the 
building embodies certain basic principles of modern librarianship. New 
libraries then serve as "teaching and learning instruments" that 
encourage students to develop the electronic research skills demanded 
by an information society. Design considerations determine how well a 
library will be able to fulfill this mission.
NO ID: 572
UL 
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v001/1.2b
azillion.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 2942
A1 Bazirjian,Rosann
A1 Speck,Vicky
T1 Charleston Conference proceedings 2002
YR 2003
SP 212
AB Here are some interesting articles -- Electronic Journal Use: A 
Glimpse into the Future with Information from the Past and Present / 
Carol Tenopir, Donald W. King 36 Implications of Electronic Journal 
Usage Statistics: Conjecture in the OhioLINK Environment / Kent 
Mulliner 42 Project COUNTER: A Progress Report / Peter T. Shepherd 52 
Caltech Collection of Open Digital Archives (CODA) / John McDonald 61 
Dspace and Digital Archives / Eileen Gifford Fenton 65 E-Journals 
Pricing Redux: Perspectives from the Field / Bruce Lyons 71 E-Journal 
Pricing Redux: Perspectives from the Field / Ann Okerson Pricing Models 
for Electronic Products - As Tangled As Ever? / Stephen Rhind-Tutt 
Return of Ownership: An Optimistic, Cautionary Tale About Scholarly 
Communication, Digital Libraries, and Changing Funding Models for 
Universities / Joyce L. Ogburn Collection Development Issues in Health 
Sciences Libraries: A Few Bites (Bytes) into E-Book, E-Journal, and 
Database Trends / Ramune Kubilius Connecting Citations and Full Text / 
Walt Crawford Electronic Theses and Dissertations: Issues and Options / 
Rebecca L. Mugridge, L. Suzanne Kellerman
NO ID: 732
A2 Strauch,Katina
PB Libraries Unlimited
PP Westport, CT
SN 1591581028
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1591581028

RT Journal
ID 2943
A1 Belefant-Miller,Helen
A1 King,Donald W.
T1 How, what, and why science faculty read
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2001
VO 19
IS 2
SP 91
OP 112
K1 Use studies -- College and university libraries.
K1 Scientists -- Reading.
K1 College and university libraries -- Relations with faculty and 
curriculum.
K1 John C. Hodges Library. University of Tennessee at Knoxville
AB ABSTRACT. One part of a library use survey administered in 1993 to 
the users of the libraries of the University of Tennessee at Knoxville 
was analyzed to provide a profile of the reading behaviors of science 
faculty. The survey questions were grouped into the four steps in 
accomplishing a document reading: finding, getting, reading, and using 
a document. The science faculty tended to find their document by 
browsing. The document was generally obtained from a personalized 
subscription. Science faculty predominately read journals and books and 
read almost 50 articles a year from the journal they obtained their 
last read document from. The science faculty were mostly likely to use 
their reading for research. Science faculty appreciated the 
capabilities of electronic document transmission, but had a marked 
preference for paper transmission. Few differences were found between 
science and non-science faculty, mostly in their specific concerns for 
electronic or print transmission and in the uses of their readings.
NO ID: 409
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v19n02_08&i=2&s=J122&v=19

RT Journal
ID 2944
A1 Bell,Trudy E.
T1 Information Free-for-All
JF The Institute
YR 2005
FD March
AB If open access —a movement gaining momentum in academic publishing 
that proposes journal articles be made universally available online to 
all readers for free—becomes reality, the results could dramatically 
reshape the activities of all scholarly publishers, including the IEEE.
NO ID: 674
UL 
http://www.theinstitute.ieee.org/portal/site/tionline/index.jsp?pageID=
institute_level1_article&TheCat=2201&article=tionline/legacy/inst2005/m
ar05/3w.featureaccess.xml

RT Book, Section
ID 2945
A1 Benacchio,Leopoldo
T1 Using the Net for Education and Outreach in Astronomy
YR 2001
VO 238; 238
SP 119
OP 122
NO QB51.3.E43 A87 2000; ISBN 1583810757; ID: 342
A2 Harnden, F. R., Jr.,et al.
T2 Astronomical Data Analysis Software and Systems X: Proceedings of a 
Meeting held at Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., 12-15 November 2000
PB Astronomical Society of the Pacific
PP San Francisco
T3 ASP Conference Series
UL http://adass.org/adass/proceedings/adass00/

RT Journal
ID 2946
A1 Benedict,Marjorie A.
A1 Knee,Michael
A1 LaCroix,Mina B.
T1 Finding space for periodicals: weeding, storage and microform 
conversion
JF Collection Management
YR 1990
VO 12
IS 3/4
SP 145
OP 154
AB Established crtieria and policies to reconcile space limitations and 
collection development requirements.
NO ID: 707

RT Journal
ID 2947
A1 Benefiel,Candace R.
A1 Miller,Jeannie P.
A1 Ramirez,Diana
T1 Baseline subject competencies for the academic reference desk
JF Reference Services Review
YR 1997
VO 25
IS 10090-7324
SP 83
OP 93
K1 Sterling C. Evans Library, Texas A&M
K1 College and university libraries Reference services.
K1 Reference services Administration.
K1 Reference services Texas
NO ID: 139

RT Book, Whole
ID 2948
A1 Bennett,Scott
T1 Libraries Designed for Learning
YR 2003
SP 175
AB To what extent have recent library design projects been driven by an 
understanding of how students learn and how faculty teach? To find out, 
Yale Librarian Emeritus Scott Bennett conducted an extensive study of 
the motivations and planning methods for library renovation and 
construction projects undertaken between 1992 and 2001. His study 
entailed a Web-based survey of more than 380 institutions, and phone 
interviews with 31 library directors and chief academic officers. He 
concludes that while most of the projects are serving users well, they 
have rarely been informed by a systematic assessment of how students 
learn and faculty teach. The author suggests that planning based on 
such an assessment could equip the library to serve an even more vital 
function as a space for teaching and learning. The report is intended 
for academic librarians who are responsible for library construction 
and renovation projects, and for campus academic officers who wish to 
engage substantively with the question of how library space can advance 
the core learning and teaching missions of their institutions.
NO ID: 556
PB Council on Library and Information Resources
PP Washington, D. C.
SN 1-932326-05-7
UL http://www.clir.org/pubs/abstract/pub122abst.html

RT Journal
ID 2949
A1 Bensman,Stephen J.
A1 Wilder,Stanley J.
T1 Scientific and technical serials holdings optimization in an 
enefficient market: a LSU Serials redesign project exercise
JF Library Resources & Technical Services
JO Libr.Resour.Tech.Serv.
YR 1998
VO 42
IS 3
SP 147
OP 242
AB Science and technology are seen in this paper as dominated by stable 
elites, who tend to center around traditionally prestegious 
institutions and publish their work in U.S. association journals. 
Consequently, U.S. association serials have higher ST value, and they 
play a dominant role in internal library use but also in interlibrary 
loan. Due to their higher ST value, association journals can be sold in 
higher numbers and at cheaper prices than journals of commercial 
publishers, and this causes the ST serials market to bifurcate, with ST 
value tending to concentrate on the U.S. association serials and costs 
on the commercial ones.
NO ID: 159

RT Journal
ID 2950
A1 Berghel,Hal
T1 Cyberspace 2000: Dealing with information overload
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 25 pages.
SP 19
OP 24
K1 Information retrieval
K1 Problems
K1 Internet
K1 Search engines
K1 Brand loyalty
K1 Forecasts
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (5250) Telecommunications systems
K1 (7100) Market research
AB The mere fact that a resource is available on the Internet does not 
provide any guarantee of importance, accuracy, utility or value. 
Failure to understand this has led to the proliferation of millions of 
individual and organizational vanity home pages and document clusters. 
The most immediate cause of information overload on the Web is caused 
by the Web trying to fill the dual role of being both a private and 
public information and communication medium. The first attempt to deal 
with the information overload on the Web was the search engine. Well 
over 100 search engines have now been identified, including meta-level 
search engines. The reality is that these search engines, which help 
make cyberspace manageable, now index more chaff than wheat. Search 
engines are inherently ill-equipped to deal with the extreme 
variegation and lack of quality control over resources on the Web. A 
partial solution is to develop personal software agents, information 
customization tools, and to introduce brand names to the Internet.
NO ID: 111

RT Journal
ID 2951
A1 Besant,Larry X.
A1 Sharp,Deborah
T1 Libraries Need Relationship Marketing
JF Information Outlook
YR 2000
VO 4
IS 3
SP 17
OP 22
AB Explains the difference between traditional marketing practices and 
"relationship marketing", and how librarians could use relationship 
marketing. He defines library based relationship marketing as getting - 
and keeping - libary patronage for the long term.
NO ID: 296

RT Newspaper Article
ID 2952
A1 Birch,Douglas
T1 Lifelong pursuit of mathematical proff by professor: at 15, Enrico 
Bombiere picked up a book on number theory that introduced him to the 
fiendishly puzzling Riemann Hypothesis. He was hooked.
JF Baltimore Sun
YR 1998
FD September 30, 1998
VO A
SP 1
NO ID: 153
T2 Baltimore Sun
PP Baltimore, MD

RT Book, Section
ID 2953
A1 Bishop,Ann P.
T1 Electronic communication in engineering work
YR 1992
SP 193
OP 205
AB Information systems -- Special subjects -- Engineering. Use studies 
-- Information networks. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
NO BLIB92013338 Provider: OCLC; il. 0938734695 Related Record: 
blib92013160 English analytic; ID: 443
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (55th :1992 
:Pittsburgh, Pa.). ASIS '92 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Journal
ID 2954
A1 Bjork,Bo-Christer
A1 Turk,Ziga
T1 How Scientists Retrieve Publications: An Empirical Study of How the 
Internet Is Overtaking Paper Media
JF Journal of Electronic Publishing
YR 2000
VO 6
IS 2
AB The current mainstream scientific-publication process has so far 
been only marginally affected by the possibilities offered by the 
Internet, despite some pioneering attempts with free electronic-only 
journals and electronic preprint archives. Additional electronic 
versions of traditional paper journals for which one needs a 
subscription are not a solution. A clear trend, for young researchers 
in particular, is to go around subscription barriers (both for paper 
and electronic material) and rely almost exclusively on what they can 
find free on the Internet, which often includes working versions posted 
on the home pages of the authors. A survey of how scientists retrieve 
publications was conducted in February 2000, aimed at measuring to what 
extent the opportunities offered by the Internet are already changing 
the scientific information exchange and how researchers feel about 
this. This paper presents the results based on 236 replies to an 
extensive Web-based questionnaire, which was announced to around 3,000 
researchers in the domains of construction information technology and 
construction management.
NO ID: 413
UL http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/06-02/bjork.html

RT Journal
ID 2955
A1 Block,Marylaine
T1 The Secret of Library Marketing: Make Yourself Indispensable
JF American Libraries
JO Am.Libr.
YR 2001
VO 32
IS 8
SP 48
OP 50
AB Recommends that libraries communicate more effectively and build 
relationsips with reporters, leaders of local government, business 
leaders, and others.
NO ID: 297

RT Book, Section
ID 2956
A1 Blume,Martin
T1 The Physical Review and electronic publishing
YR 2000
NO ID: 232
A2 Teich,Albert H.
A2 Nelson,Stephen D.
A2 McEnaney,Ceilia
A2 Lita,Stephen J.
T2 AAAS Science and Technology Policy Yearbook
PB Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, American 
Association for the Advancement of Science
PP Washington, DC
UL http://www.aaas.org/spp/yearbook/2000/ch21.pdf

RT Book, Section
ID 2957
A1 Bonzi,Susan
A1 Day,Donald L.
T1 Faculty productivity as a function of cohort group, discipline, and 
academic age
YR 1991
SP 267
OP 275
K1 Descriptor: Scholarly publishing -- Evaluation.
K1 Citation analysis.
K1 Named Corp: Syracuse University
AB This is a study of 411 senior faculty members from 24 academic 
disciplines at Syracuse University.
NO BLIB92006846 Provider: OCLC; charts. 0938734563 Related Record: 
blib92006375 English analytic; ID: 451
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (54th :1991 
:Washington, D.C.). ASIS '91 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Journal
ID 2958
A1 Borgman,Christine L.
T1 Where is the librarian in the digital library?
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 2001
VO 44
IS 5
SP 66
OP 68
AB Digital libraries offer immense opportunities to provide more 
information to more people in more ways in more places in more time 
zones. Individuals can search, use, and create new information 
resources from their homes, offices, or hotel rooms, and soon may be 
able to do so from planes, trains, automobiles, and beaches. However, 
questions arise about how best to provide information services. Can 
digital libraries provide necessary or sufficient services to satisfy 
most information needs? Can we or should we do without the librarian in 
digital libraries? Alternatively, what roles can or should librarians 
play in digital libraries?
NO ID: 770
UL http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/374308.374344

RT Journal
ID 2959
A1 Bowness,Sue
T1 Librarians vs. technology: expertise in an age of amateur 
researchers
JF Information Highways
YR 2004
FD November-December
AB "Librarians are incredibly poor marketers," says Gary Price. As the 
mind behind ResourceShelf.com, a site that provides news and resources 
for information professionals, Price is a regular observer of the 
information world. He laments the fact that librarians still have an 
image problem in an age when the professional information gatherer's 
services should be more valuable than ever. "The problem is with the 
whole librarian image, that we're just a bunch of people standing 
around -- as my father would say --stamping books. We haven't done 
enough to let people know that the world of the librarian, the library, 
and library resources extends today beyond the four walls of the 
library space."
NO ID: 801
UL 
http://www.econtentinstitute.org/issues/ISarticle.asp?id=157664&story_i
d=42362113250&issue=11012004&PC=

RT Journal
ID 2960
A1 Boyce,Peter B.
T1 Electronic publishing of scientific journals
JF Physics Today
JO Phys Today
YR 1996
IS January
SP 42
OP 47
AB We must avail ourselves of the extraordinary possibilities offered 
by the internet, but without compromising the high standards of the 
refereed research journals. the astronomical society's experience with 
electronic publishing offers some guidance.
NO ID: 61

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 2961
A1 Bradley,Bruce
T1 A library of first resort for science, engineering, and technology: 
the Linda Hall Library
YR 1995
K1 Descriptor: Scientific and technical libraries -- Missouri.
K1 Named Corp: Linda Hall Library.
K1 Genre/Form: Speech
NO article speech; ID: 277
T2 IATUL Conference
UL 
http://educate2.lib.chalmers.se/IATUL/proceedcontents/abs196/Bradley.ht
ml

RT Journal
ID 2962
A1 Bradley,David
T1 Libraries Open to the Public
JF The Alchemist : the ChemWeb magazine
YR 2001
AB Are we about to enter the world of 'the entire full-text refereed 
corpus online, for everyone, for free'? Or, is there still a need to 
balance the following equation? asks David Bradley. The Public Library 
of Science (PLoS), a non-profit organisation of scientists is committed 
to ensuring the scientific and medical literature is entirely freely 
available to everyone on any server, scientist and lay person around 
the globe for the 'benefit of scientific progress, education and the 
public good'.
NO ID: 271
UL http://www.chemweb.com/alchem/articles/1001516763949.html

RT Journal
ID 2963
A1 Branch,Jennifer L.
T1 Nontraditional undergraduates at home, work, and school: an 
examination of information-seeking behaviors and the impact of 
information literacy instruction
JF Research Strategies
YR 2003
VO 19
IS 1
SP 3
OP 15
AB This study examined nontraditional undergraduates' home, work, and 
school information seeking and the perceived impact of an information 
literacy course on their information-seeking behaviors. The 
participants in the study were students in the College at Work (CAW) 
program, a joint venture of the State University of New York at Albany 
and the New York State Education Department (NYSED). Participants 
needed a variety of information for home, work, and school. The 
Internet (and NYSED intranet) was used as the primary source of 
information for work and school and often for home as well. People 
(e.g., friends, family members, coworkers, and professionals) were the 
next most used sources of information. The information literacy course 
taught participants the skills needed to find information effectively 
and efficiently on the Internet and in an academic library. Students 
gained confidence as searchers and as students from the course. 
Participants indicated that the knowledge and skills gained in the 
course were transferred to work and home information seeking.
NO ID: 807
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resstr.2003.09.002

RT Journal
ID 2965
A1 Branin, Joseph J.,Case, Mary
T1 Reforming Scholarly Publishing in the Sciences: A Librarian 
Perspective
JF Notices of the AMS
YR 1998
VO 45
IS 4
SP 475
OP 486
K1 math, mathematics, library, libraries, journal, journals
AB The sheer volume of scholarly publication, the rising cost of this 
scholarship (particularly in the sciences), and the dizzying array of 
new options brought about by advances in information technology all 
conspire to make this an exciting and difficult time to be a research 
librarian. Underlying this tumultuous change and challenge is the 
fundamental question of who owns scholarly publications.
NO ID: 128
UL http://www.ams.org/notices/199804/branin.pdf

RT Journal
ID 2964
A1 Branin,Joseph
A1 Groen,Frances
A1 Thorin,Suzanne
T1 Chaning nature of collection management in research libraries
JF Library Resources & Technical Services
JO Libr.Resour.Tech.Serv.
YR 2000
VO 44
IS 1
SP 23
OP 32
AB Short history of collection development. The URL for the document 
has different text from the journal article.
NO ID: 739
UL http://arl.cni.org/collect/changing.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 2966
A1 Brasted,Robert C.
A1 Clapp,Leallyn B.
A1 Douville,Judith A.
A1 Clapp,Leallyn B.
A1 Douville,Judith A.
T1 Guidelines and Suggested Title List for Undergraduate Chemistry 
Libraries
YR 1982
SP 76
NO ET: Rev.; ET: Rev.; ID: 252
PB American Chemical Society,Brasted, Robert C

RT Book, Section
ID 2967
A1 Breivik,Patricia Senn
T1 Discipline-Specific Models
YR 1998
SP 57
OP 76
NO ID: 668
T2 Student learning in the information age
PB Oryx Press
PP Phoenix, AZ
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1573560006

RT Book, Whole
ID 2968
A1 Breivik,Patricia Senn
T1 Student learning in the information age
YR 1998
SP 173
AB “This easy-to-read volume provides the rationale and means to 
promote and create a successful information literacy 
program....Especially useful are the nuts-and-bolts chapters on 
establishing an information literacy program....Perhaps the most 
imporant aspect of the book is Breivik's savvy approach to the 
challenges of human resources in and outside the library....With more 
than twenty pages of appendices, Breivik provides ample information to 
support any new information literacy endeavor.This volume is an 
important resource for all academic libraries that are looking at ways 
to create information literacy programs or to enhance existing 
instructional programs. Instruction libraries unsure of where to start 
in the implementation of a new literacy program will be well served by 
the information found in this book.”-College and Research Libraries
NO ID: 860
PB American Council on Education/Oryx Press
PP Phoenix, AZ
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search~S2/i1573560006

RT Book, Whole
ID 2969
A1 Bridges,karl
T1 Expectations of librarians in the 21st century
YR 2003
SP 235
AB 1 Land Grant University Reference Librarian of the 21st Century: 
Exciting Opportunities and Unprecedented Challenges / Mary Anne Hansen 
1 2 John Henry's Dilemma / Philip Swan 7 3 Out of the Box / Marie Jones 
11 4 Curious Librarian / Kenneth A. Smith 13 5 Of Babies and Bathwater 
- Hiring Library Staff for the 21st Century / Danelle Hall 17 6 Going 
to Town: Interviewing in the Large Urban Public Library / Alison 
Hopkins 21 7 "Stand Back," Said the Elephant, "I'm Going to Sneeze!" / 
Janice Krueger 25 8 Cooperative Librarian / Jennifer Inglis 29 9 Mere 
Mortals Need Not Apply / Jane Birks, Liz Oesleby 33 10 We're Looking 
for a Few Good Catalogers / Bridgette Scott 37 11 Hiring Academic 
Reference Librarians in the 21st Century / Mary M. Nofsinger 41 12 
Librarians in the 21st Century / Barbara Lovato-Gassman 45 13 Needed: 
Energetic Librarian Willing to Work in Challenging Arena! / Jetta Carol 
Culpepper 49 14 Wanted - New Creations: Dinosaurs Need Not Apply / Anne 
A. Salter 53 15 Librarians: What Supervisors Are Seeking / Kathleen 
Fleming 57 16 Librarians and Human Interaction / Ronda Glikin 59 17 
Business Plan Model of Employment for Librarians / Angela K. Horne 61 
18 Hot Links Are Hot Hires / Virginia E. Young 65 19 Technology Skills 
in Libraries of the 21st Century / Sheila Kasperek 69 20 Word to Future 
Academic Librarians / Vickie Kline 73 21 Preferred Qualification: 
Ability to Think Conceptually / Melinda Dermody 77 22 Voices from the 
21st Century: Librarians at the University of Arizona Library / Carla 
J. Stoffle, Patricia Morris, Ninfa Trejo 81 23 Being a Deep Generalist 
/ Leslie M. Haas 85 24 Academic Reference Librarians for the 21st 
Century / Colleen Boff, Carol Singer 89 25 "The More Things Change": 
What Is a Librarian Today? / Cynthia Akers 93 26 Reference Staff of the 
Digital Beyond / Beth Avery 97 27 It Takes a Cyber Librarian / Janet 
Foster 101 28 Academic Library - Not a Lair for Fiery Dragons / Barbara 
Burd 105 29 Academic Librarian of the Future: The View from California 
Lutheran University / Susan Herzog 109 30 FAKTs of Life: Being a Small-
College Librarian / Molly Flaspohler 115 31 Why a Good "Sh-h-h" Doesn't 
Cut It Anymore: Personality Characteristics of the 21st-Century 
Librarian / Maria C. Bagshaw 119 32 Future of Librarianship / Felix T. 
Chu 123 33 Arrogance: For Obvious Reasons / Shelley Ross 127 34 
Developing Business and Management Skills for the 21st-Century Academic 
Librarian / John Riddle 131 35 21st-Century Librarian / David H. 
Stanley 135 36 Academic Reference as a Second Career / Cheryl Gunselman 
139 37 Academic Librarians as Caring Knowledge Managers: Are We There 
Yet? / Wendy Tan 145 38 Electronic Resources Librarians in the 21st 
Century / Eleanor L. Lomax 149 39 Competition in the Library / David M. 
Bynog 157 40 Qualities of a 21st-Century Librarian / Necia Parker-
Gibson 161 41 More Things Changes in Academe, the More They Need to 
Stay the Same / Karen Fischer 167 42 Joys of Special Librarianship / 
Ronald N. Bukoff 171 43 New Librarians in the 21st Century: The 
Normalization of Change / Lorena O'English 177 44 Electric Luddites: 
Special Collections Librarians Make the Great Leap / Roger C. Adams 183 
45 Selling Instruction: Communicating the Value of the Library in the 
Age of the Internet / Michael J. Rose 187 46 Militant Segregationists, 
Control Freaks, and Techno-Believers / Craighton Hippenhammer 191 47 
Metaphor Matters: Imagining the Future of Librarianship and the Library 
/ Nancy Kuhl 197 48 Seeking: Enthusiastic Artists / Randall M. 
MacDonald, Andrew L. Pearson 205 49 Before We Look to the Future ... / 
Liz Kocevar-Weidinger 209 50 Teaching Excellence and the Academic 
Librarian: Paralleling the Teaching Faculty's Track / Martha Henn 
McCormick 213 51 Library at the University of Vermont in 1900 / Karl 
Bridges 219 52 Most Important Thing They Don't Tell You in Library 
School / Janet T. O'Keefe 225 53 Technical Services Librarians for the 
21st Century: What Are We Looking For? / Gwen M. Gregory 227
NO ID: 804
PB Greenwood Press
PP Westport, CT
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0313322945

RT Report
ID 2970
A1 Brody,Tim
A1 Hajjem,Chawki
A1 Harnad,Stevan
T1 The research-impact cycle: Open access to research output maximizes 
research access
YR 2005
FD May 29 - June 2
AB Presented at the 26th IATUL Conference.
NO ID: 842
PP Québec City, Canada
T3 Tertiary The research-impact cycle: Open access to research output 
maximizes research access
UL 
http://www.iatul.org/conference/proceedings/vol15/PAPERS/Stevan%20Harna
d%20openaccess.ppt

RT Report
ID 2971
A1 Brody,Tim
A1 Harnad,Stevan
T1 Earlier Web Usage Statistics as Predictors of Later Citation Impact
YR 2005
SP 1
OP 11
AB The use of citation counts to assess the impact of research articles 
is well established. However, the citation impact of an article can 
only be measured several years after it has been published. As research 
articles are increasingly accessed through the Web, the number of times 
an article is downloaded can be instantly recorded and counted. One 
would expect the number of times an article is read to be related both 
to the number of times it is cited and to how old the article is. This 
paper analyses how short-term Web usage impact predicts medium-term 
citation impact. The physics e-print archive (arXiv.org) is used to 
test this. This article has been submitted to JASIST.
NO ID: 834
T3 Tertiary Earlier Web Usage Statistics as Predictors of Later 
Citation Impact
UL http://arxiv.org/abs/cs.IR/0503020

RT Journal
ID 2972
A1 Brooks,Terrence A.
T1 The Model of Science and Scientific Models in Librarianship
JF Library Trends
YR 1989
VO 38
IS 2
SP 237
OP 249
NO ID: 275

RT Journal
ID 2974
A1 Brown,Cecelia
T1 The role of electronic preprints in chemical communication: analysis 
of citation, usage, and acceptance in the journal literature
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2003
VO 54
IS 5
SP 362
OP 371
AB This study characterizes the usage and acceptance of electronic 
preprints (e-prints) in the literature of chemistry. Survey of authors 
of e-prints appearing in the Chemistry Preprint Server (CPS) at 
http://preprints. chemweb.com indicates use of the CPS as a convenient 
vehicle for dissemination of research findings and for receipt of 
feedback before submitting to a peer-reviewed journal. Reception of CPS 
e-prints by editors of top chemistry journals is very poor. Only 6% of 
editors responding allow publication of articles that have previously 
appeared as e-prints. Concerns focus on the lack of peer review and the 
uncertain permanence of e-print storage. Consequently, it was not 
surprising to discover that citation analysis yielded no citations to 
CPS e-prints in the traditional literature of chemistry. Yet data 
collected and posted by the CPS indicates that the e-prints are valued, 
read, and discussed to a notable extent within the chemistry community. 
Thirty-two percent of the most highly rated, viewed, and discussed e-
prints eventually appear in the journal literature, indicating the 
validity of the work submitted to the CPS. This investigation 
illustrates the ambivalence with which editors and authors view the 
CPS, but also gives an early sense of the potential free and rapid 
information dissemination, coupled with open, uninhibited discussion 
and evaluation, has to expand, enrich, and vitalize the scholarly 
discourse of chemical scientists.
NO ID: 762
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.10223

RT Journal
ID 2973
A1 Brown,Cecelia
T1 The E-volution of Preprints in the Scholarly Communication of 
Physicists and Astronomers
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2001
FD Feb 1
VO 52
IS 3
SP 187
OP 200
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Citations (References)
K1 Electronic Journals
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Astronomy
K1 Electronic Publishing
K1 Electronic Text
K1 Nonprint Media
K1 Periodicals
K1 Physics
K1 Publications
K1 Science Materials
AB To learn how e-prints are cited, used, and accepted in the 
literature of physics and astronomy, the philosophies, policies, and 
practices of approximately 50 top-tier physics and astronomy journals 
regarding e-prints from the Los Alamos e-print archive were examined. 
Results provide a sense of the current impact of the evolution of e-
prints on the traditional modes of scholarly communication in physics 
and astronomy. (Contains 27 references.) (AEF)
NO EJ621817; 3318-3324(20010201)52:32.0.TX;2-D English 3318-3324 Feb 1, 
2001 187 20010201 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR543422 CIJAUG2001 080 
Journal Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 394

RT Journal
ID 2976
A1 Brown,Cecelia M.
T1 Information Literacy of Physical Science Graduate Students in the 
Information Age
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1999
FD Sep
VO 60
IS 5
SP 426
OP 438
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Information Literacy
K1 Graduate Students
K1 Graduate Study
K1 Higher Education
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Information Utilization
K1 Library Services
K1 Physical Sciences
K1 Search Strategies
K1 Student Attitudes
K1 Student Surveys
AB Reports on findings from a survey exploring the information literacy 
of physical science graduate students. Describes the students' 
perceptions of the physical and psychological components that enhance 
or detract from their ability to find, appraise, and use information 
and how they feel during the various stages of an information search. 
(Author/LRW)
NO EJ595407; 0010-0870(199909)60:52.0.TX;2-Y English 0010-0870 Sep 1999 
426 199909 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR540589 CIJMAY2000 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 396

RT Journal
ID 2977
A1 Brown,Cecelia M.
T1 Information Seeking Behavior of Scientists in the Electronic 
Information Age: Astronomers, Chemists, Mathematicians, and Physicists
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1999
FD Aug
VO 50
IS 10
SP 929
OP 943
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Scientists
K1 Electronic Media
K1 Bibliographic Databases
K1 Electronic Mail
K1 Higher Education
K1 Journal Articles
K1 Library Services
K1 Online Systems
K1 Peer Evaluation
K1 Questionnaires
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Science Libraries
K1 Tables (Data)
AB Assessed the information-seeking behavior of scientists at the 
University of Oklahoma using an electronically distributed 
questionnaire, a copy of which is appended. Results indicate a 
preference for printed peer-reviewed journal articles and the need for 
libraries to provide access to electronic bibliographic databases. 
Appendix II lists electronic journal subscriptions at the University of 
Oklahoma. (Author/LRW)
NO EJ591690; 0002-8231(199908)50:102.0.TX;2-# English 0002-8231 Aug 
1999 929 199908 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR540295 CIJMAR2000 080 
Journal Articles 143 Reports--Research 160 Tests/Questionnaires; ID: 
397

RT Journal
ID 2978
A1 Brown,Cecelia M.
A1 Murphy,Teri J.
T1 Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education
JF RSR: Reference Services Review
YR 2000
FD 2000
VO 28
IS 1
SP 65
OP 80
K1 Annotated Bibliographies
K1 Educational Resources
K1 Information Sources
K1 Mathematics Education
K1 Higher Education
K1 Library Collection Development
K1 Library Materials
K1 Undergraduate Study
AB This annotated bibliography serves as a template for a comprehensive 
collection of Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education (RUME) 
resources. Bibliographic and access information for the standards, 
reports, journals, monographs and monographic series important for the 
creation of an up-to-date and complete RUME collection are given. 
(Author/AEF)
NO EJ613362; 0090-7324(2000)28:12.0.TX;2-3 English 0090-7324 2000 65 
2000 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR542131 CIJMAR2001 080 Journal Articles 
131 Reference Materials--Bibliographies; ID: 395

RT Journal
ID 2975
A1 Brown,Cecelia
A1 Krumholz,Lee R.
T1 Integrating Information Literacy into the Science Curriculum
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2002
FD Mar
VO 63
IS 2
SP 111
OP 123
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 College Science
K1 Course Integrated Library Instruction
K1 Information Literacy
K1 Higher Education
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Information Utilization
K1 Librarian Teacher Cooperation
K1 Measures (Individuals)
K1 Models
AB Describes a study conducted at the University of Oklahoma that 
assessed information-seeking, evaluating, and usage abilities before, 
during and after an upper-level science course. Explains the 
bibliographic instruction offered during class, and proposes a model 
for incorporating information literacy into upper-level science courses 
and an instrument for measuring information literacy. (Author/LRW)
NO EJ645668; 0010-0870(200203)63:22.0.TX;2-4 English 0010-0870 Mar 2002 
111 200203 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR545601 CIJSEP2002 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 393

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 2979
A1 Brown,Elizabeth
T1 Instruction: a key to understanding scientists' user behavior
YR 2005
AB Library information sessions are an effective way to interact with 
students and faculty. Instruction sessions can take many forms: library 
tours, demonstrations of the online catalog and subject index 
databases, and individual consultations. These interactions provide 
details on how users access information and give insight into their 
perception of library resources and services.
NO ID: 840
T2 SLA Annual Conference
PP Toronto, ONT
UL http://www.sla.org/division/dche/2005/brown.pdf

RT Book, Section
ID 2980
A1 Brown,Mary E.
T1 Library attractibility based on social styles of users
YR 1991
SP 295
OP 301
K1 Descriptor: Use studies -- College and university libraries.
K1 Librarianship -- Social aspects
NO BLIB92006851 Provider: OCLC; charts. 0938734563 Related Record: 
blib92006375 English analytic; ID: 450
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (54th :1991 
:Washington, D.C.). ASIS '91 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Book, Section
ID 2981
A1 Brown,Mary E.
T1 A general model of information-seeking behavior
YR 1991
SP 9
OP 14
K1 Descriptor: Information needs
NO BLIB92006796 Provider: OCLC; il. 0938734563 Related Record: 
blib92006375 English analytic; ID: 454
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (54th :1991 
:Washington, D.C.). ASIS '91 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Book, Section
ID 2982
A1 Brundage,Christina A.
T1 Teaching controlled vocabulary and natural language to end-users of 
scientific online and CD-ROM databases
YR 1990
SP 3
OP 13
K1 Scientific Technical libraries -- Reference services -- Automation -
- User education
K1 Technology and science-- Information services -- User education
K1 Database searching -- Study and teaching
K1 Technology science -- Databases
K1 End-user computing
AB Paper reviews similarities between scientific language and search 
language using controlled vocabulary or natural language. Discusses the 
nature of end users in science libraries, types of information needs, 
and methods to teach the use of appropriate vocabulary.
NO Book also published as Science & Technology Libraries, v10(1) 1989; 
ID: 217
A2 Mount,Ellis
T2 End-user training for sci-tech databases
PB Haworth Press
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 2983
A1 Brunsdale,Maureen
T1 From mild to wild: strategies for promoting academic libraries to 
undergraduates
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 2000
FD Summer
VO 39
IS 4
SP 331
OP 335
K1 Descriptor: Public relations of libraries -- College and university 
libraries
AB Increasingly, the World Wide Web seems to be luring students away 
from their local campus library for their research assignments. This 
articles' intent is not to examine why this phenomenon is taking place. 
Rather, its purpose is to outline some strategies for promoting an 
academic library and therefore improving awareness of library services-
-so as to not lose one of the academic library's primary user groups, 
the undergraduate student, to resources such as the Web. A foundation 
will be laid by first examining the definition of marketing, the 
overriding concept of promotion. Building on this foundation, possible 
strategies for increasing student awareness and use of the academic 
library--its services and resources--will be outlined. Along the way, 
examples ranging from "the mild" to "the wild" will be detailed to 
demonstrate that promotional campaigns truly can take all sorts of 
shapes. Any promotional style results in a win-win situation for 
everyone involved: the students learn from and with the library staff, 
and the library becomes a strong partner in the educational lives of 
the students.
NO BLIB00009499 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0033-7072 Details: 
bibl f. article feature article; ID: 501

RT Journal
ID 2984
A1 Bryant,Douglas W.
T1 Centralization and Decentralization at Harvard
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1961
IS September
SP 328
OP 334
NO ID: 92

RT Report
ID 2985
A1 Buckholtz,Alison
T1 Open Access: Restoring Scientific communication to its rightful 
owners - European Science Policy Briefing 21
YR 2003
FD April
SP 1
OP 8
AB The European Science Foundation, having a responsibility as the 
"European voice of science", has to be concerned and involved in 
developments in information and communications technology (ICT) and the 
profound effect it have on the way in which research is conducted. It 
is for this reason that it was pleased to help support the two major 
workshops on the Open Archives Initiative held at CERN in 2001 and 
2002, resulting in this report. The European Science Foundation 
promotes high quality science at a European level.
NO ID: 520
T3 Tertiary Open Access: Restoring Scientific communication to its 
rightful owners - European Science Policy Briefing 21
UL http://www.esf.org/publication/157/ESPB21.pdf

RT Journal
ID 2986
A1 Buckley,Chad
A1 Burright,Marian
A1 Pendergast,Amy
A1 Sapon-White,Richard
A1 Taylor,Anneliese
T1 Electronic publishing of scholarly journals: a bibliogaphic essay of 
current issues
JF Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship
YR 1999
IS 22
AB This multi-part bibliographic essay identifies the most relevant 
issues about the publishing of scholarly electronic journals: Access, 
Cataloging and Indexing, Pricing, Archiving, and Licensing. Each of 
these issues merits careful consideration in its own right; however, as 
these essays demonstrate, the issues are vast, complex, and very 
interdependent. These sections ask questions such as: Who will take the 
responsibility for archiving? Will data remain unaltered after 
publication? Will libraries still have access to archival copies after 
canceling a subscription? The sections below highlight the current 
debates on each topic and provide references to sources of further 
study.
NO ID: 189
UL http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/99-spring/article4.html

RT Journal
ID 2987
A1 Budd,John
T1 Information seeking in theory and practice: rethinking public 
services in libraries
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 2001
FD Spring
VO 40
IS 3
SP 256
OP 263
AB Information needs. Communication. Cognition. Reference services. 
Bakhtin, M. M. (Mikhail Mikhailovich), 1895-1975 -- Attitudes, 
opinions, etc.
NO BLIB01006054 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1094-9054 Details: 
bibl f. article feature article; ID: 463

RT Journal
ID 2988
A1 Budd,John
T1 Information seeking in theory and practice: rethinking public 
services in libraries. theories of M. M. Bakhtin
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 2001
FD Spring
VO 40
IS 3
SP 256
OP 263
K1 Descriptor: Information needs.
K1 Communication.
K1 Cognition.
K1 Reference services.
K1 Named Person: Bakhtin, M. M. (Mikhail Mikhailovich), 1895-1975 -- 
Attitudes, opinions, etc
AB The philosophical and practical work of M. M. Bakhtin provides an 
important aid to theoretical grounding with regard to information 
seeking. In particular, his ideas of dialogic communication suggest a 
way to engage in the act of information seeking and the accompanying 
mediation. His work is especially important because of its 
phenomenological basis, which emphasizes the intentionality of 
communication, the connection of practice to being, and the 
relationship between self and other. Bakhtin's thought offers a 
framework for the rethinking of public services in libraries.
NO BLIB01006054 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1094-9054 Details: 
bibl f. article feature article; ID: 497

RT Journal
ID 2989
A1 Burek Pierce,Jennifer
T1 Digital Discomfort? 'Get Over It,' Says McClure
JF American Libraries
JO Am.Libr.
YR 2002
VO 33
IS 5
SP 45
AB Says we need to collect more data concerning digital and virtual 
reference services -- metrics.
NO ID: 791

RT Book, Section
ID 2990
A1 Burgett,James
A1 Haar,John
A1 Phillips,Linda L.
T1 The Persistence of Print in a Digital World: Three ARL Libraries 
Confront an Enduring Issue
YR 2001
SP 75
OP 80
AB As libraries become more digital, electronic collection development 
inevitably preoccupies us. Paradoxically, managing print collections 
becomes more important as we dedicate increased financial resources to 
electronic materials. Considerable ingenuity is required to purchase 
and store print as the electronic portion of the budget grows, and as 
library buildings approach capacity.
NO ID: 291
A2 Thompson,Hugh A.
T2 Crossing the divide : proceedings of the Tenth National Conference 
of the Association of College and Research Libraries, March 15-18, 
2001, Denver, Colorado
PB ACRL
PP Denver, CO
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/papers01/burgett.pdf

RT Journal
ID 2991
A1 Burnham,Paul D.
T1 Private liberal arts colleges and the cost of scientific journals: a 
perennial dilemma
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1998
IS September
SP 406
OP 420
AB Study seeks to learn how academic librarians in these institutions 
are coping with the price increases. How do they inform and negotiate 
with their science departments. What alternate strategies are employed 
to maintain access.
NO ID: 144

RT Journal
ID 2993
A1 Burrell,Quentin L.
T1 Predicting future citation behavior
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2003
VO 54
IS 5
SP 372
OP 378
AB In this article we further develop the theory for a stochastic model 
for the citation process in the presence of obsolescence to predict the 
future citation pattern of individual papers in a collection. More 
precisely, we investigate the conditional distribution--and its mean-- 
of the number of citations to a paper after time t, given the number of 
citations it has received up to time t. In an important parametric case 
it is shown that the expected number of future citations is a linear 
function of the current number, this being interpretable as an example 
of a success-breeds-success phenomenon.
NO ID: 761
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.10207

RT Journal
ID 2992
A1 Burrell,Quentin L.
T1 Will this paper ever be cited?
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 3
SP 232
OP 235
AB A recently proposed stochastic model to describe the citation 
process in the presence of obsolescence is used to answer the question: 
If a paper has not been cited by time t after its publication, what is 
the probability that it will ever be cited? For a homogenous set of 
papers given the average rate at which a paper attracts citations, 
Burrell calculates the probability that a paper will ever be cited 
assuming it has not been cited in a given time. The longer the elapsed 
time without citation the greater the likelihood it will never be 
cited.
NO ID: 745
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/89011941/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 2994
A1 Burstein,David
T1 Astronomers and the Science Citation Index, 1981-1997
JF Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
YR 2000
VO 32
IS 3
SP 917
OP 936
NO ID: 231
UL http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/v32n3/burstein.pdf

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 2995
A1 Butcher,H.
T1 Information Overload in management and business
YR 1995
AB Considers three dimensions of management research into information 
overload. 1) personal information overload 2) organizational and 3) 
customer. They suggest solutions.
NO ID: 94
T2 IEE Colloquium on Information Overload
PB IEE

RT Journal
ID 2997
A1 Butler,Declan
T1 Introduction
JF Nature (Web Focus)
YR 2004
AB The topic of this Nature web focus, the future of access to the 
scientific literature, is the subject of lively debate among 
librarians, publishers, learned societies, and scientists. Much of the 
debate is about whether the literature should be 'open access,' and if 
so, how the costs of publishing should be met, and by whom. Should 
scientific publishing, as some argue, be primarily financed upfront by 
funding agencies, akin to the way in which public funds are often used 
to pay for the publishing of genome, astronomical and crystallographic 
data in large databases? Or are the needs of scientists, quality, and 
innovation, best served by a competitive market in publishing? Or is 
the optimal solution a mix of both, depending of what it is that is 
being published?
NO ID: 637
UL http://www.nature.com/nature/focus/accessdebate/1.html

RT Journal
ID 2996
A1 Butler,Declan
T1 Scientific publishing: Who will pay for open access?
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2003
VO 425
IS 6958
SP 554
OP 555
AB A new biology journal, positioned to compete with the likes of 
Nature, Science and Cell, aims to reinvent the economics of high-
quality scientific publishing. Declan Butler examines the bottom line. 
In June and July, television viewers in three US cities were treated to 
a 30-second commercial, in which a besuited man emerged from his house, 
to the voiceover: "In the year 2003, the Public Library of Science made 
it possible for people all over the world to have access to the latest 
scientific discoveries. Shortly thereafter, things began to change." In 
a scene reminiscent of The Matrix: Reloaded, the man then zoomed off 
into the sky. To the average viewer, it must have been perplexing 
stuff.
NO ID: 633
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v425/n6958/full/425554a_r.html&fi
letype=&dynoptions=

RT Journal
ID 2998
A1 Calderhead,Veronica
T1 A user based perspective of an academic chemistry library relocation
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1996
VO 16
IS 1
SP 51
OP 60
AB The relocation of a departmental chemistry library into a 
centralized academic library is felt most keenly by the primary users 
of the departmental library. The main concern in a centralization 
project should be in convincing the chemistry user group that the 
relocation is not a loss. The emphasis should be placed on improved 
services and collection management rather than library administrative 
efficiency. The successful closure should highlight the human 
underpinning of a library.
NO ID: 64

RT Journal
ID 2999
A1 Calderhead,Veronica
T1 An operations research approach to a chemistry library relocation: 
measure often, move once
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 1996
VO 16
IS 1
SP 61
OP 80
K1 John Cotton Dana Library.
K1 Chemical libraries and collections.
K1 Moving of books and libraries.
K1 Planning, Library New Jersey
NO ID: 88

RT Journal
ID 3000
A1 Callaghan,Thomas
A1 Mucha,Peter J.
A1 Porter,Mason A.
T1 The Bowl Championship Series: A Mathematical Review
JF Notices of the American Mathematical Society
YR 2004
VO 51
IS 8
SP 887
OP 893
AB On February 29, 2004, the college football Bowl Championship Series 
(BCS) announced a proposal to add a fifth game to the “BCS bowls” to 
improve access for midmajor teams ordinarily denied invitations to 
these lucrative postseason games. Although still subject to final 
approval, this agreement is expected to be instituted with the new BCS 
contract just prior to the 2006 season. There aren’t too many ways that 
things could have gone worse this past college football season with the 
BCS Standings governing which teams play in the coveted BCS bowls. The 
controversy over USC’s absence from the BCS National Championship game, 
despite being #1 in both polls, garnered most of the media attention 
[12], but it is the yearly treatment received by the “non-BCS” midmajor 
schools that appears to have finally generated changes in the BCS 
system [15].
NO ID: 666
UL http://www.ams.org/notices/200408/fea-mucha.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3002
A1 Carlson,Scott
T1 Scholars Note 'Decay' of Citations to Online References
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2005
VO 51
IS 28
SP A30
AB Michael Bugeja says that when he got his doctorate in English, he 
studied the difference between "fair" and "foul" copies of 
Shakespeare's plays -- a foul copy being rife with inaccuracies. 
"That's because the medium of printing was unstable back then," says 
Mr. Bugeja, a professor of journalism and communication at Iowa State 
University. Now that the Internet is the new unstable publishing 
medium, he and a colleague have studied how Web links stop working, or 
"decay," as those sites change addresses or shut down. They focused on 
links used by scholars in footnotes that cite Web materials.
NO ID: 691
UL http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i28/28a03002.htm

RT Journal
ID 3001
A1 Carlson,Scott
T1 Do Libraries Really Need Books? Controversial Projects at Some 
Colleges Move the Printed Word out of Sight
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2002
FD July 12, 2002
VO 48
IS 44
SP A31
AB Students turn to the Internet instead of books. So she's looking 
forward to a new library at Marquette, to be stocked with computers and 
digital-media centers. She hopes that they will help teach a generation 
raised more on cathode-ray tubes than printing presses. "My guess is 
that people are reading the things that they really rely on for 
information online," Ms. Wake says. "So to pretend that we're living in 
yesterday isn't helpful."
NO ID: 347
UL http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i44/44a03101.htm

RT Journal
ID 3003
A1 Carnevale,Dan
T1 Libraries With Tight Budgets Renew Complaints About Elsevier's 
Online Pricing
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2003
VO 50
IS 17
SP A33
AB A growing number of colleges in the country are rebelling against a 
major publishing company's rates and terms for online science journals. 
Some of the institutions are even cutting back on their subscriptions 
to avoid having to pay for a "bundle" of the publications, which 
university libraries on tight budgets say they can no long afford. The 
company, Reed Elsevier, is based in the Netherlands and sells 
subscriptions to a collection of 1,200 online journals that is called 
ScienceDirect. A bundled subscription costs far less than individual 
subscriptions to all 1,200 journals, but the bundled package also 
includes many specialized publications that comparatively few 
researchers use, and Elsevier does not permit institutions to create 
their own bundles.
NO ID: 756
UL http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i17/17a03302.htm

RT Journal
ID 3004
A1 Carpenter,Todd A.
A1 Joseph,Heather
A1 Waltham,Mary
T1 Survey of business trends at BioOne publishing partners and its 
implications for BioOne
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2004
VO 4
IS 4
SP 465
OP 484
AB This paper describes a survey of BioOne participating publishers 
that was conducted during the fall of 2003. In that survey, BioOne 
collected data from 18 not-for-profit publishers on circulation levels, 
scholarly output in terms of pages and articles produced, revenues, and 
expenditures. From eight of the publishers, complete profit, loss, and 
circulation information was gathered, while the remaining 10 publishers 
only provided circulation data and answered general operations 
questions. This information was then compiled to compare the business 
operations of these publishers against industry-standard benchmarks to 
assess their business practices and to examine the effect of recent 
trends on publishers' revenue streams and costs. The paper also 
explores these data in relation to shifting to a publishing model based 
not on print but electronic subscriptions.
NO ID: 694
UL 
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v004/4.4c
arpenter_t.html

RT Journal
ID 3005
A1 Carr,Carol
T1 Teaching and using chemical information: Annotated bibliography, 
1993-1993
JF Journal of chemical education
JO J.Chem.Educ.
YR 2000
VO 7
IS 3
SP 412
OP 422
NO ID: 253
UL jchemed.chem.wisc.edu

RT Dissertation/Thesis
ID 3006
A1 Carter,June D.
T1 Support for biology department faculty research by an academic 
library : a follow-up journal citation study
YR 1999
SP 38
K1 Descriptor: Library schools -- Theses -- University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
K1 Citation analysis.
K1 Biological libraries and collections -- Evaluation.
K1 Periodicals, Biological.
K1 Named Corp: Couch Biology Library
NO United States English monograph; ID: 474
PB Univ of NC at Chapel Hill.Editor

RT Book, Whole
ID 3007
A1 Case,Donald Owen
T1 Looking for information : a survey of research on information 
seeking, needs, and behavior
YR 2002
SP 350
AB This is the table of contents -- Introduction and Examples, 
Information Behavior: An Introduction, Common Examples of Information 
Behavior, Concepts Relevant to Information Behavior, Concept of 
Information, Information Needs and Information Seeking, Related 
Concepts, Models, Paradigms, and Theories in the Study of Information 
Behavior, Models of Information Behavior, Perspectives, Paradigms, and 
Theories, Methods for Studying Information Behavior, Research Process, 
Methods: Examples by Type, Research Results and Reflections, Reviewing 
the Research: Its History, Size, and Topics, Research by Occupation, 
Research by Social Role and Demographic Group, Reviewing, Critiquing, 
Concluding.
NO ID: 632
PB Academic Press
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i012150381X

RT Journal
ID 3008
A1 Casey,Charles P.
T1 Challenges for chemists, chemistry, and ACS
JF Chemical and Engineering News
JO Chem.Eng.News
YR 2004
VO 82
IS 1
SP 2
OP 5
AB Combined challenges of soaring library costs and "open access" to 
literature. There are two trends in scientific publishing that are 
coming together to create problems that should concern chemists and 
ACS. Because chemists play a crucial role in producing these research 
publications, they can have an enormous influence on the future of 
scientific publications--if they assert themselves. One trend is the 
very high and rapidly increasing prices of commercial science journals 
that are threatening the ability of university and industry libraries 
to maintain their access to the scientific literature. Libraries 
nationwide are canceling subscriptions to less used journals, only to 
see their costs continue to rise much faster than inflation. Although 
ACS journals provide very high quality at a reasonable cost, commercial 
publishers such as Elsevier charge much higher prices for what, in some 
cases, are lower quality journals.
NO ID: 764
UL http://pubs.acs.org/cen/coverstory/8201/8201president.html

RT Journal
ID 3009
A1 Cavill,Patricia M.
T1 Advocacy: How Does it Differ from Public Relations and Marketing?
JF Feliciter
YR 2001
VO 47
IS 2
SP 90
OP 93
AB "There is a great deal of confusion in the library community 
regarding the terms 'public relations,' 'marketing' and 'advocacy'. " 
She clears up the confusion and misconceptions of those terms.
NO ID: 298

RT Journal
ID 3010
A1 Chandler,Karen
T1 Practical Promotional Strategies for Your Information Service
JF Aslib Information
YR 1991
VO 19
IS 2
SP 48
OP 49
AB Nice short article. States that basically, marketing is about three 
simple things: knowing who your customers/potential customers are, 
gearing your products and services to them, and making sure that they 
know about you.
NO ID: 299

RT Journal
ID 3011
A1 Chao,Hungyune
T1 Assessing the quality of academic libraries on the Web: The 
development and testing of criteria
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2002
VO 24
IS 2
SP 169
OP 194
AB This study develops and tests an instrument useful for evaluating 
the quality of academic libraries on the World Wide Web (Libweb). By 
consulting authoritative criteria used for traditional print resources 
and Internet/Web resources, a set of 68 essential indicators was 
generated and later reorganized and reduced to 16 criteria through 
factor analysis. After a survey of library experts, the instrument's 
reliability was verified by analysis of variance. Furthermore, a 
regression model considering both the respondents' demographics and the 
quality criteria was applied to identify 11 significant factors, which 
were later reduced to eight factors. These eight factors represent the 
most salient and nonredundant criteria. Two instrument forms are 
suggested for prospective users to evaluate academic Libweb quality and 
to construct and maintain a good site. [Copyright 2002 Elsevier]
NO ID: 526

RT Book, Whole
ID 3012
A1 Chen,Ching-chih
T1 Information seeking : assessing and anticipating user needs
YR 1982
SP 205
AB Information services. Libraries.
NO ID: 672
PB Neal-Schuman Publishers
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0918212502

RT Journal
ID 3013
A1 Christiansen,Donald
T1 Ephemera for Engineers and scientists
JF Today's Engineer (IEEE)
YR 2003
FD February
AB I usually think of ephemera as anything at a flea market that would 
be badly damaged in a sudden rainstorm — like old copies of National 
Geographic magazine or a letter signed by Abraham Lincoln. Mostly paper 
goods. But now I find that ephemera appear on — and by definition 
disappear from — the World Wide Web. I often run across an interesting 
article, make a mental note to revisit it, and then find it is gone, 
sometimes within a few days, when I search for it again. I have taken 
to downloading or printing out anything that I consider of 
significance.
NO ID: 777
UL http://www.todaysengineer.org/feb04/backscatter.asp

RT Journal
ID 3014
A1 Christie,Anne
A1 Kristick,Laurel
T1 Developing an Online Science Journal Collection: A Quick Tool for 
Assigning Priorities
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2001
IS 30
AB Oregon State University Libraries are committed to increasing 
electronic access to information. The catalog, myriad databases, and a 
small collection of e-books are accessible over the Internet. OSU 
Libraries are now focusing attention on access to primary science 
journals. Using an existing library liaison network, we conducted an 
informal e-mail poll of science faculty. We asked them for lists of the 
"top ten" journals that they would like to access electronically. These 
faculty lists have been compiled into an Excel spreadsheet for 
analysis. Other data added to the spreadsheet include the publisher, 
whether or not the Libraries have a current subscription (print or 
electronic), cost of the subscription, licensing conditions and the ISI 
impact factors and rankings. We are using this information to set 
priorities for the allocation of staff time and available funding to 
develop the online science journal collection.
NO ID: 701
UL http://www.istl.org/01-spring/article2.html

RT Journal
ID 3016
A1 Chrzastowski,Tina E.
T1 Making the transition from print to electronic serial collections: A 
new model for academic chemistry libraries?
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 54
IS 12
SP 1141
OP 1148
AB A new model academic chemistry library is proposed at the University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in which primary access to 
journals is electronic, replacing traditional print access, binding, 
and shelving. Print journals will continue to be purchased and archived 
unbound in a remote storage facility following unbound display and 
access for twelve months. The new model, initially proposed by 
administrative chemistry faculty, was assessed in a feasibility study 
which looked at the stability, quantity, and quality of electronic 
journals; it also included a survey of chemistry faculty, a review of 
internal management data, and an analysis of use of chemistry journals, 
both print and electronic. The feasibility study found support for the 
model in every area, but with a few caution flags and speed bumps 
predicted along the way.
NO ID: 685
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/104547613/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3017
A1 Chrzastowski,Tina E.
T1 Letter to the Editor: Rejoinder: Transition from print to electronic 
serials
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 4
SP 370
OP 371
AB My thanks to Phil Davis (Cornell University) for his careful reading 
of my recent JASIST publication, a paper presented at the Tri-Societies 
Symposium at SLA in Los Angeles, June 2002. I am happy to address his 
concerns about my analysis.
NO ID: 686
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106600472/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3015
A1 Chrzastowski,Tina E.
T1 Chemistry journal use and cost: Results of a longitudinal study
JF Library Resources & Technical Services
JO Libr.Resour.Tech.Serv.
YR 1997
IS 41
SP 101
OP 111
AB Use studies/Serial publications; Chemical libraries and 
collections/Serial publications; Periodicals/Time and cost studies; 
Periodicals, Chemical; University of Illinois at Urbana-
Champaign/Library
NO ID: 687

RT Journal
ID 3018
A1 Clewis,Beth
T1 Scientific literacy: A review of the literature and implications for 
librarianship
JF Collection Management
YR 1990
VO 12
IS 3/4
SP 101
OP 112
NO ID: 743

RT Journal
ID 3019
A1 Cockerill,Matthew J.
T1 Delayed impact: ISI's citation tracking choices are keeping 
scientists in the dark
JF BMC Bioinformatics
JO BMC Bioinformatics
YR 2004
VO 5
SP 93
AB Impact factors – love them or loathe them, as a publisher it is 
difficult to ignore them. The number one question that BioMed Central 
gets asked by potential authors is "What is the impact factor of the 
journal XXXXXX?". The scientific community has come to regard impact 
factors, calculated by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), 
as providing a quantitative and largely objective guide to which 
journals publish the best research. Although many problems can result 
from naïve reliance on journal impact factors as a quality metric 
(especially when attempting to compare different fields) [1], the 
perception of many scientists is that, to get recognition and career 
advancement, they must publish in a journal with a good impact factor.
NO ID: 759
UL http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2105/5/93

RT Journal
ID 3020
A1 Coleman,Anita
T1 Instruments of cognition: Use of Citations and Web Links in Online 
Teaching Materials
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2005
VO 56
IS 4
SP 382
OP 392
AB Use of citations and web links embedded in online teaching materials 
was studied for an undergraduate course. The undergraduate students 
enrolled in Geographic Information Science for Geography and Regional 
Development used web links more often than citations, but clearly did 
not see them as key to enhancing learning. Current conventions for 
citing and linking tend to make citations and links invisible. There is 
some evidence that citations and web links categorized and highlighted 
in terms of their importance and function to be served may help student 
learning in interdisciplinary domains.
NO ID: 625
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/109860200/ABSTRACT

RT Book, Whole
ID 3021
A1 Committee on issues in the Transborder Flow of Scientific Data
A1 U.S. National Committee for CODATA
A1 Commission on Physical Sciences
A1 Mathematics and Applications
A1 Council,National Research
T1 Bits of Power : Issues in Global Access to Scientific Data
YR 1997
K1 Communication in science, research -- information services, database 
management, information technology
NO ET: 1st; Q223.B58 1997; ID: 161
PB National Academy Press
PP Washington, D.C.
SN 0-309-05635-7
UL http://www.nap.edu

RT Book, Whole
ID 3022
A1 Conkling,Thomas W.
A1 Musser,Linda R.
T1 Engineering libraries: building collections and delivering services
YR 2001
AB Introduction / Thomas W. Conkling, Linda R. Musser -- Transforming 
scientific communication for the 21st century / Steven Gass -- Building 
a library collection to support new engineering programs / Beth L. Brin 
-- Resource sharing in engineering and science libraries / Charlotte A. 
Erdmann -- Grey literature in engineering / Larry A. Thompson -- 
International resources in science and technology: a review with two 
case studies / Bonnie A. Osif -- Engineering resources for children - 
kindergarten through 12th grade: a case for dispositional learning / 
Justina O. Osa, Steven L. Herb -- Virtual engineering libraries / Jill 
H. Powell -- The digital engineering library: current technologies and 
challenges / William H. Mischo -- Building better library web sites: 
state of the art and future trends / Christy Hightower -- Model for a 
web-based information literacy course: design, conversion and 
experiences / Leslie J. Reynolds -- Industry expectations of the new 
engineer / Ronald J. Rodrigues -- The implementation of information 
technology in the corporate engineering library / Robert Schwarzwalder 
-- Focusing on the user for improved service quality / Deborah Helman, 
Lisa R. Horowitz -- Opportunities for creativity: Fundraising for 
engineering and science libraries / Joanne V. Lerud, Lisa G. Dunn. 
(Also published as Science and Technology Libraries 19(3/4))
NO ID: 594
PB Haworth
PP Binghamton, NY
SN 0789016729
UL 
http://www.haworthpress.com/store/Toc_views.asp?TOCName=J122v19n03_TOC&
desc=Volume%3A%2019%20Issue%3A%203%2F4

RT Journal
ID 3023
A1 Cooksey,Elizabeth B.
T1 Too Important to be Left to Chance- Serendipity and the Digital 
Library
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 2004
VO 25
IS 1/2
SP 23
OP 32
AB This article discusses the meaning of “serendipity” in the digital 
library, with an emphasis on the role of librarians in facilitating 
conditions of serendipity for a scientific audience. It argues that the 
digital revolution has created a greater need among scientists for 
libraries and librarians. Provided a wealth of new resources instantly 
available online, scientists who miss crucial information by focusing 
on a small number of resources with which they are familiar need to 
interact with their librarians on an ever-increasing basis. The 
importance of providing not only access to digital resources, but also 
more and more guidance beyond “Google” and its analogs, is required so 
that scientists can make the connections needed in their information 
searches.
NO ID: 564
UL 
https://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ698
9HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&ID=47979

RT Journal
ID 3024
A1 Cothey,Vivian
T1 A Longitudinal Study of World Wide Web Users' Information-Searching 
Behavior
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
FD Jan 15
VO 53
IS 2
SP 67
OP 78
K1 Search Strategies
K1 World Wide Web
K1 Search Behavior
K1 Analysis of Variance
K1 College Students
K1 Foreign Countries
K1 Higher Education
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Longitudinal Studies
K1 Regression (Statistics)
AB This study of the Web information searching behavior of 206 United 
Kingdom college students over a 10-month period showed that, contrary 
to expectations, the users adopted a more passive or browsing approach 
to Web information searching and became more eclectic in their 
selection of Web hosts as they gained experience. (Contains 61 
references.)
NO EJ643512; 3318-3324(20020115)53:22.0.TX;2-# Special issue on Web 
Research. English 3318-3324 Jan 15, 2002 67 20020115 Journal Article 
(CIJE) a IR545634 CIJAUG2002 080 Journal Articles 143 Reports--
Research; ID: 387

RT Journal
ID 3025
A1 Covi,Lisa M.
T1 Debunking the myth of the Nintendo generation: How doctoral students 
introduce new electronic communication practices into university 
research
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 14
SP 1284
OP 1294
AB Current research on the influence of electronic communication 
technologies such as electronic mail, World Wide Web, electronic 
journals, bibliographic databases, and on-line card catalogs suggest 
that they broaden academic research communities and change the ways 
researchers work. However, it is less well-understood how these changes 
take place. One explanation is that the mechanism for change is 
generational: doctoral students transform research disciplines as they 
apply new electronic communication skills they grew up with. This 
article examines this explanation and related claims through evidence 
from a study of 28 graduate students and their advisors in four 
disciplines (molecular biology, literary theory, sociology, and 
computer science) at eight U.S. research universities. Although all the 
doctoral students used electronic communication technologies in various 
ways, their work practices reinforced existing patterns of work and 
resource use in their disciplines. Students used electronic 
communication to (1) mimic the electronic communication patterns of 
their advisor, (2) differentiate or specialize their research with 
respect to their advisor or research specialty, (3) enhance the social 
connections and material resources their advisor or institution 
provided to them, and/or (4) ease or improve hands-on research 
techniques (textual analysis, wet lab work, programming, statistical 
analysis) that their advisor or research group delegated to them.
NO ID: 208
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/75000114/START

RT Journal
ID 3026
A1 Covi,Lisa M.
A1 Cragin,Melissa H.
T1 Reconfiguring control in library collection development: A 
conceptual framework for assessing the shift toward electronic 
collections
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 4
SP 312
OP 325
AB Academic and special libraries are in the midst of a shift toward 
hybrid collections. This shift from collection ownership to an 
information access model supports the distributed nature of learning 
and work. However, unanticipated consequences of these changes are 
emerging. One confounding result is a visible pattern of 
discontinuities in collections, with unique features for electronic 
products. Patterns of discontinuities encountered included the 
occurrence of intermittent holes and unintentionally masked 
information. This has both immediate and long-term implications for 
library users and services, and there are not yet coherent measures to 
assess these sorts of outcomes. A framework is required for the 
systematic evaluation of the effects of new systems such as bundled 
electronic resources. This research suggests that evaluating both use 
and non-use of electronic collections will supplement other 
acquisitions and service measures to support long-range planning and 
decision-making.
NO ID: 652
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106566256/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3027
A1 Cox,Marti A.
T1 Colorado Library Marketing Council: Giving Librarians the Tools to 
Market Their Skills
JF Colorado Libraries
YR 2001
VO 27
IS 4
SP 37
OP 40
AB Reports that an annual state-funded workshop has greatly benefited 
many of Colorado's public, academic and special libraries. The Council 
has resources and bibliographies at http://www.clmc.org.
NO ID: 300

RT Journal
ID 3028
A1 Cox,Richard J.
A1 Yakel,Elizabeth
A1 Wallace,David A.
T1 Educating archivists in library and information science schools
JF Journal of Education for Library and Information Science
YR 2001
FD Summer 2001article feature article
VO 42
IS 3
SP 228
OP 240
K1 Descriptor: Archivists -- Education.
K1 Education for librarianship -- Evaluation.
K1 Named Corp: Association for Library and Information Science 
Education
NO ID: 278

RT Journal
ID 3029
A1 Crawford,Brian D.
T1 Open-access publishing: where is the value?
JF Lancet
JO Lancet
YR 2003
VO 362
IS 9395
SP 1578
OP 1580
AB Will open access to peer-reviewed research really enable us to 
better organise valuable archival information and to orchestrate its 
communication by the scholars of today and tomorrow, so as to improve 
science? In biomedicine in particular, will open access provide the 
accurate evidence-based information needed at the point of patients’ 
care to make health-care delivery more reliable? Will open access truly 
generate, capture, and redirect cost savings to fund additional 
research? Will open sharing of research accelerate the uptake of 
translational research by busy practising physicians and modernise 
their medical practice? While these are among the many and varied 
claims of the proponents of open access publishing, the business models 
put forth have done little to show how any of these goals can be 
realised.
NO ID: 584

RT Book, Whole
ID 3030
A1 Crawford,Susan Y.
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
A1 Weller,Ann C.
T1 From Print to Electronic : The Transformation of Scientific 
Communication
YR 1996
K1 Communication in science, telecommunication, electronic publishing
AB Has chapter titles: Scientific communication and the growth of big 
science / Susan Y. Crawford -- Models of scientific communications 
systems / Julie M. Hurd -- The human genome project / Ann C. Weller -- 
High energy physics / Julie M. Hurd -- Astronomy, astrophysics, and 
space physics / Susan Y. Crawford -- The changing scientific and 
technical communications system / Julie M. Hurd, Ann C. Weller, and 
Susan Y. Crawford. The keywords are communication in science, 
telecommunication, and electronic publishing.
NO Q223.C73 1996; ID: 233
PB Information Today, Inc
PP Medford, NJ
SN 1573870307

RT Journal
ID 3032
A1 Cronin,Blaise
T1 A cast of thousands: coauthorship and subauthorship collaboration in 
the 20th century as manifested in the scholarly journal literature of 
psychology and philosophy
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2003
VO 54
IS 9
SP 855
OP 871
AB We chronicle the use of acknowledgments in 20th-century scholarship 
by analyzing and classifying more than 4,500 specimens covering a 100-
year period. Our results show that the intensity of acknowledgment 
varies by discipline, reflecting differences in prevailing 
sociocognitive structures and work practices. We demonstrate that the 
acknowledgment has gradually established itself as a constitutive 
element of academic writing, one that provides a revealing insight into 
the nature and extent of subauthorship collaboration. Complementary 
data on rates of coauthorship are also presented to highlight the 
growing importance of collaboration and the increasing division of 
labor in contemporary research and scholarship.
NO ID: 823
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/104530748/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3031
A1 Cronin,Blaise
T1 Hyperauthorship: a postmodern perversion or evidence of a structural 
shift in scholarly communication practices?
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2001
VO 52
IS 7
SP 558
OP 569
AB Classical assumptions about the nature and ethical entailments of 
authorship (the standard model) are being challenged by developments in 
scientific collaboration and multiple authorship. In the biomedical 
research community, multiple authorship has increased to such an extent 
that the trustworthiness of the scientific communication system has 
been called into question. Documented abuses, such as honorific 
authorship, have serious implications in terms of the acknowledgment of 
authority, allocation of credit, and assigning of accountability. 
Within the biomedical world it has been proposed that authors be 
replaced by lists of contributors (the radical model), whose specific 
inputs to a given study would be recorded unambiguously. The wider 
implications of the hyperauthorship phenomenon for scholarly 
publication are considered.
NO ID: 822
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/78002288/ABSTRACT

RT Book, Whole
ID 3033
A1 Cronin,Blaise
A1 Atkins,Helen Barsky
A1 Atkins,Helen Barsky
T1 The web of knowledge : a festschrift in honor of Eugene Garfield
YR 2000
AB Historical Perspectives Chapter 1: Eugene Garfield: History, 
Scientific Information and Chemical Endeavor Arnold Thackray and David 
C. Brock 11 Chapter 2: How the Science Citation Index Got Started 
Joshua Lederberg 25 Chapter 3: Garfield as Alchemist Paul Wouters 65 
Chapter 4: Assessing the Value of a Database Company Robert M. Hayes 73 
The Scientific Literature Chapter 5: The Growth of Journal Literature: 
A Historical Perspective Jack Meadows 87 Chapter 6: The Role of 
Journals in the Growth of Scientific Knowledge Stephen Cole 109 Chapter 
7: Scholarly Communication and Bibliometrics Revisted Christine L. 
Borgman 143 Chapter 8: Publication Velocity, Publication Growth and 
Impact Factor: An Empirical Model Péter Vinkler 163 Chapter 9: 
Visualizing Citation Connections Tony Cawkell 177 International Issues 
Chapter 10: Collaboration Networks in Science María Bordons and Isabel 
Gómez 197 Chapter 11: International Collaboration in Science: The Case 
of India and China Subbiah Arunachalam 215 Chapter 12: Publication 
Indicators in Latin America Revisited Jane M. Russell 233 Chapter 13: 
How Balanced is the Science Citation Index's Journal Coverage? A 
Preliminary Overview of Macro-Level Statistical Data Tibor Braun, 
Wolfgang Glänzel and András Schubert 251 Evaluative Bibliometrics 
Chapter 14: A Short History of the Use of Citations as a Measure of the 
Impact of Scientific and Scholarly Work Jonathan R. Cole 281 Chapter 
15: The Pandora's Box of Citation Analysis: Measuring Scientific 
Excellence - the Last Evil? Anthony F. J. van Raan 301 Chapter 16: The 
Complementarity of Scientometrics and Economics Arthur M. Diamond, Jr. 
321 Chapter 17: The Development of Science Indicators in the United 
States Francis Narin, Kimberly S. Hamilton and Dominic Olivastro 337 
Chapter 18: Citations as a Means to Evaluate Biomedical Research Grant 
Lewison 361 Chapter 19: Applying Diachronic Citation Analysis to 
Research Program Evaluations Peter Ingwersen, Birger Larsen and Irene 
Wormell 373 Chapter 20: Scientometrics, Cybermetrics, and Firm 
Performance Michael E. D. Koenig and Mary Westermann-Cicio 389 Chapter 
21: Do Patent Citations Count? Charles Oppenheim 405 Social Network 
Analysis Chapter 22: On the Garfield Input to the Sociology of Science: 
A Retrospective Collage Robert K. Merton 435 Chapter 23: Charting 
Pathways through Science: Exploring Garfield's vision of a Unified 
Index to Science Henry Small 449 Chapter 24: Toward Ego-Centered 
Citation Analysis Howard D. White 475 Chapter 25: Graphing Micro-
Regions in the Web of Knowledge: A Comparative Reference-Network 
Analysis Lowell L. Hargens 497 Chapter 26: The Citation Network as a 
Prototype for Representing Trust in Virtual Environments Elisabeth 
Davenport and Blaise Cronin 517
NO ID: 380
PB Information TodayCronin, Blaise
PP Medford, NJ
SN 1573870994
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1573870994

RT Journal
ID 3034
A1 Cronin,Blaise
A1 Shaw,Debora
A1 La Barre,Kathryn
T1 Visible, less visible, and invisible work: Patterns of collaboration 
in 20th century chemistry
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 2
SP 160
OP 168
AB We chronicle the use of acknowledgments in 20th century chemistry by 
analyzing and classifying over 2,000 specimens covering a 100-year 
period. Our results show that acknowledgment has gradually established 
itself as a constitutive element of academic writing - one that 
provides a revealing insight into the structural nature of 
subauthorship collaboration in science. Complementary data on rates of 
coauthorship are also presented to highlight the growing importance of 
teamwork and the increasing division of labor in contemporary 
chemistry. The results of this study are compared with the findings of 
a parallel study of collaboration in both the social sciences and the 
humanities.
NO ID: 657
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106562428/ABSTRACT

RT Book, Whole
ID 3035
A1 Crosbie,Michael J.
A1 Hickey,Damon D. Hickey
T1 When change is set in stone : an analysis of seven academic 
libraries by Perry Dean Rogers & Partners
YR 2001
SP 102
AB Factors affecting the construction of new academic libraries -- 
Questions and tips for the planner -- Libraries. Wyndham Robertson 
Library, Hollins University -- Health Sciences and Human Services 
Library, University of Maryland-Baltimore -- Flo K. Gault Library for 
Independent Study, The College of Wooster -- Waidner Library, Dickinson 
College -- Morgan Library, Colorado State University -- Timken Science 
Library, The College of Wooster -- John Deaver Drinko Library, Marshall 
University.
NO ID: 673
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Chicago
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0838981364

RT Journal
ID 3036
A1 Crotteau,Mark
T1 Support for Biological Research by an Academic Library: A Journal 
Citation Study
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 1997
FD 1997
VO 17
IS 1
SP 67
OP 86
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Biology
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Library Collections
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Access to Information
K1 College Faculty
K1 Higher Education
K1 Library Materials
K1 Periodicals
K1 Publications
K1 Reference Materials
K1 Research
AB Purpose of this study was to examine whether data collected locally 
by biology faculty at a large research university may provide a better 
indicator of journals they value than data compiled over a broad 
geographic area, to relate those journal issues cited by faculty to the 
holdings of the library, and to determine how faculty access articles 
published in journals not held by the library. (AEF)
NO EJ566480; 0194-262X(1997)17:12.0.TX;2-U Journal availability: The 
Haworth Press, Inc., 10 Alice St., Binghamton, NY 13904-1580. English 
0194-262X 1997 67 1997 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR537407 CIJJAN1999 080 
Journal Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 405

RT Journal
ID 3037
A1 Curtis,Donnelyn
A1 Stoll,Karen S.
T1 Partners in supporting science: academic and government research 
libraries Alliance for Innovation in Science and Technology Information
JF Government Information Quarterly
YR 2000
FD 2000article feature article
VO 17
IS 3
SP 291
OP 298
K1 Descriptor: Cooperation -- Scientific and technical libraries.
K1 Cooperation -- Western States
NO ID: 279

RT Journal
ID 3038
A1 Curtis,K. L.
A1 Weller,A. C.
T1 Information-seeking behavior: a survey of health sciences faculty 
use of indexes and databases
JF Bull Med Libr Assoc
JO Bull.Med.Libr.Assoc.
YR 1993
FD Oct
VO 81
IS 4
SP 383
OP 392
K1 (Major): Library Surveys
K1 Reference Books
K1 (Minor): CD-ROM
K1 Chicago
K1 Faculty -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Faculty, Medical -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Faculty, Nursing -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Human
K1 Information Systems -- utilization
K1 Libraries, Medical -- utilization
K1 MEDLINE -- utilization
K1 Schools, Medical -- statistics & numerical data
AB This study investigated information-seeking behavior, including use 
of major bibliographic tools by medical, pharmacy, nursing, and science 
faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The study assessed 
the impact of availability of locally mounted databases, determined 
needs for modification of instructional programs, identified the need 
for promotional material, and established a baseline for subsequent 
studies. Results reflected a wide variation in the number and format of 
secondary services used by faculty. Over 70% of all faculty from the 
colleges of medicine, pharmacy, and nursing used Index Medicus or 
MEDLINE. There were statistically significant differences between 
colleges in their use of mediated and end-user searching of MEDLINE. 
Colleges exhibited significant differences in use of Current Contents, 
PsycLIT, ERIC, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature 
(CINAHL), Chemical Abstracts, and Science Citation Index. Statistically 
significant differences also were found among several clinical 
departments. The study concluded that, as new formats to bibliographic 
tools become available, traditional formats continue to be used; 
training sessions must be tailored to the audience; and the 
availability of local resources and their use by faculty needs to be 
understood.
NO PMID: 8251974; Medline: 94073116 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 
0025-7338; NLM Unique Journal Identifier: 0421037 English Index Medicus 
Journal Article Citation: Status: Completed Owner: NLM; ID: 436
AD Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago 
60612.

RT Journal
ID 3039
A1 Curtis,K. L.
A1 Weller,Ann C.
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 Information-seeking behavior of health sciences faculty: the impact 
of new information technologies
JF Bull Med Libr Assoc
JO Bull.Med.Libr.Assoc.
YR 1997
FD Oct
VO 85
IS 4
SP 402
OP 410
K1 (Minor): CD-ROM -- utilization
K1 Chi-Square Distribution
K1 Computer Communication Networks -- utilization
K1 Computer User Training
K1 Data Collection
K1 Faculty -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Faculty, Medical -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Faculty, Nursing -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Grateful Med -- utilization
K1 Illinois
K1 Information Storage and Retrieval -- utilization
K1 MEDLINE -- utilization
K1 Online Systems -- utilization
K1 Questionnaires
AB This paper reports on an ongoing investigation into health sciences 
faculty's information-seeking behavior, including their use of new 
information technologies. A survey was administered to all faculty in 
medicine, nursing, and pharmacy at the University of Illinois at 
Chicago. It was similar to one administered to the same population in 
1991. The survey asked about faculty's use of electronic resources, 
documented any shift from the use of print to electronic formats, and 
measured the utilization of library training. The response rate was 
48.5% for medicine faculty, 45.0% for nursing, and 62.5% for pharmacy. 
The study found that use of the print Index Medicus among faculty was 
in transition: While 30.5% continued to use the print resources, 68.0% 
of faculty accessed MEDLINE through electronic means. Faculty preferred 
accessing electronic databases from their offices to doing so from the 
library. Health sciences faculty used a wide variety of databases, in 
addition to MEDLINE, to fill their information needs. Most faculty did 
not take advantage of either in-house or electronic training sessions 
offered by librarians. The study concluded that the training 
preferences of faculty need to be further explored.
NO PMID: 9431430; Medline: 98093458 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 
0025-7338; NLM Unique Journal Identifier: 0421037 English Index Medicus 
Journal Article Citation: Status: Completed Owner: NLM; ID: 435
AD Library of the Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago 
60612, USA.

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3040
A1 Davis,H.
A1 McManus,P.
T1 The open hypermedia approach to information organisation
YR 1995
K1 cognitive models, information spaces, time management,
NO ID: 97
T2 IEE Colloquium on Information Overload
PB IEE

RT Journal
ID 3048
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 Who's to Blame for Article Duplication
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2005
VO 5
IS 2
SP 149
OP 150
AB portal: Libraries and the Academy began life due to many concerns 
about scholarly journal publication. The following is an invited 
editorial. The concerns raised by the recent revelations of multiple 
publication of articles by Emerald/MCB University Press inspired a 
desire to offer our readership the thoughts of one of our own editorial 
board members. Mr. Davis' research uncovered this duplication, and here 
he provides us—as a profession—with some serious questions about our 
role and responsibilities in resisting this practice.
NO ID: 806
UL 
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v005/5.2d
avis.html

RT Journal
ID 3045
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 Fair Publisher Pricing, Confidentiality Clauses and a Proposal to 
Even the Economic Playing Field
JF D-Lib Magazine
YR 2004
VO 10
IS 2
AB Fair pricing requires transparency in the marketplace. The use of 
confidentiality clauses may result in higher prices for all library 
consumers. This opinion piece advocates for the construction of a 
publicly available, SPARC and ARL endorsed database through which 
libraries can share price and licensing details. This article is based 
on a plenary speech at the Charleston Conference on Collection 
Development, November 7, 2003.
NO ID: 605
UL http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february04/davis/02davis.html

RT Journal
ID 3046
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 Information-seeking behavior of chemists: A transaction log analysis 
of referral URLs
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 4
SP 326
OP 332
AB This study reports an analysis of referral URL data by the Cornell 
University IP address from the American Chemical Society servers. The 
goal of this work is to better understand the tools used and pathways 
taken when scientists connect to electronic journals. While various 
methods of referral were identified in this study, most individuals 
were referred infrequently and followed few and consistent pathways 
each time they connected. The relationship between the number and types 
of referrals followed an inverse-square law. Whereas the majority of 
referrals came from established finding tools (library catalog, library 
e-journal list, and bibliographic databases), a substantial number of 
referrals originated from generic Web searches. Scientists are also 
relying on local alternatives or substitutes such as departmental or 
personal Web pages with lists of linked publications. The use of 
electronic mail as a method to refer scientists directly to online 
articles may be greatly underestimated. Implications for the 
development of redundant library services such as e-journal lists and 
the practice of publishers to allow linking from other resources are 
discussed.
NO ID: 654
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106566738/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3047
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 Letter to the Editor: Transfer from print to electronic serials
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 4
SP 369
OP 371
AB In response to the article, Making the Transition from Print to 
Electronic Serial Collections: A New Model for Academic Chemistry 
Libraries? by Tina E. Chrzastowski (JASIST, 54(12):1141-1148). The 
author provides a back-of-the-envelope cost/use calculation of $11.24 
for Elsevier's journals and compares this number to the cost of 
interlibrary loan of $30/article and concludes with a consent that this 
price is within reason [to pay] for a commercial publisher. Quick 
calculations like this can be both grossly inaccurate and wildly 
misleading. There are several unstated and undefendable assumptions 
that went into the author's calculations.
NO ID: 684
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106599380/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3043
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 Effect of the Web on Undergraduate Citation Behavior: Guiding 
Student Scholarship in a Networked Age
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2003
VO 3
IS 1
SP 41
OP 51
AB Discusses the effect of the Internet on undergraduate citation 
behavior. Results of the study on the research behavior of a multi-
college undergraduate course from 1996 to 2001; Impact of the Web on 
student term paper bibliographies; Accuracy and persistency of Web 
documents.
NO ID: 549

RT Journal
ID 3044
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 An IP-level analysis of usage statistics for electronic journals in 
chemistry: Making inferences about user behavior
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2003
VO 54
IS 11
SP 1062
OP 1068
AB This study reports an analysis of American Chemical Society 
electronic journal downloads at Cornell University by individual IP 
addresses. While the majority of users (IPs) limited themselves to a 
small number of both journals and article downloads, a small minority 
of heavy users had a large effect on total journal downloads. There was 
a very strong relationship between the number of article downloads and 
the number of users, implying that a user-population can be estimated 
by just knowing the total use of a journal. Aggregate users (i.e. 
Library Proxy Server and public library computers) can be regarded as a 
sub-sample of the entire user population. Analysis of article downloads 
by format (PDF versus HTML) suggests that individuals are using the 
system like a networked photocopier, for the purposes of creating 
print-on-demand copies of articles.
NO ID: 683
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/104537254/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3041
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 The Effect of the Web on Undergraduate Citation Behavior: A 2000 
Update
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2002
VO 63
IS 1
SP 53
OP 60
NO ID: 481

RT Journal
ID 3042
A1 Davis,Philip M.
T1 Where to Spend our E-journal Money? Defining a University Library's 
Core Collection Through Citation Analysis
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2002
VO 2
IS 1
SP 155
OP 166
AB This paper identifies core journals in the life sciences for Cornell 
University researchers by analyzing the frequency of Cornell-authored 
citations in Biosis Previews between 1996 and 2001. The distribution 
frequency of journals confirms Bradford's Law of Scatter or the 80/20 
Rule. The top 240 journals, providing 80 percent of the citations, were 
analyzed by publisher type and institutional subscription price. In 
general, journals from society and associations received the highest 
number of citations and were priced considerably lower than commercial 
journals. The methodology described is a fast, low-cost, and scalable 
procedure that can be adapted to various subject databases, and may be 
used to provide guidance on which titles to purchase for electronic 
access.
NO ID: 740
UL 
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v002/2.1d
avis.html

RT Journal
ID 3049
A1 Davis,Philip M.
A1 Cohen,Suzanne A.
T1 The Effect of the Web on Undergraduate Citation Behavior 1996-99
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology :JASIST
YR 2001
VO 52
IS 4
SP 309
OP 314
AB Davis and Cohen collected 68 undergraduate student [Cornell 
University] microeconomic term papers from 1996 and 69 from 1999 and 
extracted the bibliographies. These were coded as book, journal, 
magazine, newspaper, Web, other, or unidentifiable. Web source 
citations were verified online to see if they still existed and were 
classed as: found directly, not found directly but found elsewhere, 
found after correcting a typographical error, and not found (after a 
site and Google search). The average number of citations increased form 
11.6 in 1996 to 11.9 in 1999. The mean number of journals and magazines 
did not change significantly. Overall median citations increased form 
10 to 12. Book citations dropped from 30% to 19%, Web citation went 
from 9% to 21%, and newspapers increased form 7% to 16%. There was a 
significant decline in the use of books and journals in favor of the 
use of newspapers and magazines interpreted as a decline in the use of 
scholarly materials. For 1999 URLs, 55% went directly to a cited 
document, 19% were found elsewhere, and 10% contained errors. 16% were 
not found. Of the 1996 citations only 18% of the URLs still led 
directly to the cited document, 26%were found elsewhere, 3% had errors 
and 53% could not be found. The authors believe stricter guidelines for 
acceptable citations are called for, as is the creation of scholarly 
portals, and increased instruction on resource evaluation.
NO ID: 358

RT Journal
ID 3050
A1 Dawson,Alan
T1 Inferring User Behaviour from Journal Access Figures
JF Serials Librarian
YR 1999
VO 35
IS 3
SP 31
OP 41
AB Article from The Serials Librarian which outlines different methods 
of measuring usage of electronic journals, suggests that different 
types of access may be mapped to the user activities of browsing, 
reading and searching, and draws inferences about why different titles 
have different patterns of usage, eg whether they are primarily used 
for research and reference, current awareness or casual browsing.
NO ID: 811

RT Journal
ID 3051
A1 De Groote,Sandra L.
A1 Dorsch,Josephine L.
T1 Measuring use patterns of online journals and databases
JF Journal of the Medical Library Association
YR 2003
VO 91
IS 2
SP 231
OP 240
AB Purpose: This research sought to determine use of online biomedical 
journals and databases and to assess current user characteristics 
associated with the use of online resources in an academic health 
sciences center. Setting: The Library of the Health Sciences–Peoria is 
a regional site of the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Library 
with 350 print journals, more than 4,000 online journals, and multiple 
online databases. Methodology: A survey was designed to assess online 
journal use, print journal use, database use, computer literacy levels, 
and other library user characteristics. A survey was sent through 
campus mail to all (471) UIC Peoria faculty, residents, and students. 
Results: Forty-one percent (188) of the surveys were returned. Ninety-
eight percent of the students, faculty, and residents reported having 
convenient access to a computer connected to the Internet. While 53% of 
the users indicated they searched MEDLINE at least once a week, other 
databases showed much lower usage. Overall, 71% of respondents 
indicated a preference for online over print journals when possible. 
Conclusions: Users prefer online resources to print, and many choose to 
access these online resources remotely. Convenience and full-text 
availability appear to play roles in selecting online resources. The 
findings of this study suggest that databases without links to full 
text and online journal collections without links from bibliographic 
databases will have lower use. These findings have implications for 
collection development, promotion of library resources, and end-user 
training.
NO ID: 692
UL 
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=153164&action=str
eam&blobtype=pdf

RT Report
ID 3052
A1 De Rosa,Cathy
A1 Cantrell,Joanne
A1 Cellentani,Diane
A1 Hawk,Janet
A1 Jenkins,Lillie
A1 Wilson,Alane
T1 Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources
YR 2005
AB Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources (2005) summarizes 
findings of an international study on information-seeking habits and 
preferences. With extensive input from hundreds of librarians and OCLC 
staff, the OCLC Market Research team developed a project and 
commissioned Harris Interactive Inc. to survey a representative sample 
of information consumers. In June of 2005, we collected over 3,300 
responses from information consumers in Australia, Canada, India, 
Singapore, the United Kingdom and the United States. The Perceptions 
report provides the findings and responses from the online survey in an 
effort to learn more about: Library use, Awareness and use of library 
electronic resources, The Internet search engine, the library and the 
librarian, Free vs. for-fee information, The "Library" brand The 
findings indicate that information consumers view libraries as places 
to borrow print books, but they are unaware of the rich electronic 
content they can access through libraries. Even though information 
consumers make limited use of these resources, they continue to trust 
libraries as reliable sources of information.
NO ID: 876
T3 Tertiary Perceptions of Libraries and Information Resources
UL http://www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm

RT Journal
ID 3701
A1 De Smet,E.
T1 Information Behaviour in a Scientific-Technical Environment: A 
Survey with Innovation Engineers
JF Scientometrics
YR 1992
VO 25
IS 1
SP 101-113
AB A small written survey with innovation engineers in a large company 
is discussed, giving some figures on both behaviour and attitudes with 
respect to 1) information gathering, 2) information 
production/dissemination and 3) information storage and management. 
Most results confirm the trends in other research with R & D engineers: 
the use and management of information is rather improvised with low 
levels of sophistication. High tech information techniques (databases, 
online...) are only marginally important in this high-tech environment. 
Only younger engineers do some structured efforts. The general attitude 
is to rely mostly on oral, personal and occasional information sources. 
By combining positive attitudes and behaviour aspects towards 
information in the job, a measure of 'information-orientation' was 
constructed, which can be seen as an extension of the classical concept 
of 'gate-keepers' in a company. A few questions to reconstruct a 
'critical incident' with respect to information problems reveal that 
information situations can be very time- and money-consuming but again 
solutions depend on occasional and unstructured information work. 
However the restricted written approach did not prove to be a good one 
for this kind of analysis. More in-depth interview-techniques will be 
necessary for analysis within the 'critical incident theory'-frame.

RT Journal
ID 3053
A1 Deis,Louise F.
A1 Goodman,David
T1 Web of Science (2004 version) and Scopus
JF Charleston Advisor
YR 2005
VO 6
IS 3
SP 5
OP 21
AB Since Web of Science is the more familiar product, it will be 
discussed first for each point. A discussion of Scopus will follow, and 
then a comparison of the two products. Some common and satisfactory 
elements will be treated in summary fashion. Most details of exactly 
how to use specific features in each product are thoroughly treated in 
the online Help, and need not be discussed in detail in this review, 
but we will emphasize necessary details that the Help omits. Scopus was 
released on November 10, 2004, after widely publicized beta trials at a 
few universities. In our opinion, the underlying data is not as 
complete as other products usually released by major vendors. 
Nonetheless, because of the great interest in this database, it is 
being reviewed on the basis of the content and other features available 
on the date of the release. When the publisher demonstrates that the 
basic data has been loaded, we will reevaluate the product.
NO ID: 555
UL http://www.charlestonco.com/comp.cfm?id=43

RT Journal
ID 3054
A1 Delamothe,Tony
T1 Is that it? How online articles have changed over the past five 
years
JF BMJ
JO BMJ
YR 2002
VO 325
IS 7378
SP 1475
OP 1478
AB Five years ago BMJ readers responded to the challenge of predicting 
what online articles would look like in the future in five general 
medical journals. Has the development of electronic publishing lived up 
to their predictions? Our 1997 Christmas issue carried several 
descriptions of what an online scientific article would look like by 
now.1 We asked readers for their predictions and promised a prize, 
based on comparisons with contemporary articles "appearing in online 
versions of the Annals of Internal Medicine, BMJ, JAMA, Lancet, and New 
England Journal of Medicine (should they still exist)." These five 
general medical journals still exist. While all now have full text 
online versions, you'd be hard pressed to see much change in their 
articles over the past five years. Nevertheless, on closer inspection, 
vague hints of change are detectable, although for their full blooded 
realisation you'll need to look elsewhere.
NO ID: 797
UL http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/325/7378/1475

RT Journal
ID 3055
A1 Delendick,Thomas J.
T1 Citation analysis of the literature of systematic botany: a 
preliminary survey
JF J Am Soc Inf Sci
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.
YR 1990
FD Oct.
VO 41
IS 7
SP 535
OP 543
K1 Descriptor: Citation analysis.
K1 Biological literature -- Evaluation
AB A preliminary citation analysis of the literature of systematic 
botany (plant taxonomy) was based on 1986 issues of Brittonia, 
Systematic Botany, and Taxon. These three journals together covered the 
three facets of systematic activity: alpha-taxonomy, beta-taxonomy, and 
phylogeny. The three journals included 164 papers, of which 105 dealt 
specifically with taxonomy or nomenclature, and cited a total of 53 
theses, 804 book titles, and 567 journal titles. Nonbook citations 
totaled 1055 (698 from the exclusively taxonomic papers); journal 
citations numbered 2088 (1168 from taxonomic works). The decade with 
the greatest number of citations was 1977-1986, but the proportion of 
older citations was much higher than what would be expected for 
scientific literature. The list of titles is highly diversified, 
reflecting the nature of systematic botany. Internal citations 
(citations accompanying lists of nomenclatural synonymies but not 
repeated in the Literature Cited section) account for 11% (4-23%) of 
the total number of journal titles, 11% (5-20%) of the journal 
citations, and 23% (3-33%) of the book titles cited. In order to 
recover 80% of the relevant citations in botany (determined from the 
total citation count), one would need to obtain 34% of the titles; for 
systematic botany specifically, 60% of the journal titles would be 
required. Comparatively few of the titles cited in these three journals 
(ca. 6%) are included in the subject list for botany in the Science 
Citation Index, whereas approximately 59% are covered by Biological 
Abstracts. This helps account for the preference of systematic 
botanists for the Abstracts in doing literature searches. Invisible 
colleges, subject specialization based on plant families/genera, and 
the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature all have important 
roles in determining the literature requirements and idiosyncrasies of 
publication in the field.
NO BLIB91004554 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0002-8231 Details: 
bibl charts. article feature article; ID: 480

RT Journal
ID 3056
A1 D'Elia,George
A1 Jorgensen,Corinne
A1 Woelfel,Joseph
A1 Rodger,Eleanor Jo
T1 The Impact of the Internet on Public Library Use: An Analysis of the 
Current Consumer Market for Library and Internet Services
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology :JASIST
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 10Similar Paper also presented at the ASIST (American Society for 
Information Science and Technology) Annual Meeting (64th, Washington, 
DC, November 3-8, 2001).
SP 802
OP 820
K1 Internet
K1 Public Libraries
K1 Use Studies
K1 Users (Information)
K1 Comparative Analysis
K1 Data Analysis
K1 Information Sources
K1 Trend Analysis
K1 User Needs (Information)
AB Describes a research project designed to provide baseline data on 
the relationship between people's use of the public library and use of 
the Internet. A national survey was conducted to estimate the number of 
people using the library, the Internet, both, or neither, and to 
describe behaviors of people in each segment related to use or nonuse 
of the library and/or the Internet.
NO ID: 381

RT Journal
ID 3057
A1 Dellavalle,Robert P.
A1 al.,et
T1 Going, Going, Gone: Lost Internet References
JF Science
JO Science
YR 2003
VO 302
IS 5646This is in the "Information Science" column.
SP 787
OP 788
AB Internet references in medical and scientific periodicals may become 
more common as 7 million pages of new information, including data not 
available elsewhere, appear daily on the World Wide Web (WWW). The 
Internet, of which the Web is part, consists of a worldwide system of 
computer networks. The Internet promotes easy access to and revision of 
data and allows information formats not suitable for print media 
including high-resolution images, motion video, animations, 
simulations, and program source code. However, unlike hard copy 
references, Internet references may change and become inaccessible
NO ID: 580
UL http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/302/5646/787

RT Journal
ID 3058
A1 DeLyser,Ronald R.
A1 al.,et
T1 Creating a student centered learning environment at the University 
of Denver
JF Journal of Engineering Education
JO J Eng Educ
YR 2003
VO 92
IS 3
SP 269
OP 273
AB The Engineering Department at the University of Denver (DU) has 
undergraduate programs in Computer (CpE), Electrical (EE), Mechanical 
(ME) and General Engineering. The curricula are devised to provide 
students the ability to assume leadership roles in multidisciplinary 
fields. For the first two years the programs of study are common; all 
students take the same courses that are replete with hands-on 
experiences.
NO ID: 595

RT Journal
ID 3059
A1 Dempsey,Kathy
T1 Does Your Manager Know?
JF Computers in Libraries
YR 2001
VO 21
IS 8
SP 6
AB This is the editor's introduction to the theme of the issue, "Using 
Technology to Promote Your Library. Are you doing it?"
NO ID: 301
UL http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/sep01/ednotes.htm

RT Journal
ID 3060
A1 Denning,Peter J.
T1 A new social contract for research
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 23 pages.
SP 132
OP 134
K1 r&d
K1 Research centers
K1 Innovations
K1 Colleges & universities
K1 Future
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (5400) Research & development
K1 (8306) Schools & educational services
AB The founder of the University of Berlin, Wilhelm Von Humboldt, did 
the most to promote universities as places of research. During World 
War II, the US government offered contracts to some universities for 
research helpful to the war effort. This practice was institutionalized 
with the creation of the National Science Foundation in 1950 and the 
Advanced Research Projects Agency in the early 1960s. Yet something has 
happened to tarnish the image of research in universities. Despite its 
many successes, 2 major problems with academic research carry 
considerable weight among federal lawmakers who question whether the 
massive spending on university research produces the value claimed. One 
problem is the publish or perish syndrome, which tends to stress 
quantity over quality. The second problem is that research does not 
conform to the linear model envisaged by early proponent Vannevar Bush. 
Information technology also threatens academic research. Focusing on 
innovations, the ultimate value of research, may be the answer.
NO ID: 108

RT Journal
ID 3061
A1 Devin,Robin B.
T1 Who's using what?
JF Libr Acquis
YR 1989
FD '89
VO 13
IS 2
SP 167
OP 170
K1 Descriptor: College and university libraries -- Serial publications.
K1 Use studies -- Serial publications.
K1 Citation analysis.
K1 Genre/Form: Speech
AB Researchers' citations of serials; presented at the 1988 Charleston 
conference on acquisitions. Lists the percentage of serial use by 
subject areas and disciplines, including chemistry, microbiology, 
physics, geology, astronomy, medicine, botany, mathematics, technology, 
library science, medicine, etc.
NO BLIB89011340 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0364-6408 article 
speech; ID: 441

RT Journal
ID 3062
A1 Dewdney,Patricia
A1 Mitchell,Gillian
T1 Oranges and Peaches: Understanding Communication Accidents in the 
Reference Interview
JF RQ
YR 1996
VO 35
IS 4
SP 520
K1 Discusses communication accidents, and looks at ways to assist 
librarians in understanding the linguistic reasons for common input 
failures. Information on learning communications strategies designed to 
avert or repair these accidents
K1 How most communication accidents arise
K1 Examples of communication accidents
K1 Strategies for dealing with these accidents
NO ID: 649

RT Journal
ID 3063
A1 Diaz,Joseph R.
A1 Pintozzi,Chestalene
T1 Helping teams work: lessons learned from the University of Arizona 
library reorganization
JF Library Administation and Management
YR 1999
VO 13
IS 1
NO ID: 190

RT Journal
ID 3064
A1 Dilevko,Juris
A1 Harris,Roma M.
T1 Information technology and social relations: Portrayals of gender 
roles in high tech product advertisements
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1997
VO 48
IS 8
SP 718
OP 727
AB Advertisements for technology products were sampled from 
professional journals in the fields of business, computing 
science/engineering, and library and information science. Content 
analyses revealed that men are portrayed in the ads more frequently 
than women, although the distribution of male and female figures in 
various poses is more egalitarian in ads found in traditional library 
journals. The depictions of male and female roles in relation to 
technology is largely stereotypic. Men are often portrayed as deep 
thinkers who are connected to the future, whereas women are often 
present in ads in order to convey the notion of simplicity of product 
use.
NO ID: 238
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/39743/START

RT Journal
ID 3065
A1 Dillon,Irma F.
A1 Hahn,Karla L.
T1 Are Researchers Ready for the Electronic-Only Journal Collection? 
Results of a Survey at the University of Maryland
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2002
VO 2
IS 3
SP 375
OP 390
AB This article discusses a web-based survey conducted by the 
University of Maryland Libraries in the spring of 2001. The survey was 
distributed among university faculty and graduate students to determine 
their views on and use of electronic journals. Staff at the Libraries 
hoped to discover information that would suggest how best to manage 
collections to serve the university community efficiently. The survey 
adds two new dimensions to previous studies of electronic journal 
usage. First, it examines the respondents' current use of print 
journals in library collections and second, distinguishes between 
respondents' format preferences for those journals that are most 
central to their research and teaching activities as well as less 
important titles.
NO ID: 695
UL 
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v002/2.3h
ahn.html

RT Journal
ID 3066
A1 Dixon,Anne
T1 The Wannabee Culture: Why No-one Does What They Used To Do
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 1998
K1 IOP Publishing Ltd.
K1 Publishers and publishing Scientific and technical literature.
K1 Electronic publishing
AB Electronic publishing has been an agent for change in not just how 
one publishes, but in what one publishes. There is an increasing 
fluidity between what used to be ring-fenced sectors. This paper 
describes one publisher's attempt to move into another publishing 
category, and why.
NO ID: 135

RT Journal
ID 3067
A1 do Amaral,Sueli Angelica
T1 What Library Managers Know about Marketing: A Study of Brazilian 
Geoscience and Mineral Technology Libraries
JF Information Development
YR 1992
VO 8
IS 2
SP 90
OP 94
AB The not-so-surprising conclusion is that the majority of sci/tech 
library managers in Brazil are not acquainted with nor have much 
training in marketing. This "limitation imposes restrictions on the 
activities developed by the information sector, acting as a barrier to 
complete development."
NO ID: 302

RT Journal
ID 3068
A1 Dodd,Jeff
A1 Forys,John
A1 Dewey,Barbara I.
T1 Renovating Science Branch Libraries: Two Different Paths
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 2000
VO 19
IS 1
SP 39
OP 47
AB The building and renovation of two science branch libraries within 
larger University building projects, Biological Sciences and 
Engineering, provides an interesting case study of remarkably different 
experiences and approaches at the same institution during the same time 
period. Successful planning of library facilities is described to be 
more than spatial work. The article outlines approaches and experiences 
including strategic planning, effects of changing disciplines, 
political maneuvering, and persistent attention to detail. A set of 
principles for surviving building projects of this nature is presented 
as well as lessons learned.
NO ID: 544
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v19n01_04&i=1&s=J122&v=19

RT Book, Section
ID 3069
A1 Doty,Philip
A1 Bishop,Ann P.
A1 McClure,Charles R.
T1 Scientific norms and the use of electronic research networks
YR 1991
SP 24
OP 38
K1 Descriptor: Use studies -- Information networks
NO BLIB92006798 Provider: OCLC; bibl. 0938734563 Related Record: 
blib92006375 English analytic; ID: 453
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (54th :1991 
:Washington, D.C.). ASIS '91 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Journal
ID 3070
A1 Drey,Jenny
T1 How People Actually Search: Chemistry Web Users Tell us Their Views
JF CINF E-News
YR 2002
VO 3
IS 2 Spring
AB A recent survey conducted by DK Associates provided some excellent 
pointers as to how end users search and what sites help them in which 
aspects of their jobs. Over 1300 chemists across the world and across a 
range of disciplines answered an online questionnaire which shed new 
light on their searching habits. One of the sections of the 
questionnaire asked which of 11 different chemistry websites they used 
in their work, how often and why.
NO ID: 345
UL http://www-sul.stanford.edu/depts/swain/cinf/enews/JennyDrey.htm

RT Journal
ID 3071
A1 Drum,Carol
A1 Ashcraft,John
T1 Chemists Doing Library Research - AD 2000
JF Journal of chemical education
JO J.Chem.Educ.
YR 2000
VO 77
IS 1
SP 23
OP 24
AB A humorous look at a cartoon that was published in the October 1951 
issue of the Journal.
NO ID: 607
UL http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/2000/Jan/abs23.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 3072
A1 Dubois,J. E. (Jaques-Emile)
A1 Gershon,Nahum
A1 Gershon,Nahum
T1 Data and Knowledge in a changing world; The information revolution: 
impact on science and technology
YR 1996
SP 273
AB Obstacles to a Free or Fair Circulation of Scientific Data, André 
Heck: A Few Facets of the Kaleidoscope of Scientific Information. (The 
recent dramatic information technology evolution has brought major 
modifications in the way information is handled with new techniques and 
new tools. This paper will question a few clich'es and deal with a 
number of newly resulting problems and challenges, especially ethical, 
legal and educational ones. The long-term impact of interdisciplinary 
approaches should be emphasized in the global information technology 
(IT) evolution and web-like telecommunications.) 71-82 Michael J. 
Kurtz, Günther Eichhorn, Stephen S. Murray, Carolyn Stern-Grant, 
Alberto Accomazzi: The NASA Astrophysics Data System: A Heterogeneous 
Distributed Data Environment. (NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a 
distributed information system which provides access to archive, 
catalog and bibliographic data in astronomy. because of recent 
technical and budgetary developments the ADS has become a smaller 
project and changed its focus. While continuing to provide access to 
certain archives and databases te ADS will substantially expand its 
already extensive bibliographic service to include the whole text of 
articles from the major journals in astronomy; it will thus become a 
major digital library. ) 123-130 Numerical, Textual and Image Databases 
-- Eberhard R. Hilf, Bernd Diekmann, Heinrich Stamerjohanns, Jacob 
Curdes: Integrated Information Management for Physics. (The change of 
document handling from printed on paper to fully electronic handling 
throughout is described in terms of a phase transition. The present 
actions and plans of the German Physical Society are given. The 
embedding into international and interdisciplinary actions are stressed 
upon. Some examples of present experiments and projects are given. In 
somewhat more detail a distributed data base for large molecular mass 
spectra is given.) 189-196
NO ID: 859
PB Springer-VerlagDubois, J. E. (Jaques-Emile)
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i3540608559

RT Journal
ID 3073
A1 Duy,Joanna
A1 Vaughan,Liwen
T1 Usage Data for Electronic Resources: A Comparison between Locally 
Collected and Vendor-Provided Statistics
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 1
SP 16
OP 22
AB Focuses on a study which investigated the feasibility of using 
locally collected data to check the reliability of vendor-provided 
electronic data. Procedures; Data analysis; Findings.
NO ID: 530

RT Journal
ID 3074
A1 Dworkin,Kristine D.
T1 Library Marketing: Eight Ways to Get Unconventionally Creative
JF Online
YR 2001
VO 25
IS 1
SP 52
OP 54
AB Crative ways for corporate librarians to increase their visibility 
with the employees that could/should be using their services. Advise 
from the Hewlett-Packard Labs Research Library.
NO ID: 303
UL http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1388/1_25/68656982/print.jhtml

RT Journal
ID 3075
A1 Dykeman,Amy
T1 Faculty citations: an approach to assessing the impact of 
diminishing resources on scientific research
JF Library Acquisitions: Practice and Theory
YR 1994
VO 18
IS 2
SP 137
OP 146
AB Faculty references to holdings of the Georgia Institute of 
Technology Library. Scientific and technical literature -- Evaluation. 
Citation analysis. Use studies -- Serial publications. College and 
university libraries -- Relations with faculty and curriculum.
NO ID: 377

RT Journal
ID 3076
A1 Dyson,Esther
T1 Education and jobs in the digital world
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 22 pages.
SP 35
OP 36
K1 Education
K1 Employment
K1 Information technology
K1 Internet
K1 Technological change
K1 Social impact
K1 (5250) Telecommunications systems
K1 (8306) Schools & educational services
K1 (1200) Social policy
K1 (6200) Training & development
AB The digital world will be the infrastructure underlying commerce and 
community in the 21st century. The Net, or the entire modern 
information infrastructure based on digital technology, matters only 
because people use it as a place to communicate, conduct business, and 
share ideas. The digital world will profoundly change how people learn, 
how they work, and what they produce. However, it will not change human 
nature. Although computers and the Net are an important tool for 
education, they cannot replace teachers as role models, mentors, and 
motivators. The worker of the future may well have several jobs, switch 
jobs frequently, and operate more as a freelancer than as a loyal 
member of a team. Education will bear the brunt of training people to 
operate in this new world. People will bear the burden of continuing 
their own educations throughout their own lifetimes. People lacking the 
proper preparation for the digital world will become an increasing 
social problem for themselves and for the rest of society.
NO ID: 119

RT Journal
ID 3077
A1 Edwards,Sherri
T1 Citation analysis as a collection development tool: a bibliometric 
study of polymer science theses and dissertations
JF Serials Review
YR 1999
VO 25
IS 1
SP 11
OP 20
AB Citation analysis. Scientific and technical libraries -- Ohio. 
Collection development. Periodicals University of Akron. Libraries.
NO ID: 414

RT Journal
ID 3078
A1 Eells,Linda L.
T1 For Better or for Worse:The Joys and Woes of E-Journals
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 2004
VO 25
IS 1/2
SP 33
OP 53
AB As electronic journals, or e-journals, have become more prevalent, 
publishers, libraries, and users have all had to adapt to a new 
paradigm, to new methods for publishing, acquiring, providing access 
to, preserving, and searching for research articles. Publishers offer 
new and constantly changing subscription and pricing models, and the 
prices of many commercial journals have been increasing at rates far 
exceeding the rate of inflation. The resulting budget crunch has driven 
significant changes in the way libraries develop their collections as 
they strive to reformulate their traditional role as provider and 
preserver of information. Some libraries are working more in consortium 
with other libraries to purchase large bundled journal packages now 
offered as one of the new subscription models developed by publishers. 
While this appears to be a win-win situation for libraries and users in 
the consortium, potential drawbacks to e-journals and the big bundled 
packages may impact libraries and researchers alike. This study 
investigates some of the potential effects of a move toward e-journal 
only collections, large bundled journal packages, and consortial 
purchasing including archival, economic, content, and research impact 
issues.
NO ID: 561
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v25n01_04&i=1%2F2&s=J122&v=25

RT Book, Section
ID 3080
A1 Eichhorn,Guenther
T1 The Astronomy Digital Library
YR 2004
SP 355
OP 361
AB Astronomy has the most sophisticated on-line information access 
system of all the sciences (Boyce 1998). At its center is the 
Astrophysics Data System (ADS), a bibliographic system that provides 
access to the astronomy literature, as well as a large system of links 
to other on-line resources like electronic journals and data.
NO ID: 697
A2 Wamsteker,Willem
A2 Albrecht,Rudolf
A2 Haubold,Hans J.
T2 Developing Basic Space Science World-Wide: a decade of UN/ESA 
workshops
PB Kluwer Academic Publishers
PP Boston
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1402016816

RT Journal
ID 3702
A1 Ellis,David
A1 Haugan,Merete
T1 Modelling the information seeking patterns of engineers and research 
scientists in an industrial environment
JF Journal of Documentation
YR 1997
VO 53
IS 4
SP 384-403
AB The study explores the role of information and information seeking 
in the Research and Development Department of an international oil and 
gas company. The information seeking patterns of engineers and research 
scientists at Statoil's Research Centre, in Trondheim, Norway were 
studied in relation to their research activities in different phases 
and types of project. The project phases were evaluation of alternative 
solutions; development and testing; and summary of experiences. The 
project types were incremental; radical; and fundamental. Eight major 
characteristics were identified in the patterns: surveying; chaining; 
monitoring; browsing; distinguishing; filtering; extracting and ending. 
The study analyses the requirements for different types of information 
in an environment where the need for internal and external resources 
are intertwined; it also compares features of the information seeking 
patterns of engineers and research scientists from this and previous 
studies, It was found that, although there were differences in the 
features of the information seeking patterns of the research scientists 
and engineers, the behavioural characteristics were similar; and the 
study identified identical or very similar categories of information 
seeking behaviour to those of previous studies of academic researchers.

RT Journal
ID 3081
A1 Ellis,David
A1 Cox,Deborah
A1 Hall,Katherine
T1 A comparison of the information seeking patterns of researchers in 
the physical and social sciences
JF J Doc
YR 1993
FD Dec.
VO 49
IS 4
SP 356
OP 369
K1 Descriptor: Surveys -- Scientific research
AB Analyzes the information-seeking patterns of a group of research 
physicists and chemists and compares them with the information seeking 
activities of a group of social scientists obtained from a previous 
study. The impact of developments in information technology on the 
information or communication patterns of all of the researchers is 
considered. Methods used included: starting, chaining, browsing, 
differentiating, monitoring, extracting, verifying, and ending.
NO BLIB94003406 Provider: OCLC; United Kingdom ISSN: 0022-0418 article 
feature article; ID: 477

RT Journal
ID 3082
A1 Englund,Renee
T1 ACM Portal/ACM Digital Library/ACM Guide
JF Charleston Advisor
YR 2001
VO 3
IS 2
AB Conclusion - With the variety of computing databases on the market 
is there a place for the databases included in the ACM Portal, which 
include the ACM Digital Library and the ACM Guide? For the ACM Digital 
Library I say, “yes,” but for the ACM Guide I say, “it’s too soon to 
tell.” If a customer already subscribes to several ACM publications in 
print, the ACM Digital Library provides an opportunity to increase the 
access to these publications via the Web.
NO ID: 270
UL http://charlestonco.com/review.cfm?id=84

RT Journal
ID 3079
A1 Erdmann,Charlotte A.
T1 Improving the Information-Gathering Skills of Engineering Students
JF Engineering Education
YR 1990
VO 80
IS 4
SP 456
OP 460
AB In engineering education today, information literacy--the ability to 
find and use information efficiently, especially in keeping up-to-date 
on technology--is not considered an important skill for students. Few 
undergraduate engineering courses require students to learn to use the 
multitude of information sources available in libraries. Yet the 
engineering profession should encourage and promote information-
gathering skills because students will need to know how to obtain 
information on current technological developments throughout their 
careers.
NO ID: 879

RT Journal
ID 3083
A1 Esposito,Joseph J.
T1 The devil you don’t know: The unexpected future of Open Access 
publishing
JF First Monday
YR 2004
VO 9
IS 8
AB With the advent of the Internet and online publishing, the notion 
has arisen that access to the world’s research publications could be 
made available to one and all for free, presumably by shifting the 
costs to other places in the value chain and disintermediating 
publishers, a circumstance called Open Access (OA) publishing. While 
there are many hopes embedded in this view (lower costs, wider access, 
etc.), it appears more likely that Open Access will come about not 
through a revolution in the world of legacy publishing, but through 
upstart media built with the innate characteristics of the Internet in 
mind. An unanticipated outcome of this situation will be that the 
overall cost of research publications will rise, though the costs will 
be borne by different players, primarily authors and their proxies.
NO ID: 664
UL http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_8/esposito/

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3084
A1 Etzel,B.
T1 New strategy and techniques to cope with information overload
YR 1995
K1 stress, information technology, cope, coping
AB Information technology and computers create more information 
overload than it helps to solve. People feel overwhelmed rather than 
empowered by new technologies.
NO ID: 95
T2 IEE Colloquium on Information Overload
PB IEE

RT Journal
ID 3086
A1 Ewing,John
T1 Predicting the future of scholarly publishing
JF Mathematical Intelligencer
YR 2003
VO 25
IS 2
SP 3
OP 6
AB When Orville Wright flew his airplane over a small stretch of 
rolling grassland in 1903, the managing editor of Scientific American 
predicted that thousands of planes would soon fly over every city, 
delivering patrons to theaters. On the eve of the First World War, two 
famous British aviators argued that planes would prevent wars in the 
future (because they brought people together). Scientists, engineers, 
and futurists have always conjectured the consequences of technology. 
In the case of planes, the experts were right in recognizing that they 
would profoundly affect our lives in the coming century ... but they 
were certainly wrong in foretelling what that effect would be.
NO ID: 575
UL http://www.ams.org/ewing/Documents/Predicting25.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3085
A1 Ewing,John
T1 Twenty Centuries of Mathematics: Digitizing and Disseminating the 
Past Mathematical Literature
JF Notices of the American Mathematical Society
YR 2002
FD August 2002
VO 49
IS 7
AB Reliance on past literature is common to all disciplines, but time 
scales differ. In some areas of science, literature more than a few 
years old has value mainly for historical reference. For 
mathematicians, work from ten, twenty, or even one hundred years ago is 
relevant and useful in research. Like all scientists, working 
mathematicians will use and reference more recent work the most, but 
having the ability to access the older literature is of essential value 
to research mathematicians.
NO ID: 346
UL http://www.ams.org/notices/200207/fea-ewing.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3087
A1 Ewing,John H.
T1 Open access to journals won't lower prices
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2004
VO 51
IS 6
SP B20
AB Journals publishing is in crisis. For years, subscription prices 
have gone up rapidly, with the average annual increase now close to 10 
percent; some journals cost three times as much today as they did a 
decade ago. The budgets of university libraries have fallen far behind, 
forcing librarians to cancel subscriptions. Publishers have used 
declining subscriptions as a rationale to increase prices even more. 
And the literature has expanded, creating fatter journals (and yet 
another reason for publishers to increase prices). Scholars and 
librarians have become increasingly unhappy about the state of affairs, 
and they demand action.
NO ID: 800
UL http://chronicle.com/free/v51/i06/06b02001.htm

RT Journal
ID 3088
A1 Farber,David J.
T1 Communications technology and its impact by 2010
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 24 pages.
SP 135
OP 138
K1 Communications systems
K1 Electronic commerce
K1 World Wide Web
K1 Innovations
K1 Predictions
K1 (5250) Telecommunications systems
K1 (5400) Research & development
AB Several technologies will come into their own during the next 14 
years. They include satellites in the dress of direct broadcast, mobile 
communications, spurred by the deployment of personal communicators, 
and the potential worldwide usage supported by multimode phones and 
satellites like Iridium. There are several points necessary to make 
when one projects the future technology in communications. Many of the 
devices used to switch and route packets and cells are derived from or 
use commercial processors and chips. Gigabit speeds have raised a whole 
new set of very difficult technical issues. Designing and building 
switching devices and interface devices that can operate at these 
speeds is not simple. It pushes both hardware design and VLSI 
technology to their limits. As a result, it has been necessary to take 
innovative architectural approaches to even hope to achieve speeds 
nearing a gigabit. It is not clear if the Web will become a viable 
commercial mechanism. There is only indirect evidence that certain 
products sell well on the Web.
NO ID: 109

RT Journal
ID 3089
A1 Farnsworth,Paul
T1 There still ain't no such thing as a free lunch
JF Applied Spectroscopy
JO Appl.Spectrosc.
YR 2001
VO 55
IS 4
SP 138A
OP 139A
AB Argues that society presses add significant value to the editing of 
the articles in a nonprofit (not-for-profit) society journal.
NO ID: 783

RT Journal
ID 3090
A1 Feinberg,Renee
T1 B&N: the new college library? (college libraries compete with book 
superstores for patronage)
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 1998
VO 123
IS 2
SP 49
AB Some college students are bypassing their college libraries to use 
the liberal purchase and browsing policies of book superstores such as 
Barnes and Noble or Borders. Colleges must build strong, available, 
accessible, usable and readable book collections to compete.
NO ID: 206

RT Journal
ID 3091
A1 Feitelson,Dror G.
A1 Yovel,Uri
T1 Predictive ranking of computer scientists using CiteSeer data
JF Journal of Documentation
YR 2004
VO 60
IS 1
SP 44
OP 61
AB The increasing availability of digital libraries with cross-citation 
data on the Internet enables new studies in bibliometrics. The paper 
focuses on the list of 10,000 top-cited authors in computer science 
available as part of CiteSeer. Using data from several consecutive 
lists a model of how authors accrue citations with time is constructed. 
By comparing the rate at which individual authors accrue citations with 
the average rate, predictions are made of how their ranking in the list 
will change in the future.
NO ID: 763

RT Journal
ID 3092
A1 Ferguson,Chris
T1 Reshaping academic library reference service : a review of issues
JF Advances in Librarianship
YR 1994
VO 18
SP 73
OP 109
AB Higher education lumbers toward major upheaval, and academic 
libraries evolve toward a new paradigm that has yet to be clearly 
defined. Under these circumstances, it should be no surprise that the 
impact of relentless technological change, fiscal paroxysm, and 
organizational instability have wreaked havoc in the reference service 
community.
NO ID: 65

RT Journal
ID 3093
A1 Fidel,Raya
A1 Green,Maurice
T1 The many faces of accessibility: engineers' perception of 
information sources
JF Information Processing & Management
YR 2004
VO 40
IS 3
SP 563
OP 581
AB Numerous studies of engineers' information seeking behavior have 
found that accessibility was the factor that influenced most their 
selection of information sources. The concept of accessibility, 
however, is ambiguous and was given various interpretations by both 
researchers and engineers. Detailed interviews with 32 engineers, in 
which they described incidents of personal information seeking in 
depth, uncovered some of the specific factors that are part of the 
concept. Engineers selected sources because they had the right format, 
the right level of detail, a lot of information in one place, as well 
as for other reasons. When looking for human information resources, the 
engineers most frequently selected sources with which they were 
familiar, while saving time was the most frequently mentioned reason 
for selecting documentary sources. Future research should continue to 
examine the concept of accessibility through detailed empirical 
investigations.
NO ID: 868
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4573(03)00003-7

RT Journal
ID 3094
A1 Fingerman,Susan
T1 Scopus: profusion and confusion
JF Online
YR 2005
FD March/April
VO 29
IS 2
SP 36
OP 38
AB This article focuses on the Scopus search product developed by 
Elsevier in the U.S. While most end users will probably go ahead and 
plug in their search terms, information professionals will want to stop 
and take a good look at the home page and its offerings. Scopus has 
taken the opposite of the Google approach and included as many options 
as possible right up front. Tabs across the top of the page allow users 
to do fielded searching, searching by source, retrieve alerts, same 
session list of titles, and any personalization. These tabs are 
repeated at the bottom of the screen, a feature if users choose the 
option of showing 200 results per page. Though the Scopus motto is 
finding not searching, there is a lot of searching that can be done. 
Since every search is performed in all three sources, the Scopus 
database, patents, and the Web, search results stress recall rather 
than precision. Basic, advanced and quick searches are available. The 
Basic Search offers many field and limiting options. Field choices 
include the default field of article title, abstract and keywords. 
Boolean searching is allowed, the default is AND, and quotation marks 
can be used for phrase searching. Search terms are highlighted, 
allowing users to see why a record was retrieved.
NO ID: 677

RT Journal
ID 3096
A1 Fishburn,Peter C.
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew M.
T1 Competitive pricing of information goods: Subscription pricing 
versus pay-per-use
JF Economic Theory
YR 1999
VO To Appear
NO ID: 166
UL http://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/competitive.pricing.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3095
A1 Fishburn,Peter
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew M.
A1 Siders,Ryan C.
T1 Fixed fee versus unit pricing for information goods: competition, 
equilibria, and price wars
JF First Monday
YR 1997
VO 2
IS 7 (July)
AB Information goods have negligible marginal costs, and this will 
create possibilities for novel distribution and pricing methods. The 
main concern of this paper is with pricing of goods that are likely to 
be consumed in large quantities by individuals. For example, will 
software continue to be sold at a fixed price for each unit, or will it 
be paid for on the basis of usage? There is substantial evidence both 
from observing marketplace evolution and from surveys that customers 
overwhelmingly prefer subscription pricing. It turns out that even if 
we ignore this factor, per-use pricing is not a clear winner, and 
therefore when the preference effect is taken into account, 
subscription pricing is likely to dominate.
NO ID: 169
UL http://www.firstmonday.dk/issues/issue2_7/odlyzko/index.html

RT Journal
ID 3097
A1 Fisher,William
T1 Now you see it; now you don't: the elusive nature of electronic 
information
JF Library Collections, Acquisitions, & Technical Services
YR 2003
VO 27
IS 4
SP 463
OP 472
AB As more and more information is made available in electronic 
formats, ensuring reliable access to that information over time is 
becoming a concern for acquisitions and collection management personnel 
in all types of libraries. This paper looks at the current situation 
regarding the availability of monographs, serials, government 
publications, and web-based information. Possible resolutions must be 
viewed from a library-wide basis since the situation impacts all of us.
NO ID: 592
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lcats.2003.09.015

RT Journal
ID 3098
A1 Fitzgerald,Carol
T1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Library
JF Colorado Libraries
YR 2001
FD Summer 2001article feature article
VO 27
IS 2
SP 49
OP 50
K1 Descriptor: Scientific and technical libraries -- Colorado.
K1 Named Corp: National Renewable Energy Laboratory
NO ID: 280

RT Journal
ID 3099
A1 Foote,Steven M.
T1 Changes in Library Design: An Architect's Perspective
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2004
VO 4
IS 1
SP 41
OP 59
AB This article discusses and illustrates selected changes and trends 
in the way academic libraries are programmed and designed in response 
to changes in teaching techniques in higher education. The author draws 
particular attention to the new requirements for collaborative study in 
technology-rich spaces and makes detailed recommendations for those 
preparing library space programs.
NO ID: 631
UL 
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v004/4.1f
oote.html

RT Journal
ID 3104
A1 Fosmire,Michael
T1 Scan It and They Will Come....But Will They Cite It?
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 2004
VO 25
IS 1/2
SP 55
OP 72
AB As the number of retrospective digitization projects of journal 
content increases, there is a need to assess the impact of these 
projects on the productivity of researchers. Librarians making 
collection development decisions about acquiring these back files need 
to know how useful they are to researchers. This study provides data on 
usage of a range of years of the Physical Review, and citation 
information from Physical Review Letters to other Physical Review 
articles. The usage of the online archive of Physical Review articles 
indicates that articles are accessed all the way back to the first 
issue, with an average number of downloads on the order of ten per 
article per year. Both usage and citation rates show exponential decay 
rates, however, with different intrinsic time scales. The citation 
half-life is consistent with previous studies of the physics 
literature, while the usage half-life computed here is in conflict with 
older analyses of print usage of the physics literature, although in 
line with some recent online usage studies in medicine. An analysis of 
the citation data indicates a potential order of 10% enhancement in 
citations to articles available in the online archive, but the 
statistical error is of the same magnitude, so no firm conclusions can 
be drawn from that data. A few more years of citation data may be able 
to resolve the question of impact of the online archive on citation 
rates.
NO ID: 563
UL 
https://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ698
9HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&ID=47981

RT Journal
ID 3101
A1 Fosmire,Michael
T1 Bibliographic Instruction in Physics Libraries: A Survey of Current 
Practice and Tips for Marketing BI
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2001
VO 19
IS 2
SP 25
OP 34
AB ABSTRACT. A survey of physics librarians reveals that undergraduate 
physics majors rarely receive formal bibliographic instruction, despite 
a perception that those students are using many kinds of library 
resources. In addition, less than half of the responding institutions 
gave any formal instruction to graduate students. Some institutions 
have been successful in creating library instruction programs in 
physics, however. The kinds of instruction given are described, and 
tips from respondents of how to maximize the chances of obtaining 
instruction opportunities from faculty are shared.
NO ID: 304
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v19n02_03&i=2&s=J122&v=19

RT Journal
ID 3102
A1 Fosmire,Michael
T1 Physics Conference Proceedings and the Electronic Environment -- An 
Investigation of New Dissemination Patterns
JF Collection Management
YR 2001
VO 26
IS 1
SP 25
OP 33
AB Except for high-energy theory conferences, and to a lesser extent 
astrophysics, there is almost no publication of proceedings article on 
the arXiv physics preprint server.
NO ID: 356

RT Journal
ID 3103
A1 Fosmire,Michael
T1 Electronic expectations (book review)
JF J Am Soc Inf Sci Tech
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2001
FD April
VO 52
IS 6
SP 508
OP 509
NO BLIB01007088 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1532-2882 book 
review; ID: 507

RT Journal
ID 3100
A1 Fosmire,Michael
T1 Superconductivity: a selective bibliography
JF Ref Serv Rev
YR 2000
VO 28
IS 2
SP 161
OP 170
K1 Descriptor: Physics literature -- Bibliography
AB The phenomenon of superconductivity has been studied for 90 years, 
with the latest surge in popularity occurring in the late 1980s, when 
high-temperature superconductors were first created. In this time much 
progress has been made to create commercially viable applications of 
the technology and understand the theory behind the phenomenon. 
Furthermore, at a time when national science policy was undergoing 
close scrutiny, the high-temperature superconductor boom served as a 
high-profile case study of the role of government in spurring the 
acceptance of new technologies. This bibliography provides resources 
that chronicle the technological and scientific developments in the 
field since its discovery and the policy decisions and issues that 
governments and society made when faced with a possible scientific 
revolution.
NO BLIB00007948 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0090-7324 article 
bibliography; ID: 505

RT Journal
ID 3105
A1 Fosmire,Michael
A1 Croneis,Karen S.
T1 Looking to the new millennium: strategic planning for SLA units. 
surveying the members of the Physics-Astronomy-Mathematics Division
JF Inf Outlook
YR 1999
FD Nov.
VO 3
IS 11
SP 17, 19
OP 20, 22
K1 Descriptor: Surveys -- Special librarians.
K1 Associations -- Aims and objectives.
K1 Named Corp: Special Libraries Association. Physics-Astronomy-
Mathematics Division
NO BLIB99015359 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1091-0808 article 
feature article; ID: 511

RT Journal
ID 3106
A1 Fosmire,Michael
A1 Macklin,Alexius Smith
T1 Riding the active learning wave: problem-based learning as a 
catalyst for creating faculty-librarian instructional partnerships 
(computer file). Purdue University
YR 2002
K1 Descriptor: Cognition.
K1 Bibliographic instruction -- College and university students.
K1 College and university libraries -- Relations with faculty and 
curriculum.
K1 Named Corp: Purdue University. Libraries
NO BLIB02005937 Provider: OCLC; Issues in Science & Technology 
Librarianship no34 (Spring 2002) Journal Code: Issues Sci Technol Libr 
United States ISSN: 1092-1206 Details: bibl. article feature article; 
ID: 506

RT Journal
ID 3107
A1 Fosmire,Michael
A1 Young,Elizabeth A.
T1 Free scholarly electronic journals: an annotated Webliography 
(computer file)
YR 2000
K1 Descriptor: Web sites -- Directories.
K1 Electronic journals -- Bibliography.
K1 Periodicals, Scientific and technical
NO BLIB00018035 Provider: OCLC; Issues in Science & Technology 
Librarianship no28 (Fall 2000) Journal Code: Issues Sci Technol Libr 
United States ISSN: 1092-1206 article feature article; ID: 508

RT Journal
ID 3108
A1 Fosmire,Michael
A1 Young,Elizabeth A.
T1 Free scholarly electronic journals: what access do college and 
university libraries provide?. survey results
JF Coll Res Libr
YR 2000
FD Nov.
VO 61
IS 6
SP 500
OP 508
K1 Descriptor: Surveys -- Electronic journals.
K1 College and university libraries -- Serial publications
NO BLIB00018039 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0010-0870 Details: 
bibl f tab. article feature article; ID: 509

RT Journal
ID 3109
A1 Fosmire,Michael
A1 Yu,Song
T1 Free scholarly electronic journals: how good are they? (computer 
file)
YR 2000
K1 Descriptor: Electronic journals -- Evaluation.
K1 Periodicals, Scientific and technical
NO BLIB00011394 Provider: OCLC; Issues in Science & Technology 
Librarianship no27 (Summer 2000) Journal Code: Issues Sci Technol Libr 
United States ISSN: 1092-1206 Details: bibl tab. article feature 
article; ID: 510

RT Journal
ID 3110
A1 Foster,Allen
T1 A nonlinear model of information-seeking behavior
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 3
SP 228
OP 237
AB This paper offers a new, nonlinear model of information-seeking 
behavior, which contrasts with earlier stage models of information 
behavior and represents a potential cornerstone for a shift toward a 
new perspective for understanding user information behavior. The model 
is based on the findings of a study on interdisciplinary information-
seeking behavior. The study followed a naturalistic inquiry approach 
using interviews of 45 academics. The interview results were 
inductively analyzed and an alternative framework for understanding 
information-seeking behavior was developed. This model illustrates 
three core processes and three levels of contextual interaction, each 
composed of several individual activities and attributes. These 
interact dynamically through time in a nonlinear manner. The behavioral 
patterns are analogous to an artist's palette, in which activities 
remain available throughout the course of information-seeking. In 
viewing the processes in this way, neither start nor finish points are 
fixed, and each process may be repeated or lead to any other until 
either the query or context determine that information-seeking can end. 
The interactivity and shifts described by the model show information-
seeking to be nonlinear, dynamic, holistic, and flowing. The paper 
offers four main implications of the model as it applies to existing 
theory and models, requirements for future research, and the 
development of information literacy curricula. Central to these 
implications is the creation of a new nonlinear perspective from which 
user information-seeking can be interpreted.
NO ID: 656
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106564229/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3111
A1 Fowler,Kristine K.
T1 Zentralblatt MATH and MathSciNet
JF Charleston Advisor
YR 2000
VO 1
IS 3
NO ID: 256
UL 
http://www.charlestonco.com/comp.cfm?id=5&CFID=745767&CFTOKEN=3151968

RT Journal
ID 3112
A1 Fox,Edward A.
A1 Marchionini,Gary
T1 Toward a worldwide digital library
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1998
VO 41
IS 4
SP 29
OP 32
AB DIGITAL LIBRARIES CAN BE AMONG THE MOST COMPLEX AND advanced forms 
of information systems because they often involve collaboration 
support, digital document preservation, distributed database 
management, hypertext, information filtering, information retrieval, 
instructional modules, intellectual property rights management, 
multimedia information services, question answering and reference 
services, resource discovery, and selective dissemination of 
information. While physical libraries develop digital components and 
other business and cultural organizations offer their materials over 
networks, thousands of digital libraries are emerging around the world, 
crossing all disciplines and media and ranging from the small, such as 
community organizations offering online catalogs and news for local 
constituencies, to the large, such as national libraries offering a 
wide variety of research and cultural treasures in multiple media.
NO ID: 765
UL http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/273035.273043

RT Journal
ID 3113
A1 Frank,Donald G.
T1 Education for Librarians in a Major Science-Engineering Library: 
Expectations and Reality
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1989
VO 11
IS 3-4
SP 107
OP 116
AB In the recruitment and selection of professional librarians, what 
are the important attitudes, characteristics, and skills needed to 
perform effectively in the science-engineering library? In this paper, 
the author discusses relevant criteria and personal expectations 
perceived as critical to professional success in a large science-
engineering library.
NO ID: 343

RT Journal
ID 3114
A1 Franklin,Hugh I.
T1 Sci tech book approval plans can be effective
JF Collection Management
YR 1994
VO 19
IS 1/2
SP 135
OP 145
AB Engineering and physical science books treated collectively by three 
named vendors are compared. For sci tech book approval plans to work 
well, it is recommended that a uniform set of plans for 
interdisciplinary subjects be used. Forms alone may be a useful 
alternative.
NO ID: 66

RT Book, Whole
ID 3115
A1 Fredriksson,Einar H.
T1 A century of science publishing: a collection of essays
YR 2001
AB Ch. 1 Birth of Scientific Publishing - Descartes in the Netherlands 
/ Jean Galard 3 Ch. 2 Academic Publications before 1940 / Alan Cook 15 
Ch. 3 Growth and Decline of German Scientific Publishing 1850-1945 / 
Heinz Sarkowski 25 Ch. 4 Ohmsha, its Birth and History / Seiji Sato 35 
Ch. 5 Science Press (Longman's Book Co., Ltd.) / Wang Jixiang 49 Ch. 6 
Dutch Publishing Scene: Elsevier and North-Holland / Einar H. 
Fredriksson 61 Ch. 7 Robert Maxwell: Forty-Four Years as Publisher / 
Robert N. Miranda 77 Ch. 8 Learned Societies Adapt to New Publishing 
Realities - A Review of the Role Played by U.S. Societies / Robert H. 
Marks 91 Ch. 9 German Post-WWII Developments and Changes in the 
Language of Science / Ekkehard Hundt 97 Ch. 10 Akademie-Verlag Berlin, 
Academy Publishing Tradition in East Europe / Hans Kruschwitz 109 Ch. 
11 Scientists as Publishers: The Company of Biologists Ltd / Richard 
Skaer 117 Ch. 12 Science Textbook Publishing in the U.S. / Yale Altman 
127 Ch. 13 Publishing Science and Technology Books in India / Mohan 
Primlani, Raj Mirchandani 133 Ch. 14 Move of U.S. Publishers Overseas / 
Peter Brown 139 Tools and Trends Ch. 15 Institute for Scientific 
Information / Tony Cawkell, Eugene Garfield 149 Ch. 16 Medical 
Databases: Medline versus Excerpta Medica / Robert R. Blanken, Pierre 
J. Vinken 161 Ch. 17 Impact of Computers and Communications on 
Publishing / Nico Poppelier, Einar H. Fredriksson 177 Ch. 18 
Developments in Technical Typesetting; TeX at the End of the 20th 
Century / Barbara Beeton 191 Ch. 19 Biological and Medical Publishing 
via the Internet / Matthew Cockerill 203 Ch. 20 Changes in 
Librarianship / Bjorn Tell 217 Ch. 21 Peer Review: The Holy Cow of 
Science / Jaap de Vries 231 Ch. 22 Watersheds in Scientific Journal 
Publishing / Jamie Cameron 245 Ch. 23 View from the Middle: 
Subscription Agents, Intermediaries and the ASA / John Merriman, Rollo 
Turner 257 Ch. 24 Developments in Scientific Communication - The 
Virtual Marketplace as a Prerequisite for Growth / Hans E. Roosendaal, 
Peter A. Th. M. Geurts, Paul E. van der Vet 269 Ch. 25 Open Reviewing, 
Closed Refereeing: Where's the Publication? / Erik Sandewall 285
NO ID: 731
PB IOS Press
PP Washington, DC
SN 4274904245
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i4274904245

RT Journal
ID 3116
A1 Frické,Martin
A1 Fallis,Don
T1 Indicators of accuracy for answers to ready reference questions on 
the Internet
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 3
SP 238
OP 245
AB The Internet is increasingly being used as a source of reference 
information. Internet users need to be able to distinguish accurate 
information from inaccurate information. Toward this end, information 
professionals have published checklists for evaluating information. 
However, such checklists can be effective only if the proposed 
indicators of accuracy really do indicate accuracy. This study 
implements a technique for testing such indicators of accuracy and uses 
it to test indicators of accuracy for answers to ready reference 
questions. Many of the commonly proposed indicators of accuracy (e.g., 
that the Web site does not contain advertising) were not found to be 
correlated with accuracy. However, the link structure of the Internet 
can be used to identify Web sites that are more likely to contain 
accurate reference information.
NO ID: 655
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106566444/ABSTRACT

RT Report
ID 3117
A1 Friedlander,Amy
T1 Dimensions and Use of the Scholarly Information Environment: 
Introduction to a Data Set Assembled by the Digital Library Federation 
and Outsell, Inc
YR 2002
FD November 7
AB We know from anecdotal evidence that users' expectations of 
libraries are changing as they find more information directly from the 
Web. Anecdotal evidence, though, is hardly enough for developing 
persuasive plans for new library services. The Digital Library 
Federation (DLF) and Council on Library and Information Resources 
(CLIR) commissioned Outsell, Inc., to conduct a large-scale study of 
undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty members from academic 
institutions ranging from the small liberal arts college to the largest 
research university. Our hope was that a picture of user behavior would 
emerge. This report presents a summary of the findings and 158 selected 
data tables; it should be viewed as an entry to a much larger data set. 
The full set of 659 data tables provided by Outsell will be mounted on 
CLIR's or DLF's Web site. We encourage readers to make use of these 
tables and ask that you share with us your analyses of the data. In 
addition, CLIR will deposit the raw data tapes with the Inter-
University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR).
NO ID: 485
PP Washington, D.C.
T3 Tertiary Dimensions and Use of the Scholarly Information 
Environment: Introduction to a Data Set Assembled by the Digital 
Library Federation and Outsell, Inc.
UL http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub110/contents.html

RT Journal
ID 3118
A1 Frohlich,Cliff
A1 Resler,Lynn
T1 Analysis of Publications and Citations from a Geophysics Research 
Institute
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2001
FD Jul
VO 52
IS 9
SP 701
OP 713
K1 Bibliometrics
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Citations (References)
K1 Publications
K1 Geophysics
K1 Research Methodology
K1 Researchers
K1 Scientific Methodology
K1 Scientists
K1 Statistical Analysis
AB Performs an analysis of all 1128 publications produced by scientists 
during their employment at the University of Texas Institute for 
Geophysics, thus assessing research performance using as bibliometric 
indicators such statistics as publications per year, citations per 
paper, and cited half-lives. Evaluates five different methods for 
determining the cited half-life and discusses the robustness and 
limitations of the methods. (Contains 50 references.) (AEF)
NO EJ629877; 3318-3324(200107)52:92.0.TX;2-Q English 3318-3324 Jul 2001 
701 200107 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR544200 CIJJAN2002 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 398

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3119
A1 Fry,Jenny
A1 Talja,Sanna
T1 The cultural shaping of scholarly communication: Explaining e-
journal use within and across academic fields
YR 2004
AB Current research on e-journal usage patterns focuses more on 
measuring levels of use and measuring changes in reading patterns than 
developing theoretical models that enable the explanation and 
prediction of patterns in the adoption and uptake of e-journals across 
scientific fields. Typically, studies either focus on single 
disciplines or attempt to reach an overview of disciplinary differences 
by using broad disciplinary groupings, such as physical sciences, 
health sciences, applied technologies, social sciences, or humanities. 
We argue that there is a need for extending the domain analytic 
approach to incorporate a fuller understanding of the cultural 
characteristics of scientific specialisms, which include both 
epistemological and social considerations. To this end we suggest that 
Whitley's theory of the social organization of scholarly fields can be 
effectively used as an explanatory model of e-journal use across 
scientific fields. By using Whitley's theory we also illustrate the 
limitation of current approaches to the explanation of information 
practices and e-journal use that use the administrative unit of the 
discipline, or base comparison on coarse-grained aggregations as the 
unit of analysis, rather than the specialism.
NO ID: 641
T2 Proceedings of the 67th ASIS&T Annual Meeting, vol. 41
UL http://www.uta.fi/~lisaka/FryTalja_asistfinal_konv.pdf

RT Book, Section
ID 3120
A1 Fuseler-McDowell,Elizabeth
T1 Collection evaluation and development using citation analysis 
techniques
YR 1989
SP 99
OP 108
AB A description of the various ways in which citation analysis can be 
used in collection evaluation and development, including a historical 
overview and current methods. The paper includes methods with can be 
used by individual libraries to determine the list of "core journals" 
specific to the individual library.
NO ID: 418
A2 Burkhart,R. W.
T2 IAMSLIC at a crossroads - International Association of Marine 
Science Libraries and Information Centers. Conference (15th :1989 :St 
George's, Bermuda).
PB International Association of Marine Science Libraries and 
Information Centers

RT Journal
ID 3121
A1 Fyffe,Richard C.
A1 Shulenburger,David E.
T1 Economics as if science mattered: the BioOne business model and the 
transformation of scholarly publishing
JF Library Collections, Acquisitions, & Technical Services
YR 2002
VO 26
IS 3
SP 231
OP 239
AB The BioOne database of scholarly journals in the biological and 
ecological sciences was established in the belief that broad and 
enduring access to scholarly literature is essential not just to the 
health of the scientific enterprise but also to the health of the wider 
society in which science is practiced. The prevailing model of profit-
based journal publishing – in which high prices are impeding access – 
is harming the interests of the very scientists who provide its life-
blood. The BioOne business model seeks to meet the interlocking goals 
of providing broad and enduring access, supporting the publishing 
enterprise of scholarly societies, and assuring that BioOne will keep 
pace with changes in technology and scientific communication. 
[Copyright 2002 Elsevier]
NO ID: 539

RT Journal
ID 3122
A1 Gaines,Brian R.
A1 Chen,Lee Li-Jen
A1 Shaw,Mildred L. G.
T1 Modeling the human factors of scholarly communities supported 
through the Internet and World Wide Web
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1997
VO 48
IS 11
SP 987
OP 1003
K1 human factors, world wide web, net, internet, web, www, human-
computer interaction, browser, browsers
NO ID: 149

RT Journal
ID 3123
A1 Gannon,Frank
T1 Ethical Profits from Publishing
JF EMBO reports
JO EMBO Rep.
YR 2004
VO 5
IS 1
SP 1
AB The past decades have seen an enormous growth in the number of 
scientific journals. Many of these have been founded by scientific 
societies that believe that the interests of their community are best 
served by having a journal focused on their area of research. Society 
members, volunteering to act as editors and reviewers, set the 
standards for quality and thus ensure that the journal reflects the 
ambitions of the society. However, these volunteered services do not 
convert accepted manuscripts into printed journals, and so many 
societies rely on a commercial publishing house to take care of the 
printing and distribution. There seemed to be no further consequences—
after all, they were not 'for profit'. These societies relied on the 
professionalism of the publishers to get the sums right and market the 
journal gently. Sometimes, perhaps to their surprise, the journal not 
only satisfied the need to publish scientific works but also generated 
money for the societies' activities.
NO ID: 634
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/embor/journal/v5/n1/full/7400057.html

RT Newspaper Article
ID 3124
A1 Garrison,Jessica
T1 The stereotype of librarians as spinsters with 'Quiet!' on their 
lips and the Dewey Decimal System in their hearts is out. Better pay, 
new information systems and the Internet have changed everything
JF Los Angeles Times
YR 1999
FD November 28
SP 2
AB Kren Malone is young, hip and out to change the world. From her desk 
at the public library. "I saw ignorance at its worst," the 24-year-old 
Los Angeles city librarian said about growing up in the poorer 
neighborhoods of Compton. "Being in public librarianship allows me to 
do something about that. Like generations of librarians before her, 
Malone is firmly entrenched as part of the literacy establishment, 
standing shoulder to shoulder with parents and classroom teachers in 
the ongoing campaign to teach reading and the love of literature. But 
unlike her predecessors, she comes to the challenge with high-tech 
tools, an evolving mission and a dynamic attitude that finally puts to 
rest the stereotype of librarians as cranky old ladies with glasses, 
orthopedic shoes and a neurotic fixation on silence.
NO ID: 815
T2 Los Angeles Times
PP Los Angeles
UL http://www.schoolibrary.org/leg/pr/stacks.htm

RT Journal
ID 3125
A1 Garson,Lorrin R.
T1 Communicating original research in chemistry and related sciences
JF Accounts of Chemical Research
JO Acc.Chem.Res.
YR 2004
VO 37
IS 3
SP 141
OP 148
AB The availability of scientific information in electronic form is the 
convergence of traditional journal publishing, electronic 
communications, and the widespread availability of computer technology. 
This revolution in scientific communication has its roots in 
developments that started in the mid-19th century and culminated with 
the extraordinary progress in telecommunications and computer 
technology in the latter years of the 20th century. Eighty-three 
percent of scientific journals are now available online. The benefits 
of electronic journals include rapid publication, instantaneous linking 
to external information sources, and the capability to deliver new 
types of information. To date neither electronic-only nor preprint 
servers have been well received by the chemical sciences community. 
Continued advances in telecommunications, computer technology, and 
acquisition of scientific data in structured formats hold promise for 
even greater advances in communication of scientific information.
NO ID: 647
UL http://pubs3.acs.org/acs/journals/doilookup?in_doi=10.1021/ar0300017

RT Journal
ID 3126
A1 Garvey,William D.
A1 Griffith,Belver C.
T1 Communication and Information Processing within Scientific 
Disciplines: Empirical Findings for Psychology
JF Information Storage and Retrieval
YR 1972
VO 8
IS 3
SP 123
OP 136
NO ID: 338

RT Journal
ID 3127
A1 Garvey,William D.
A1 Lin,Nan
A1 Nelson,Carnot E.
A1 Tomita,Kazuo
T1 Research Studies in Patterns of Scientific COmmunication: I. General 
Description of Research Program
JF Information Storage and Retrieval
YR 1972
VO 8
IS 3
SP 111
OP 122
NO ID: 339

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3128
A1 Gazzale,Robert S.
A1 Mackie-Mason,Jeffrey K.
T1 System design, user cost and electronic usage of journals
YR 2000
FD March 23, 2000
AB Dramatic increases in the capabilities and decreases in the costs of 
computers and communi-cation networks have fomented revolutionary 
thoughts in the scholarly publishing community. In one dimension, 
traditional pricing schemes and product packages are being modified or 
re-placed. We designed and undertook a large-scale field experiment in 
pricing and bundling for electronic access to scholarly journals: PEAK. 
We provided Internet-based delivery of content from 1200 Elsevier 
Science journals to users at multiple campuses and commercial 
facilities. Our primary research objective was to generate rich 
empirical evidence on user behavior when faced with various bundling 
schemes and price structures. In this article we explain the different 
types and levels of cost that users faced when accessing individual 
articles, and report on the ef-fect of these costs on usage. We found 
that both monetary and non-monetary user costs have a significant 
impact on the demand for electronic access. We also estimate how taking 
user costs into account would change the "optimal" (least cost) bundle 
of access options that an institution should purchase.
NO ID: 203
T2 Economics and Usage of Digital Library Collections - Conference
PP Ann Arbor, MI
UL http://www.si.umich.edu/PEAK-2000/gazzale.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3129
A1 Gessesse,kebede
T1 Scientific communication, electronic access and document delivery : 
the new challenge to the science - engineering reference librarian
JF International Information and Library Review
YR 1994
VO 26
IS December
AB Scientific and technical communication is one means of sharing 
knowledge in the form of ideas, research finings, and or observations 
among scientists and engineers. the literature dealing with information 
seeking behavior by the pure scientists and engineers is reviewed. 
Information technology is advancing at a rapid rate that engineers and 
pure scientists ought to know how to locate and use the right kind of 
literature pertinent to their respective field. In this respect, the 
role to be played by the science reference librarians is very critical.
NO ID: 67

RT Journal
ID 3130
A1 Giles,Jim
T1 Elsevier waves goodbye to BioMedNet web portal
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2003
VO 426
IS 6968
SP 744
AB The popular life-sciences website BioMedNet is to close down for 
good. Observers say that the decision by scientific publisher Elsevier, 
which owns it, heralds a move away from general scientific websites, 
towards more specialized services. Elsevier bought BioMedNet in 1997 
from Vitek Tracz, an online-publishing pioneer who developed it for the 
London-based Current Science Group, which he chairs. BioMedNet evolved 
to bring together several Elsevier publications, such as the Trends 
series of journals, with conference reports, information on lab 
equipment, and access to the Medline database of life-sciences papers.
NO ID: 772
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v426/n6968/full/426744b_fs.html

RT Journal
ID 3131
A1 Gilman,Todd
T1 Suspicious Minds
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2005
FD March 3
AB After I wrote several columns offering practical advice to Ph.D.'s 
who might want to consider a career in academic librarianship, I began 
to hear from some of my fellow librarians who were less than thrilled 
with my encouragement. Careers in academic libraries, these critics 
said, should not be considered a haven for Ph.D. refugees who "failed" 
on the faculty job market. Some librarians -- in comments made directly 
to me and to one another on various blogs -- said the profession should 
reward those for whom librarianship was a first-choice career, not 
something resorted to in desperation. Let me state up front: I am an 
English Ph.D. and an academic librarian. So I suppose it's no surprise 
that the criticisms I've heard about Ph.D. applicants strike me as 
fallacious, based as they are on an either-or reasoning: Either 
librarianship was your first choice or you didn't really choose it at 
all, you just fell into it against your will, and hence don't deserve 
its rewards. If you are a Ph.D. applying for a position in an academic 
library, you need to be prepared for the resistance you might encounter 
from some of your would-be colleagues. I'd like to offer a few 
suggestions on how to nip such negative perceptions in the bud.
NO ID: 628
UL http://chronicle.com/jobs/2005/03/2005030301c.htm

RT Journal
ID 3132
A1 Gomez,Marin J.
T1 Marketing Models for Libraries: a Survey of Effective Muses from Far 
Afield
JF Library Administration and Management
YR 2001
VO 15
IS 3
SP 169
OP 171
AB The author recommends that libraries use the marketing experiences 
of other cultural institutions, specifically the museum, cultural and 
performing arts communities.
NO ID: 305

RT Journal
ID 3133
A1 Gooden,Angela M.
T1 Citation analysis of chemistry doctoral dissertations: an Ohio State 
University case study
JF Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship
YR 2001
FD Fall
IS 32
AB A citation analysis of dissertations accepted in the Department of 
Chemistry at The Ohio State University between 1996-2000 was performed 
as a way to determine material use. The 30 dissertations studied 
generated a total of 3,704 citations. Types of materials cited, 
currency of literature, and dissertation topics were all analyzed. The 
current results corroborate past research by other authors. Journal 
articles were cited more frequently than monographs: 85.8% of the 
citations were journal articles and 8.4% of the citations were 
monographs. The results of this study may be used to assist OSU and 
other universities in chemistry collection development.
NO ID: 410
UL http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/01-fall/refereed.html

RT Journal
ID 3134
A1 Goodrum,Abby A.
A1 McCain,Katherine W.
A1 Lawrence,Steve
A1 Giles,C. Lee
T1 Scholarly publishing in the Internet age: a citation analysis of 
computer science literature
JF Information Processing & Management
YR 2001
VO 37
IS 5
SP 661
OP 675
AB The Web is revolutionizing the entire scholarly communication 
process and changing the way that researchers exchange information. In 
this paper, we analyze two views of information production and use in 
computer-related research based on citation analysis of PDF and 
Postcript formatted publications on the Web using autonomous citation 
indexing (ACI), and a parallel citation analysis of the journal 
literature indexed by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) in 
SCISEARCH. Our goal is to establish a baseline profile of computer 
science 'literature' as it appears in the published journals and as it 
appears on the publicly available Web. From this starting point, we 
hope to identify additional research areas dealing with information 
dissemination and citation practices in computer science and the 
utility of autonomous citation indexing on the Web as an adjunct to 
commercial indexing.
NO ID: 554
UL http://0-dx.doi.org.bianca.penlib.du.edu/10.1016/S0306-
4573(00)00047-9

RT Journal
ID 3135
A1 Gordon,Rachel SInger
A1 Nesbeitt,Sarah
T1 Who are we, where we're going: a report from the front
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 1999
VO 124
IS 9
SP 36
OP 39
AB A recent survey of career librarians sought to discover current 
attitudes about job satisfaction, the current and future state of the 
profession, and other matters. Many librarians expressed frustration 
with low salaries, lack of respect, and the emphasis on technology. 
Many also cited their love of reading and books as what drew them to 
the profession. Enjoyment of research and the desire to work with 
people were other attractors. Most respondents saw a gap between the 
validity of librarianship and the public perception of that validity.
NO ID: 228

RT Journal
ID 3136
A1 Gorman,Michael
T1 Collection development in interesting times: a summary
JF Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services
YR 2003
VO 27
IS 4
SP 459
OP 462
AB This paper was largely derived from my contribution to the Against 
the Grain volume Scholarly publishing [1]. Therefore, what follows is a 
summary and not the full paper. The paper began by addressing the 
question of what constitutes a library collection in the modern world. 
The definition of a library collection has expanded over the last 125 
years to comprise at least four levels, 1. locally owned physical 
documents. 2. physical documents owned by other libraries but available 
through ILL. 3. purchased or subscribed to electronic documents. 4. 
"free" electronic documents.
NO ID: 591
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lcats.2003.09.010

RT Report
ID 3137
A1 Gottbrath,Chris
A1 Bailin,Jeremy
A1 Meakin,Casey
A1 Thompson,Todd
A1 Charfman,J. J.
T1 The Effects of Moore's Law and Slacking on Large Computations
YR 1999
FD December 9, 1999
SP 1
OP 5
AB We show that, in the context of Moore's Law, overall productivity 
can be increased for large enough computations by `slacking' or waiting 
for some period of time before purchasing a computer and beginning the 
calculation.
NO ID: 204
T3 Tertiary The Effects of Moore's Law and Slacking on Large 
Computations
UL http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/astro-ph/9912202

RT Report
ID 3138
A1 Grabmeier,Jeff
T1 Texts on Computer Screens Harder to Understand, Less Persuasive
YR 2000
FD August 5, 2000
AB Students who read essays on a computer screen found the text harder 
to understand, less interesting and less persuasive than students who 
read the same essay on paper, a new study has found. Researchers had 
131 undergraduate students read two articles that had appeared in Time 
magazine - some read from the magazine, some read the exact same text 
after it had been scanned into a computer. "We were surprised that 
students found paper texts easier to understand and somewhat more 
convincing," said P. Karen Murphy, co-author of the study and assistant 
professor of educational psychology at Ohio State University. "It may 
be that students need to learn different processing abilities when they 
are attempting to read computerized text."
NO ID: 360
PP Columbus, OH
T3 Tertiary Texts on Computer Screens Harder to Understand, Less 
Persuasive
UL http://www.acs.ohio-state.edu/units/research/archive/comptext.htm

RT Journal
ID 3139
A1 Graham,Leah
A1 Metaxas,Panagiotis Takis
T1 'Of course it's true; I saw it on the Internet!'
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 2003
VO 46
IS 5
SP 71
OP 75
AB Relates the results of a survey on how college students react to 
information on the Internet. Reliance of students on the Internet for 
information; Claims students are more likely to believe; Susceptibility 
to misleading claims; Extraordinary confidence students have in search 
engines.
NO ID: 516

RT Journal
ID 3140
A1 Gray,Edward
A1 Langley,Anne
T1 Public Services and Electronic Resources: Perspectives from the 
Science and Engineering Libraries at Duke University
JF Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship
YR 2002
IS 35
AB The rapid and recent transfer of library materials to electronic 
formats has changed how we do public service in our science and 
engineering libraries. We reflected on how this has specifically 
changed the experience for the user; and what sorts of new skills 
public service librarians need to have to best serve user needs. 
Finally, we share some ideas on what the future may be like.
NO ID: 351
UL http://www.istl.org/02-summer/article2.html

RT Journal
ID 3141
A1 Greene,Robert J.
T1 Computer Analysis of Local Citation Information in Collection 
Management
JF Collection Management
YR 1993
VO 17
IS 4
SP 11
OP 24
K1 physics, Emory University, science citation index
NO ID: 363

RT Book, Section
ID 3142
A1 Griffiths,Jose-Marie
A1 Carroll,Bonnie C.
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Sheetz,Christine M.
T1 Dissemination of Scientific and Technical Information Dissemination 
in the United States: Report of an NSF Study
YR 1991
SP 386
OP 387
AB Gives basic statistics, dollars, and growth of scientific 
information.
NO ID: 455
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (54th :1991 
:Washington, D.C.). ASIS '91 Learned Information

RT Journal
ID 3143
A1 Grimes,Deborah J.
A1 Boening,Carl H.
T1 Worries with the Web: A Look at Student Use of Web Resources
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2001
VO 62
IS 1
SP 11
OP 23
NO ID: 489

RT Journal
ID 3144
A1 Grimwade,Alexander, M.
T1 Why science journals are so expensive
JF The Scientist
YR 1999
VO 13
IS 3 (February 1)
K1 Elsevier, Reed,
AB In 1974, the editorial board of Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, at 
the time and still the world's largest journal of biochemistry, 
gathered in Amsterdam to celebrate the journal's 25th anniversary at a 
lavish party hosted by Elsevier-North Holland Biomedical Press. 
Attending the gathering were such legendary figures in biochemistry as 
Sir Hans Krebs, Nobel Prize-winning discoverer of the tricarboxylic 
acid cycle, Fyodor Lynen, Nobel Prize-winning discoverer of fatty acid 
synthetase, Alex Bangham, "inventor" of the liposome, and many others. 
At that party, E.C. (Bill) Slater, the managing editor of BBA and 
professor of biochemistry at the University of Amsterdam, gave a speech 
in which he wittily projected the exponential growth of the journal for 
the next 25 years, by which time, he estimated, it would be publishing 
one volume every five minutes, have a subscription price of several 
millions of dollars, and a staff exceeding 500. While the growth of the 
journal has fallen short of his lighthearted projections, it often 
appears to librarians that the parent company, now Reed-Elsevier, has 
fulfilled his prophecy on subscription prices.
NO ID: 157
UL http://www.the-
scientist.library.upenn.edu/yr1999/feb/comm_990201.html

RT Journal
ID 3145
A1 Grothkopf,Uta
T1 Bits and Bytes and Still a Lot of Paper: Astronomy Libraries and 
Librarians in the Age of Electronic Publishing
JF Astrophysics and Space Science
YR 1997
VO 247
IS 1-20004-640x
SP 155
OP 174
AB The future has already begun. The information superhighway, 
hypermedia, digital libraries and electronic publishing are not vague 
concepts anymore that might be awaiting us beyond the year 2000. 
Instead, they are already here. Each day our electronic mailbox is 
flooded with announcements about new sites on the World Wide Web that 
vie for our attention. More and more information resources are easily 
accessible and need to be checked out. Modern communication technology 
has brought us so close together that all the information available 
anywhere on this planet seems to be at our fingertips.
NO ID: 138
UL http://www.eso.org/gen-fac/libraries/bits-and-bytes/bits-and-
bytes.html

RT Journal
ID 3146
A1 Guernsey,Lisa
T1 Publisher offers personal web pages for scholars using its on-line 
journals
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 1997
FD October 10
AB With more academic journals popping up on the World-Wide Web every 
month, some scholars are beginning to use the Internet as if it were a 
photocopier or reading room. But the Wiley & Sons publishing house, 
which opened its on-line service today, wants professors to see it also 
as their personal workspace. For the next three months, anyone on the 
Web can test that approach by tapping into the 50 journals that are 
available so far on Wiley InterScience. From that page, company 
officials invite users to try out what they tout as an innovation in 
scholarly publishing: "Personal Home Pages."
NO ID: 780
UL http://chronicle.com/prm/che-
data/internet.dir/itdata/1997/10/t97100101.htm

RT Journal
ID 3147
A1 Gunturnkun,Onur
T1 Adult persistence of head-turning asymmetry: A neonatal right-side 
preference makes a surprising romantic reappearance later in life
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2003
FD February 13
VO 421
IS 6924
SP 711
AB A preference in humans for turning the head to the right, rather 
than to the left, during the final weeks of gestation and for the first 
six months after birth constitutes one of the earliest examples of 
behavioural asymmetry and is thought to influence the subsequent 
development of perceptual and motor preferences by increasing visual 
orientation to the right side. Here I show that twice as many adults 
turn their heads to the right as to the left when kissing, indicating 
that this head-motor bias persists into adulthood. My finding may be 
linked to other forms of sidedness (for example, favouring the right 
foot, ear or eye) that do not become established until long after the 
newborn head-turning preference has disappeared.
NO ID: 698
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v421/n6924/full/421711a_fs.html

RT Journal
ID 3148
A1 Gupta,Usha
T1 Obsolescence of physics literature: exponential decrease of the 
density of citations to Physical review articles with age
JF J Am Soc Inf Sci
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.
YR 1990
FD June '90
VO 41
SP 282
OP 287
K1 Descriptor: Periodicals -- Evaluation.
K1 Periodicals, Physics.
K1 Citation analysis.
K1 Obsolescence of books, periodicals, etc.
K1 Title Subject: Physical review
AB A synchronous citation study of 15 leading physics journals has been 
performed to determine the obsolescence of Physical Review articles 
with age. The density of citations to Physical Review has been found to 
decrease exponentially with a half-life of 4.9 years, which is the 
first conclusive evidence of the exponential decrease. © 1990 John 
Wiley & Sons, Inc.
NO BLIB90012032 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0002-8231 Details: 
bibl charts. article feature article; ID: 494

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3149
A1 Guthrie,Kevin
T1 Revitalizing Older Published Literature: Preliminary Lessons from 
the Use of JSTOR
YR 2000
FD March 24, 2000
AB JSTOR, a not-for-profit organization focused initially on creating a 
trusted archive of the backfiles of important scholarly journal 
literature, has recently completed the first phase of its work. The 
JSTOR Phase I database now includes the backfiles of 117 journal titles 
from 15 academic disciplines, a collection numbering nearly 5,000,000 
pages. More than 600 academic institutions from 25 countries now have 
access to JSTOR, with approximately 200 having had access since early 
1997. With its emphasis on journal backfiles, and several years of 
usage data now available, JSTOR presents an interesting opportunity to 
study the impact of electronic technologies on the usage of this 
literature. It is generally accepted that usage of this older 
literature in its original paper form was, at best, quite modest. In 
this paper, to the extent that the author can find reliable data about 
usage in the paper format, he will compare these data with the usage of 
the material in electronic form. In addition, the author plans to track 
same-institution usage at a sample set of JSTOR institutions that have 
had access to the database since the beginning. In addition to tracing 
the growth in that usage over time, the author will analyze usage 
patterns (variations in usage by year, by discipline, by institutional 
type, etc.) in order to draw out lessons of general relevance to the 
scholarly community. This paper will provide one perspective on how 
electronic access to material impacts its "value".
NO ID: 201
T2 Economics and Usage of Digital Library Collections - Conference
PP Ann Arbor, MI
UL http://www.si.umich.edu/PEAK-2000/guthrie.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3150
A1 Gyeszly,Suzanne D.
A1 Bustion,Marifran
A1 Treadwell,Jane
T1 Infrequently Used Serials: A Space Utilization Project
JF Collection Management
YR 1990
VO 12
IS 1/2
SP 109
OP 124
AB The authors from the Sterling C. Evans Library at Texas A&M describe 
the criteria for selecting infrequently used serials and the physical 
move of over 53,000 volumes to a storage area within the library 
facility.
NO ID: 706

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3151
A1 Haar,John
T1 Project PEAK: Vanderbilt's Experience with Articles on Demand
YR 1999
FD June, 1999
AB To understand why the PEAK concept intrigued Vanderbilt, it is 
instructive to review how academic libraries currently acquire and 
supply their patrons with journal literature. First, we select the 
journals. As a collection development officer, I define selection as 
the rational act of carefully choosing those titles most likely to 
offer reliable scholarly and clinical information in subjects that 
closely match local interests. Sound selection decisions are informed 
by a knowledge of both subject literatures and the research and 
instructional programs on our campuses. Put another way, serials 
selection is an attempt to anticipate--one could say guess--which of 
the thousands of periodicals published for the academic market that 
faculty and students will actually want to read.
NO ID: 188
T2 NASIG Conference
UL http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/peak/Haar-Nasig.htm

RT Journal
ID 3152
A1 Haar,John
T1 Project PEAK: Vanderbilt's Experience with Articles on Demand
JF Serials Librarian
YR 1999
VO 38
IS 1/2
SP 91
OP 99
AB To understand why the PEAK concept intrigued Vanderbilt, it is 
instructive to review how academic libraries currently acquire and 
supply their patrons with journal literature. First, we select the 
journals. As a collection development officer, I define selection as 
the rational act of carefully choosing those titles most likely to 
offer reliable scholarly and clinical information in subjects that 
closely match local interests. Sound selection decisions are informed 
by a knowledge of both subject literatures and the research and 
instructional programs on our campuses. Put another way, serials 
selection is an attempt to anticipate--one could say guess--which of 
the thousands of periodicals published for the academic market that 
faculty and students will actually want to read.
NO ID: 818
UL https://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ6989HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&a=3&s=J123&v=3
8&i=1%2F2&fn=J123v38n01%5F10

RT Journal
ID 3153
A1 Haas,Stephanie Cornell
A1 Lee,Catherine W.
T1 Research journal usage by the forestry faculty at the University of 
Florida, Gainesville
JF Collection Building
YR 1991
VO 11
IS 2
SP 23
OP 25
AB Use studies, Serial publications. Citation analysis. Periodicals, 
Forestry. College and university libraries
NO ID: 372

RT Journal
ID 3154
A1 Hackenberg,Jill
T1 Who chooses sci-tech librarianship?
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2000
VO 61
IS 5
SP 441
OP 450
K1 Surveys -- Science librarians.
K1 Librarians -- Careers
AB Why and how do librarians and graduate students decide to enter the 
field of sci-tech librarianship? A survey was created and distributed 
using e-mail discussion groups to answer this question. Factors 
relevant in this decision were solicited from both practicing sci-tech 
librarians and library school students. The three hundred eleven 
respondents included personal opinions and anecdotes in their replies. 
Topics discussed included the influence of a sci-tech background on job 
performance and professional association membership. In addition, some 
questions dealt with perceived expectations about sci-tech 
librarianship and their outcomes. Most of the respondents had come into 
sci-tech library positions with some type of background.
NO ID: 229

RT Journal
ID 3155
A1 Hackenberg,Jill M.
A1 Chu,Barbara
T1 Why does one choose Sci-Tech Librarianship? Findings of a survey
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2002
VO 23
IS 1
SP 3
OP 16
AB A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine why librarians 
found themselves working in sci-tech library positions. Openended 
questions were included in the survey to solicit personal opinions and 
anecdotes regarding the choice of sci-tech librarianship. Three hundred 
eleven responses were received. Approximately 60% of the respondents 
indicated that they had some type of science background before becoming 
sci-tech librarians. Fifty-seven percent of the total pool replied that 
they intended to become sci-tech librarians from the start. Reasons for 
this choice are discussed, along with perceived expectations about sci-
tech librarianship. This article builds upon a previous discussion of 
findings from this questionnaire, found in College and Research 
Libraries, v. 61 n. 5 (September 2000).
NO ID: 661
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v23n01_02&i=1&s=J122&v=23

RT Book, Whole
ID 3156
A1 Hahn,Karla L.
T1 Electronic ecology : a case study of electronic journals in context
YR 2001
SP 79
AB In the late twentieth century, the development and widespread 
adoption of the World Wide Web accelerated the appearance of both new 
all-electronic journals and electronic counterparts of existing print 
journals. At the time this study was initiated in late 1997, electronic 
journals were still largely experimental. Little was known about their 
success or how they might be developed to attract both content and 
readership. In early 1998, the ecology community offered an opportunity 
that seemed in many ways an ideal natural experiment, allowing me to 
compare a fully electronic journal with one that was published in both 
print and electronic forms, both serving the same community. The 
ecology community was at the very earliest stages of developing a new 
communications system. Two new peer-reviewed journals were starting up 
in quite similar subject areasæone electronic only, and the other 
publishing print and electronic versions simultaneously, which acted in 
many ways as a sort of control. I chose to focus on content 
development—how the authors of the manuscripts and the editors who 
select and solicit material were viewing electronic publishing—an 
aspect of electronic publishing that had attracted little attention.
NO ID: 854
PB Association of Research Libraries
PP Washington, DC
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/cZ286.E43+.H34+2001

RT Journal
ID 3157
A1 Hahn,Karla L.
A1 Schmidt,Kari
T1 Web Communications and Collections Outreach to Faculty
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2005
VO 66
IS 1
SP 28
OP 40
AB A library’s Web site can provide a powerful forum for communicating 
with users about changes occurring in local collecting practices and 
their relationship to larger issues of scholarly communication. This 
survey of SPARC member Web sites examines how information on collection 
changes and scholarly communication issues is presented. Although a few 
institutions use their Web sites to inform users and connect the local 
and the global, most present little or no information on these topics. 
When collections information is present, it usually appears on either 
dedicated collections pages or faculty services pages. Typically, 
collections pages focus on largely static information describing 
services and policies. Information on changes in collection building is 
uncommon. Scholarly communication information is even scarcer and is 
rarely linked to information on local collection development or 
management.
NO ID: 560
UL 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crljournal/backissues2005a/crljan0
5/crljanab05.htm

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3158
A1 Hahn,Karla L.
A1 Schoch,Natalie A.
T1 Applying diffusion theory to electronic publishing: A conceptual 
framework for examining issues and outcomes
YR 1997
AB Diffusion of innovations theory offers a powerful paradigm for 
conceptualizing the development and acceptance of electronic publishing 
ventures. Investigations of the diffusion of other innovations suggest 
that acceptance or adoption is significantly influenced by innovation 
characteristics and adopter perceptions. Electronic publishing can best 
be understood as a cluster of related innovations which can be 
incorporated in different combinations. Cluster members individually 
and in combination influence adopter perceptions of the relative 
advantage, complexity, compatibility, visibility, and trialability of a 
particular implementation. Acceptance of electronic publishing is 
further shaped by the requirement of a contingent adoption decision by 
a community. For instance, readers cannot adopt an electronic 
publication without author acceptance. This paper will define the 
innovation cluster and provide a framework to characterize several 
recent publishing ventures demonstrating how the framework facilitates 
comparison and evaluation of individual implementations of electronic 
publishing ventures.
NO ID: 730
T2 ASIS '97: Digital Collections: Implications for Users, Funders, 
Developers, and Maintainers
PB American society for Information science
PP Washington, D. C.
UL http://www.asis.org/annual-97/hahnk.htm

RT Report
ID 3159
A1 Haider,Ghulam
A1 Kennedy,Suella
A1 McCuen,Pam
T1 Marketing and Public Relations
YR 1997
FD May 2, 1997
AB Report written for a library class at the University of Illinois. It 
has a good bibliography for marketing in special Libraries at: 
http://alexia.lis.uiuc.edu/~lis405/marketing/405s3.htm
NO ID: 306
PP Champaign-Urbana, IL
T3 Tertiary Marketing and Public Relations
UL http://alexia.lis.uiuc.edu/~lis405/marketing/405g1.htm

RT Journal
ID 3162
A1 Hallmark,Julie
T1 Access and retrieval of recent journal articles: a comparative study 
of chemists and geoscientists
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2004
IS 40
AB This study describes the methods of access and retrieval of recent 
journal articles cited by geoscientists and chemists who work in 
academia, government, and industry. Citations, originally published 
during 2002, were selected from the references in current articles in 
20 journal titles in the geosciences and 14 in chemistry. Each author 
received a personalized letter and brief questionnaire that addressed 
the methods of access and retrieval of one of those citations. Not 
surprisingly, a majority of respondents in both disciplines reported 
using the Internet for both access and retrieval, and many added 
insightful, substantive remarks that added depth and detail to the data 
analysis. The return rates of 75% in geoscience and 57% in chemistry 
suggest a high level of concern among these scientists for their 
journal literature. A comparison of the present results with similar 
unpublished data from a 1998 study illustrates the rapid evolution and 
acceptance of electronic journals; five years ago a majority of 
scientists in both disciplines used traditional (non-electronic) 
methods for access and retrieval of recent citations. Analysis of the 
information-seeking behavior of chemists and geologists as represented 
by citation patterns offers a unique view of the scientific endeavor.
NO ID: 663
UL http://www.istl.org/04-summer/article1.html

RT Book, Section
ID 3161
A1 Hallmark,Julie
T1 The effects of technology on the information-seeking behavior of 
scientists
YR 1995
SP 51
OP 56
AB Chemistry -- Internet resources. Information needs
NO ID: 425
A2 Haner,Barbara E.
A2 O'Donnell,Jim
T2 Changing gateways: the impact of technology on geoscience 
information exchange - Geoscience Information Society. Meeting (29th 
:1994 :Seattle, Wash.)
PB Geoscience Information Society

RT Journal
ID 3160
A1 Hallmark,Julie
T1 Scientists' access and retrieval of references cited in their recent 
journal articles
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1994
FD May
VO 55
IS 3
SP 199
OP 209
AB Discusses the scientists' access and retrieval of references cited 
in their recent journal articles. Explanations of their processes; 
Occurrence of actual retrieval through library subscriptions and copies 
form colleagues; Variations in the use of databases, current awareness 
services and personal journals.
NO ID: 374

RT Journal
ID 3163
A1 Han,Lifeng
A1 Goulding,Anne
T1 Information and reference services in the digital library
JF Information Services & Use
YR 2003
VO 23
IS 4
SP 251
OP 262
AB Information and reference services are one major component of 
library services. This article attempts to describe the paradigm of 
information and reference services in the digital library. Based on the 
fact that automatic digital library technologies are solving more and 
more information needs and changing the mode of user service, the 
authors suggest a three-levelled system that supports users' 
information needs. The role of reference librarians at each level is 
discussed. Finally, digital reference service, a new means of 
delivering services, is briefly reviewed. The authors emphasize that a 
systematic process to support users' information needs in the digital 
library is required.
NO ID: 566

RT Journal
ID 3164
A1 Harnad,Stevan
T1 The invisible hand of peer review
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 1998
IS November 5
AB The refereed journal literature needs to be freed from both paper 
and its associated production costs, but not from the process of peer 
review, whose "invisible hand" is what maintains its quality. Is there 
a way to continue providing this quality at no cost to the reader?
NO ID: 154

RT Book, Section
ID 3165
A1 Harper,James
T1 "What--do you get a brain with that?": Journal access paradigm 
change at a liberal arts university
YR 2001
SP 101
OP 105
AB Rising subscription costs for research journals, especially in the 
natural sciences, remain one of the most pressing problems facing 
college and university libraries. Many institutions have addressed this 
problem through a change from a paradigm of journal ownership to one of 
journal access. This study was conducted at Furman University.
NO ID: 288
A2 Thompson,Hugh A.
T2 Crossing the divide : proceedings of the Tenth National Conference 
of the Association of College and Research Libraries, March 15-18, 
2001, Denver, Colorado
PB ACRL
PP Denver, CO
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/papers01/harper.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3166
A1 Harper,Judith A.
T1 Citation Inaccuracy in a Scientific Journal: A Continuing Issue
JF Sci Technol Libr
YR 2001
VO 20
IS 4
SP 39
OP 44
K1 Bibliographical citations -- Evaluation. Periodicals, Scientific and 
technical. Citation inaccuracy, reference inaccuracy, reference 
accuracy, citation accuracy, reference errors, citation errors
AB Three hundred and fourteen (20%) of the citations found in 
Environmental and Experimental Botany, volumes 41-42, 1999, were 
selected randomly and checked for accuracy. There were 232 errors 
identified. At least one error was found in 45.4% of the citations. 
While more than one-half of the citations with errors had only one 
error, one citation had seven and one had eight errors. There was an 
increase in the percentage of citations with errors and in the number 
of errors per citation compared to a 1990 study of the same journal.
NO BLIB02100941 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0194-262X Details: 
bibl tab. article feature article; ID: 478

RT Journal
ID 3167
A1 Harris,Lesley Ellen
T1 Libraries and E-commerce: Improving Information Services and Beyond
JF Information Outlook
YR 2000
VO 4
IS 3
SP 24
OP 30
AB Describes how e-commerce can be used to promote your library, 
influence people to visit the library in person, or pay a membership 
fee to use your library.
NO ID: 307

RT Journal
ID 3168
A1 Hart,Judith L.
A1 Coleman,Vicki
A1 Yu,Hong
T1 Marketing Electronic Resources and Services: Surveying Faculty Use 
as a First Step
JF Reference Librarian
YR 2000
IS 67-68
SP 41
OP 55
AB A Texas A&M University study concluded that "a lack of information 
is the greatest obstacle to the use of electronic resources." They 
detailed how they placed a greater emphasis on outreach to the faculty 
and how they used marketing strategies.
NO ID: 308

RT Journal
ID 3169
A1 Harter,Stephen P.
A1 Ford,Charlotte E.
T1 Web-based analyses of E-journal impact: Approaches, problems, and 
issues
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 13
SP 1159
OP 1176
AB This study[Note 1] assesses the ways in which citation searching of 
scholarly print journals is and is not analogous to backlink searching 
of scholarly e-journal articles on the WWW, and identifies problems and 
issues related to conducting and interpreting such searches. Backlink 
searches are defined here as searches for Web pages that link to a 
given URL. Backlink searches were conducted on a sample of 39 scholarly 
electronic journals. Search results were processed to determine the 
number of backlinking pages, total backlinks, and external backlinks 
made to the e-journals and to their articles. The results were compared 
to findings from a citation study performed on the same e-journals in 
1996. A content analysis of a sample of the files backlinked to e-
journal articles was also undertaken. The authors identify a number of 
reliability issues associated with the use of raw search engine data to 
evaluate the impact of electronic journals and articles. No correlation 
was found between backlink measures and ISI citation measures of e-
journal impact, suggesting that the two measures may be assessing 
something quite different. Major differences were found between the 
types of entities that cite, and those that backlink, e-journal 
articles, with scholarly works comprising a very small percentage of 
backlinking files. These findings call into question the legitimacy of 
using backlink searches to evaluate the scholarly impact of e-journals 
and e-journal articles (and by extension, e-journal authors).
NO ID: 226

RT Report
ID 3170
A1 Harter,Stephen P.
A1 Kim,Hak Joon
T1 Electronic journals and scholarly communication: a citation and 
reference study
YR 1996
AB Many commentators have conjectured about the nature and promise of 
future scholarly electronic journals, and some have even predicted the 
eventual demise of the journal in its present paper form. [1] However, 
as Ann Okerson wrote, "One can fantasize endlessly about electronic 
'journals,' but without active authorship and readership there is 
nothing." [2] Even beyond this, e-journals must be used. "Use" implies 
not only reading e-journals and contributing to them, but building on 
the findings reported--it implies that the research reported in e-
journal articles have an impact on scholars and researchers in the 
discipline which the e-journal represents. If e-journals have little or 
no impact on research and researchers, they cannot play an important 
role in scholarly communication. This article reports hard empirical 
data on the impact of the first wave of e-journals on the scholarly 
communities they serve. It assesses the extent to which scholars and 
researchers are aware of, are influenced by, and build their own work 
upon research published in e-journals. It does this by examining the 
artifacts of scholarly communication--the journal article and the 
references it makes.
NO To be delivered at the ASIS Midyear Meeting, San Diego, CA, May 20-
22, 1996. Eventually Published in The Public-Access Computer Systems 
Review 7, no. 5 (1996).; ID: 237
T3 Tertiary Electronic journals and scholarly communication: a citation 
and reference study
UL http://info.lib.uh.edu/pr/v7/n5/hart7n5.html

RT Journal
ID 3171
A1 Haug,J. D.
T1 Physicians' preferences for information sources: a meta-analytic 
study
JF Bull Med Libr Assoc
JO Bull.Med.Libr.Assoc.
YR 1997
FD Jul
VO 85
IS 3
SP 223
OP 232
K1 (Major): Information Services
K1 Libraries, Medical
K1 Physicians
K1 (Minor): Human
K1 Interprofessional Relations
K1 Questionnaires
AB Identification of the resources physicians use to acquire 
information for clinical practice and medical research is an important 
area of research for health sciences librarianship and medical 
practice. During the past twenty years several studies have addressed 
questions about physicians' preferences for information sources, but 
generalization from the results of these studies has been hampered by 
limited sampling, diverse methods, and varied reportorial formats. 
Meta-analysis provides a method for reducing these limits. Using a 
meta-analytic procedure, this study reviews twelve studies published 
between 1978 and 1992, categorizes and ranks the physicians' preferred 
information sources reported in each study, then aggregates and counts 
the frequencies of the top six preferences, as well as the associated 
first and second preferences, for all the study populations or their 
strata. The results indicate that physicians prefer to obtain 
information from journals and books, but also that they often consult 
colleagues to get answers to clinical and research questions. The 
implications of these findings for health sciences librarianship are 
briefly discussed.
NO PMID: 9285121; Medline: 97431022 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 
0025-7338; NLM Unique Journal Identifier: 0421037 English Index Medicus 
Journal Article; Meta-Analysis Citation: Status: Completed Owner: NLM; 
ID: 438
AD Academic Library Services, East Carolina University, Greenville, 
North Carolina 27858, USA.

RT Journal
ID 3172
A1 Hawkins,Donald T.
T1 Bibliometrics of electronic journals in information science
JF Information Research
YR 2001
VO 7
IS 1
AB The bibliometric characteristics of electronic journals (e-journals) 
covering the field of information science have been studied. Twenty-
eight e-journals were identified and ranked by number of articles on 
the subject they published. A Bradford plot revealed that the core is 
not well developed yet, but it will likely contain six journals. The 
publication of information science articles in e-journals began about 
1990. In 1995 (the starting date for this study), a modest 26 articles 
appeared, but publication has now risen to approximately 250 articles 
per year. The most prolific authors are identified. The vast majority 
of them are located in the United States or United Kingdom. Only 26 
articles have authors from more than one country, showing that 
electronic technology has not yet strongly influenced international 
collaboration. About 2/3 of the articles originate in academic 
institutions. Common topics of e-journal articles in information 
science include electronic information, electronic publishing, virtual 
(digital) libraries, information search and retrieval, and use of the 
Internet. Seven online databases cover these e-journals; Information 
Science Abstracts is the only one to cover all 28 journals, and it has 
the highest number of abstracts from them - over 1,100.
NO ID: 709
UL http://informationr.net/ir/7-1/paper120.html

RT Journal
ID 3173
A1 Healy,Leigh Watson
T1 New Bottles for Old Wine? California State University initiates an 
electronic core collection
JF Educom Review
YR 1999
VO 34
IS 3 (May/June)
SP 46
OP 49
NO ID: 240

RT Book, Whole
ID 3176
A1 Heck,Andre
T1 Information handling in astronomy: historical vistas
YR 2003
SP 294
AB Half a Century of Intense Maturation / A. Heck 1 Evolution of Time 
Measurement in Astronomy / E. Biemont 15 Evolution of Data Processing 
in Optical Astronomy: A Personal Account / R. Albrecht 25 IHAP: Image 
Handling and Processing System / P. Grosbol, P. Biereichel 61 FITS: A 
Remarkable Achievement in Information Exchange / E. W. Greisen 71 
Munich Image Data Analysis System / K. Banse 89 AIPS, the VLA, and the 
VLBA / E. W. Greisen 109 Changes in Astronomical Publications during 
the 20th Century / H. A. Abt 127 Evolution and Role of the Astronomical 
Library and Librarian / B. G. Corbin 139 Development of the Astronomy 
Digital Library / G. Eichhorn 157 From Early Directories to Current 
Yellow-Page Services / A. Heck 183 Pre-college Astronomy Education in 
the United States in the Twentieth Century / J. E. Bishop 207 Birth and 
Evolution of the Planetarium / C. C. Petersen 233 Changing Role of the 
IAU in Providing and Organising Information / A. Batten, D. McNally 249 
Was the Carte du Ciel an Obstruction to the Development of Astrophysics 
in Europe? / D. H. P. Jones 267 Amateur Data and Astronomical 
Discoveries in the 20th Century / S. Dunlop 275
NO ID: 850
PB Kluwer Academic PublishersHeck, Andre
PP Boston
SN 1402011784
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/cQB51.3.E43+I544+2003

RT Book, Whole
ID 3174
A1 Heck,Andre
T1 Information handling in astronomy
YR 2000
AB Foreword - The information flow in astronomy Information in 
astronomy: The role of the IAU / J. Andersen 1 Astronomy and the news 
media / S. P. Maran, L. R. Cominsky, L. A. Marschall 13 Public outreach 
in astronomy: The ESO experience / C. Madsen, R. M. West 25 New 
frontiers in NASA data management / C. Cheung, D. Leisawitz 45 FITS 
experience: Lessons learned / D. C. Wells 65 use of the IRAF system at 
NOAO / G. H. Jacoby, D. Tody 73 Starlink: Astronomical computing in the 
United Kingdom / P. T. Wallace, R. F. Warren-Smith 93 Computer-assisted 
context analysis of databases containing scientific literature / R. 
Albrecht 109 Computational astronomy: Current directions and future 
perspectives / F. Murtagh 121 Information handling for the Hubble Space 
Telescope / R. J. Hanisch 135 To be editor in chief of a primary 
scientific journal: From manual work to electronic publication / J. 
Lequeux 155 Astronomy libraries 2000: Context, coordination, 
cooperation / U. Grothkopf 165 Astronomy education: Description, 
organization, and information / J. R. Percy 175 Astronomy teaching at 
the Open University / A. J. Norton, B. W. Jones, U. C. Kolb 187 role of 
the planetrium / C. C. Petersen, M. C. Petersen 195 Data handling in 
the AAVSO: An example from a large organization of amateur astronomers 
/ J. A. Mattei, E. O. Waagen 205 From data files to information hubs: 
Beyond technologies and methodologies / A. Heck 223
NO ID: 851
A2 Heck,Andre
PB Kluwer Academic PublishersHeck, Andre
PP Boston
SN 0792364945
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/cQB14.2+.I55+2000

RT Book, Whole
ID 3175
A1 Heck,Andre
T1 Organizations and strategies in astronomy, Volume 4
YR 2000
NO ID: 852
PB Kluwer Academic PublishersHeck, Andre
PP Boston
SN 1402015267
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/cQB61+.O74+2000

RT Journal
ID 3177
A1 Heidorn,P. Bryan
A1 Mehra,Bharat
A1 Lokhaiser,Mary F.
T1 Complementary user-centered methodologies for information seeking 
and use: system's design in the biological information browsing 
environment (BIBE)
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 14
SP 1251
OP 1258
AB Complementary, socially grounded, user-centered methodologies are 
being used to design new information systems to support biodiversity 
informatics. Each of the methods--interviews, focus groups, field 
observations, immersion, and lab testing--has its own strengths and 
weaknesses. Methods vary in their ability to reveal the automatic 
processes of experts (that need to be learned by novices), data 
richness, and their ability to help interpret complex information needs 
and processes. When applied in concert, the methods provide a much 
clearer picture of the use of information while performing a real life 
information-mediated task. This picture will be used to help inform the 
design of a new information system, Biological Information Browsing 
Environment (BIBE). The groups being studied are high school students, 
teachers, and volunteer adult groups performing biodiversity surveys. 
In this task the people must identify and record information about many 
species of flora and fauna. Most of the information tools they use for 
training and during the survey are designed to facilitate the difficult 
species identification task.
NO ID: 844
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/100519806/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3178
A1 Hektor,Anders
T1 Information activities on the Internet in everyday life
JF New Review of Information Behaviour Research
YR 2003
VO 4
IS 1
SP 127
OP 138
AB In this article eight forms of information activities are suggested 
to describe a model of information behaviour in non-work everyday life. 
This model builds on literature reviews and data from 10 cases of 
information users. Findings from applying the model are also presented 
and their implications discussed. The conclusion states that the 
Internet takes the role of a complementary information system in 
everyday life, side by side with existing information systems.
NO ID: 681

RT Journal
ID 3179
A1 Henderson,Albert
T1 The library collection failure quotient: the ratio of interlibrary 
borrowing to collection size
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2000
VO 26
IS 3
SP 159
OP 170
AB Understanding the ratio of interlibrary borrowing to collection size 
(i.e., access to ownership) may help us to understand the performance 
of the collection. The library collection failure quotient (CFQ) is a 
dynamic indicator. Interpreting CFQ scores requires references to other 
indicators, comparisons with peer libraries, and information gleaned 
from library patrons.
NO ID: 629
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(00)00102-6

RT Report
ID 3180
A1 Henry,Marcia
T1 Cited Reference Searching: New Avenues for Librarian Faculty 
Collaboration
YR 2005
FD June 27
SP 1
OP 2
AB Poster paper presented at the ALA Annual COnference, STS Research 
Forum. Searching for cited references has had important implication for 
bibliographic research. It has offered a way to retrieve related 
research without reliance on keyword selection, but it has also been an 
important indicator of research value. Highly cited research enhances 
the research and its parent organization as well as the journal or 
publisher where it first appeared. . This poster explores the 
retrievals and mechanisms involved in searching not only the ISI 
Science Citation Index, but indexes such as CINAHL, full text 
subscription databases such as Science Direct, as well as search 
engines such as the recently released Google Scholar. The purpose of 
the poster is to identify and promote new ways to find cited 
references. It addresses:High costs of the traditional ISI Citation 
Indexes. Explores if other methods can pick up additional cited 
references. Are open source scholarly journals indexed? Are the cited 
references in open sources publications identified in the available 
cited reference databases ? In Search engines? Are the references being 
monitored? Opportunities for Librarians to assist faculty in tracking 
their cited references in a dynamic publication environment Since many 
of the new ways of cited reference searching many not match the 
traditional ISI methods, a sample web page designed to lead and 
instruct patrons on how to extend their search for cited references in 
non traditional ways is given. A list of credits with URLs for other 
Libraries who are providing tutorials and suggestions on cited 
reference searching will be included.
NO ID: 837
PP Chicago
T3 Tertiary Cited Reference Searching: New Avenues for Librarian 
Faculty Collaboration
UL 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/aboutacrl/acrlsections/sciencetech/stsconfe
rences/posters05.htm

RT Journal
ID 3181
A1 Herkert,Joseph R.
A1 Nielsen,Christine S.
T1 Reflections on the future: Special issue on the NSF/IEEE Workshop on 
the socioeconomic dimensions of electronic publishing
JF Journal of Electronic Publishing
YR 1998
VO 4
IS 2
K1 NSF, IEEE, economic, economy, needs, scientific and engineering 
community, communities
NO ID: 152

RT Journal
ID 3182
A1 Hernon,Peter
A1 Schwartz,Candy
T1 The word “research:” Having to live with a misunderstanding
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2002
VO 4
IS 3
SP 207
OP 208
AB Every day, while watching television, reading a newspaper, listening 
to the radio, or surfing the Web, we hear about, or are asked to 
participate in, polls that register our opinions, likes, or dislikes on 
matters ranging from national policy to products and individuals. The 
assumption of many of those doing these polls is that they are 
conducting research. Furthermore, while at home, we are often 
interrupted by marketing firms, making demands on our time under the 
guise of conducting research. To make matters worse, these firms now 
invade our e-mail inboxes with solicitations and requests to share our 
thoughts.
NO ID: 523

RT Journal
ID 3183
A1 Hernon,Peter
A1 Schwartz,Candy
T1 Next Generation of Researchers
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2002
VO 24
IS 4
SP 309
OP 310
AB Recently, on returning from several professional conferences, we 
remarked to each other that we were impressed with the number of 
excellent presentations we had attended in which research findings had 
been presented. It was nice to hear about research in which the 
investigators discussed usability studies, the strengths and weaknesses 
of think aloud–think after protocol, content analysis, transactional 
log analysis, and issues of reliability and validity. Survey research 
was not prevalent at the sessions we attended.
NO ID: 525

RT Journal
ID 3185
A1 Herring,Susan Davis
T1 Use of Electronic Resources in Scholarly Electronic Journals: A 
Citation Analysis
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2002
VO 63
IS 4
SP 334
OP 340
AB Analyzes the research articles from scholarly electronic journals 
published in 1999–2000. Details on the information gathering and use 
patterns of scholars; Information on the types and subject areas of 
online resources being referenced; Advantages of electronic journals 
over print journals.
NO ID: 546

RT Journal
ID 3184
A1 Herring,Susan Davis
T1 Faculty Acceptance of the World Wide Web for Student Research
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2001
VO 62
IS 3
SP 251
OP 258
NO ID: 491

RT Journal
ID 3186
A1 Hertzum,Morten
A1 Pejterson,Annelise Mark
T1 The information-seeking practices of engineers: searching for 
documents as well as for people
JF Information Processing and Management
YR 2000
VO 36
IS 5
SP 761
OP 778
AB Engineers get most of their information from colleagues and internal 
reports. This study investigates how engineers’ information-seeking 
practices intertwine looking for informing documents with looking for 
informed people. Based on case studies in two product-development 
organisations we find that engineers search for documents to find 
people, search for people to get documents, and interact socially to 
get information without engaging in explicit searches. This intricate 
interplay between document and people sources can be explained by the 
nature of the design task. Many possible solutions are normally 
available to the designer and in choosing one over the others the 
designer must take into account a complex set of issues involving both 
the product as such and its context. However, design documentation 
seems to be biased toward technical aspects of the chosen solution, 
while information about the context of the design process is typically 
not available. Hence, people become a critical source of information 
because they can explain and argue about why specific decisions were 
made and what purpose is served by individual parts of the design. 
While document retrieval is a well-established field, this study 
concludes by briefly outlining how computer systems could support 
searches for people. Given the immense practical importance of searches 
for people there seems to be a large need for such systems and, 
consequently, for addressing the open research questions involved in 
designing them.
NO ID: 864
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4573(00)00011-X

RT Journal
ID 3187
A1 Hérubel,Jean-Pierre V. M.
T1 Philosophy dissertation bibliographies and citations in serials 
evaluation
JF Serials Librarian
YR 1991
VO 20
IS 2-3
SP 65
OP 73
AB Comparison of serials cited in 51 Purdue University dissertations 
against the library's periodical holdings. Citation analysis College 
and university libraries -- Serial publications. Academic 
dissertations, Periodicals, Philosophy, Evaluation.
NO ID: 376

RT Journal
ID 3189
A1 Hill,J. B.
A1 Madarash-Hill,Cherie
A1 Hayes,Nancy
T1 Remote storage of serials: its impact on use at the University of 
Akron
JF The Serials Librarian
YR 2000
FD 2000article feature article
VO 39
IS 1
SP 29
OP 39
K1 Descriptor: Scientific and technical libraries -- Serial 
publications.
K1 Scientific and technical libraries -- Ohio.
K1 Use studies -- Serial publications.
K1 Storage of books, periodicals, etc.
K1 Named Corp: University of Akron. Libraries -- Serial publications
NO ID: 282

RT Journal
ID 3188
A1 Hill,J. B.
A1 Madarash-Hill,Cherie
A1 Hayes,Nancy
T1 Monitoring serials use in a science and technology library: results 
of a ten year study at the University of Akron
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 1999
FD 1999article feature article
VO 18
IS 1
SP 89
OP 103
K1 Descriptor: Use studies -- Serial publications.
K1 Scientific and technical libraries -- Ohio.
K1 Scientific and technical libraries -- Serial publications.
K1 Named Corp: University of Akron. Libraries
NO ID: 281

RT Journal
ID 3190
A1 Hiller,Steve
T1 How Different Are They? A Comparison By Academic Area Of Library 
Use, Priorities, and Information Needs at the University of Washington
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2002
IS 33
AB The University of Washington Libraries has conducted large-scale 
library surveys on a triennial cycle since 1992. These surveys are sent 
to all faculty members and a random sample of graduate and 
undergraduate students. Surveys measure user satisfaction with library 
services and resources and have also included questions on the reasons 
faculty and students use (or don't use) libraries, use and application 
of electronic information, importance of information resources, and 
their priorities for library services and resources. Survey results 
comprise a rich lode of information about library use and needs during 
a period of rapid change in the information environment. The University 
of Washington Libraries is unique not only in the regularity of its 
systematic surveying of the user community but also in the large number 
of surveys that are returned, especially by faculty (1,100 to 1,500 for 
each survey). The size and representative nature of the respondent pool 
has enabled us to generalize for the population as a whole and do 
statistical analysis by academic subject area. One of the more striking 
findings of this analysis has been the substantial differences shown in 
library/information needs and use by those in different subject fields. 
This paper will focus on the differences (and also some similarities) 
between scientists/engineers and other academic areas in their library 
use and information needs at a large American research university.
NO ID: 703
UL http://www.istl.org/02-winter/article1.html

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3191
A1 Hoffman,Kristin
A1 al.,et
T1 Library book use by science and engineering undergraduates
YR 2005
AB We created a web-based questionnaire and sent the URL to all Science 
and Engineering students via bulk e-mail. Faculty members were also 
informed of the survey, and were invited to share the URL with their 
students and encourage them to participate. An announcement was also 
posted to the Library’s homepage. Of all the recruitment methods, the 
bulk e-mail proved to be the most effective.
NO ID: 841
T2 SLA Annual Conference
PP Toronto, ONT
UL http://www.sla.org/division/dche/2005/hoffmann.pdf

RT Book, Section
ID 3192
A1 Holland,Maurita Peterson
T1 Modeling the engineering information professional
YR 1998
SP 31
OP 43
NO Co-published simultaneously as Science & technology libraries, 
v17(2) 1998, pp. 31-43.; ID: 221
A2 Hallmark,Julie
A2 Seidman,Ruth K.
T2 Sci/tech librarianship : education and training
PB Haworth
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 3193
A1 Holland,Maurita Peterson
A1 Powell,Christina Kelleher
T1 A longitudinal survey of the information seeking and use habits of 
some engineers
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1995
IS January
SP 7
OP 15
AB From 1978 to 1990 the college of engineering at the U of michigan 
offered a library course - Information resources for engineers. This is 
a follow up study to determine the impact of that course. Data lead to 
the conclusion that there is a relationship between those that took the 
course and their current use of information resources. Revealed that 
there is widespread interest in learning more about electronic 
information retrieval.
NO ID: 68

RT Journal
ID 3194
A1 Holleman,Curt
T1 Electronic Resources: Are Basic Criteria for the Selection of 
Materials Changing?
JF Library Trends
YR 2000
VO 48
IS 4
SP 694
OP 710
AB Examines whether traditional selection criteria are changing in the 
electronic era of information. Basic criteria for selection; General 
concerns facing the decision-maker who chooses electronic resources; 
Importance of library relevancy and technical aspects.
NO ID: 715
UL http://0-
search.epnet.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&
an=3595913

RT Journal
ID 3195
A1 Holliday,Wendy
A1 Li,Qin
T1 Understanding the millennials: updating our knowledge about students
JF Reference Services Review
YR 2004
VO 32
IS 4
SP 356
OP 366
AB Brings together recent research on undergraduate information 
behavior, including preliminary findings of a qualitative study testing 
Kuhlthau's Information Search Process (ISP) model. The main methods 
include a literature review of undergraduate attitudes and information 
behavior and a qualitative study of 35 undergraduates. The data were 
coded into the original ISP model to test how it holds up with a new 
generation of students. Finds that the Millennial Generation 
increasingly turns to the web rather than the library as its primary 
information resource and also that the ISP model holds up for many of 
the students in the study. The easy access to information, however, 
suggests some changes to the model. It enables some students to skip 
steps in the process, especially focus formulation, because many 
students stop after their preliminary searches, thinking that they have 
completed the research process. The study is a qualitative study with a 
small sample, so findings cannot be generalized. The findings are also 
preliminary. The paper brings together a wide range of literature and 
can provide instruction librarians with a more coherent and updated 
view of the Millennial Generation in order to improve instruction for 
this group of students.
NO ID: 622
UL http://lysander.emeraldinsight.com/vl=1785161/cl=164/nw=1/rpsv/cgi-
bin/linker?ini=emerald&reqidx=/cw/mcb/00907324/v32n4/s5/p356

RT Journal
ID 3196
A1 Houle,Louis
A1 Scott,Bridgette
T1 The CISTI Source/SUMO Experience at McGill University: Four Years 
Later
JF Serials Librarian
YR 2002
VO 42
IS 3/4
SP 217
OP 221
AB Focuses on the financial problems encountered by libraries on the 
soaring cost of journal subscriptions in Canada. Allocation of funds 
for print journals; Factors affecting the quantity of journal 
subscriptions; Use of interlibrary loans as alternative to print 
journal subscriptions.
NO ID: 540

RT Book, Section
ID 3197
A1 Howard,Dara Lee
T1 What the eye sees while predicting a document's pertinence from its 
citation
YR 1991
SP 87
OP 101
K1 Descriptor: Citation analysis -- Evaluation.
K1 Cognition
NO BLIB92006808 Provider: OCLC; il. 0938734563 Related Record: 
blib92006375 English analytic; ID: 452
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (54th :1991 
:Washington, D.C.). ASIS '91 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Journal
ID 3198
A1 Howze,Philip C.
T1 PERSPECTIVES ON...Collegiality, Collegial Management, and Academic 
Libraries
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 1
SP 40
OP 43
AB Addresses the differences between collegiality and congeniality in 
the concept of library management. Definition of collegiality; Elements 
of collegial management style; Advantages and disadvantages of the 
style.
NO ID: 528

RT Journal
ID 3199
A1 Hsieh-Yee,Ingrid
T1 Student use of online catalogs and other information channels
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1996
IS march
SP 161
OP 175
AB Survey of juniors at two universities, catholic university and 
university of the district of columbia, found online catalogs to be the 
most commonly used information channel. Analyses of selected 
characteristics of students showed that race, school and economic 
background contributed to differences in their information seeking 
behavior. Equal access to information does not lead to equal use.
NO ID: 69

RT Journal
ID 3200
A1 Hughes,Janet
T1 Can Document Delivery Compensate for Reduced Serials Holdings? A 
Life Sciences Library Perspective
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1997
FD Sep
VO 58
IS 5
SP 421
OP 431
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Costs
K1 Document Delivery
K1 Library Expenditures
K1 Serials
K1 Access to Information
K1 Higher Education
K1 Library Services
K1 Ownership
K1 Vendors
AB Discussion of access versus ownership for libraries facing rising 
serials cost, especially in biology and life science information. 
Focuses on a study at Pennsylvania State University that tested the 
feasibility of using commercial document delivery (CDD) as compensation 
for discontinued ownership, as a complement to ownership, and as a 
supplement to ownership. Positive results for CDD were found.
NO EJ552542; 0010-0870(199709)58:52.0.TX;2-Q English 0010-0870 Sep 1997 
421 199709 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR535795 CIJMAR1998 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 430

RT Journal
ID 3201
A1 Hughes,Janet A.
T1 Use of faculty publication lists and ISI citation data to identify a 
core list of journals with local importance
JF Libr Acquis
YR 1995
FD Winter
VO 19
SP 403
OP 413
K1 Descriptor: Citation indexes.
K1 College and university libraries -- Serial publications.
K1 Serial publications -- Subscriptions.
K1 Periodicals, Biological.
K1 Named Corp: Fred Lewis Pattee Library.
K1 Institute for Scientific Information
AB 50 molecular and cellular biology publications ranked for 
Pennsylvania State University. College and university libraries -- 
Serial publications. Serial publications -- Subscriptions. Periodicals, 
Biological. Fred Lewis Pattee Library. Institute for Scientific 
Information.
NO BLIB96004264 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0364-6408 Details: 
chart. article feature article; ID: 439

RT Journal
ID 3202
A1 Hughes,Janet A.
A1 Lee,Catherine A.
T1 Giving patrons what they want: the promise, process and pitfalls of 
providing full-text access to journals. experience at Pennsylvania 
State University
JF Collect Build
YR 1998
VO 17
IS 4
SP 148
OP 153
AB Descriptor: Information systems -- Special subjects -- Serial 
publications. Online catalogs -- Pennsylvania. College and university 
libraries -- Full-text databases. Fred Lewis Pattee Library.
NO BLIB98016040 Provider: OCLC; United Kingdom ISSN: 0160-4953 Details: 
chart. article feature article; ID: 460

RT Journal
ID 3203
A1 Hunter,Karen
T1 Looking back to look forward: "Chicken little redux" or strategic 
lessons learned: 2001 Miles Conrad Memorial Lecture, February 27, 2001
JF Information Services & Use
YR 2004
VO 24
IS 1
SP 27
OP 37
AB In many organizations "strategic planning" is an annual exercise 
that results in a document reviewed once and then essentially 
forgotten. However, strategic planning should be the process of setting 
priorities and of creating the framework for decision making about 
where to invest resources, at what level and with what urgency. The 
process itself should include periodic assessment of the quality of the 
decisions made and their implementation. Looking back at 25 years of 
strategic planning with a major STM publisher, this paper provides an 
informal and highly personal reflection on some of the lessons learned. 
Emphasis is given to newbusiness ventures and models. It also includes 
broad recommendations on ways to approach planning and management for 
future development.
NO ID: 567
UL http://iospress.metapress.com/link.asp?id=h1nu1m5dht8q5v4n

RT Journal
ID 3204
A1 Hunter,Karen
T1 Open access: yes, no, maybe
JF Nature (Web Focus)
YR 2004
AB Last month, Paul Saffo research director of the Institute of the 
Future1 in Menlo Park, California, told the board of the Copyright 
Clearance Center, at a meeting in Naples, Florida, that we were living 
in a period of 'unprecedented uncertainty'. I cannot imagine a more apt 
description. A decade ago the challenge to Science Technology and 
Medicine (STM) journal publishers was clear: move your journals to 
Internet distribution and do it in a way that increases both access and 
functionality. And we have done that. In the case of Elsevier's 
ScienceDirect, there are now over 5.6 million articles, at least 10 
million researchers regularly use the service and full text downloads 
are doubling annually, with an expectation of over 275 million 
downloads in 2004 (and another 100 million at sites that hold the files 
locally). It has cost more than ?200 million to create and maintain the 
service, including ?24 million to digitize the backfiles of all titles 
back to volume 1, number 1 (which for The Lancet was in 1823). But this 
investment was clearly what we needed to do to deliver that which the 
scientific community wants.
NO ID: 646
UL http://www.nature.com/nature/focus/accessdebate/3.html

RT Journal
ID 3212
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 Scientific Communication: New Roles and New Players
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 2004
VO 25
IS 1/2
SP 5
OP 22
AB Communication in science has evolved from a process dependent on 
print-on-paper to one increasingly reliant on electronic media as 
databases have replaced indexes and journals have shifted to electronic 
formats. This migration from print to electronic has transformed the 
roles of virtually all participants in the system of scientific 
communication. Scientist-authors, publishers, and librarians have all 
assumed new duties as the Internet and the World Wide Web have blurred 
boundaries and realigned responsibilities. This paper examines some of 
these changes in detail with reference to a communication model 
developed during a print-based time by sociologists William Garvey and 
Belver Griffith. An updated model of the current scientific 
communication system will be presented that incorporates developments 
that have changed the very nature of research and publishing and have 
altered, as well, the ways that libraries and librarians interact with 
scientists and publishers. The challenges associated with these changes 
are identified and discussed.
NO ID: 565
UL 
https://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ698
9HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&ID=47978

RT Book, Section
ID 3211
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 Digital collections: Acceptance and use in a research community
YR 2001
SP 312
OP 319
AB This paper describes a project designed to capture evidence of 
changing approaches to identifying, locating, organizing, and producing 
scientific information in a university-based research community. 
Faculty in the basic and health sciences were interviewed regarding 
their uses of electronic journals, databases, and other digital 
resources to support their teaching and research activities. The 
findings are intended to provide a better understanding of scientists’ 
use of digital collections for librarians who acquire and manage 
research collections and who develop services to faculty and students, 
especially those in pure and applied sciences.
NO ID: 290
A2 Thompson,Hugh A.
T2 Crossing the divide : proceedings of the Tenth National Conference 
of the Association of College and Research Libraries, March 15-18, 
2001, Denver, Colorado
PB ACRL
PP Denver, CO
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/papers01/hurd.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3209
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 The transformation of scientific communication: A model for 2020
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 14
SP 1279
OP 1283
AB Information technologies, particularly the personal computer and the 
World Wide Web, are changing the ways that scientists communicate. The 
traditional print-based system that relies on the refereed scientific 
journal as the key delivery mechanism for research findings is 
undergoing a transformation to a system much more reliant on electronic 
communication and storage media. This article offers a new paradigm for 
communication in science, and suggests how digital media might bring 
new roles and functionalities to participants. The argument is made 
that behavioral and organizational determinants are as important 
factors as technological capabilities in shaping the future.
NO ID: 207
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/74500450/START

RT Journal
ID 3210
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 Introduction and Overview
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
FD Dec
VO 51
IS 14
SP 1276
OP 1278
K1 Communication (Thought Transfer)
K1 Information Dissemination
K1 Sciences
K1 Computer Mediated Communication
K1 Electronic Publishing
K1 Information Science
K1 Publishing Industry
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Technological Advancement
AB This Perspectives issue of the "Journal of the American Society for 
Information Science" brings together a collection of papers that 
explore the behavioral and organizational aspects of the changing 
communication system of science. Authors address such issues as the 
adoption of computer-mediated communication by scientists, the changing 
roles of professional associations, emerging publication patterns, and 
the impact of electronic publishing on the peer review system. 
(Contains 6 references.) (AEF)
NO EJ618488; 0002-8231(200012)51:142.0.TX;2-A Theme issue topic: 
"Perspectives Issue on...The Changing Communication System of Science: 
Behavioral and Organizational Aspects." English 0002-8231 Dec 2000 1276 
200012 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR543202 CIJJUN2001 080 Journal 
Articles 141 Reports--Descriptive; ID: 432

RT Journal
ID 3208
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 Serials Management: Adrift During a Sea Change?
JF Journal of Library Administration
JO J.Libr.Admin.
YR 1999
FD 1999
VO 28
IS 2
SP 7789
K1 Library Administration
K1 Library Development
K1 Research Libraries
K1 Decision Making
K1 Futures (of Society)
K1 Periodicals
K1 Scholarly Communication
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Scholarly Writing
K1 Strategic Planning
AB Identifies some of the significant changes underway within and 
outside libraries and analyzes their potential impact on research 
libraries. Explores issues important to serials managers. Discusses 
strategies for data gathering to support management decisions and 
outlines unresolved questions that await future developments or require 
additional research. (Author/AEF)
NO EJ599703; English 0193-082 1999 7789 1999 Journal Article (CIJE) a 
IR540745 CIJJUL2000 080 Journal Articles 142 Reports--Evaluative; ID: 
433

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3207
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 From print to electronic: Are we there yet? How can we know?
YR 1997
AB Scientific communication is currently evolving from a print-based 
system reliant on the refereed scientific journal to a system that 
incorporates computer-mediated communication and new formats for 
disseminating information. The Internet, digital libraries, 
collaboratories, and emerging electronic journals are only some of the 
developments that will shape scientific communication in the future. As 
science librarians we are participants in the process along with 
scientists, publishers, database vendors, and others. This presentation 
will address what we know about the impact of information technology on 
scientific communication. How is the information seeking behavior of 
scientists changing? What research informs us? What else do we need to 
know? What methodologies offer promise of answering our questions about 
the transformation underway? What are the implications for library 
services?
NO Presented at the 1997 ALA Conference - STS section of ACRL. Session 
- "The Scientific Researcher: Hardwired for Retrieval or Wedded to 
Print?"; ID: 250
T2 ALA Conference
PP San Francisco
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/sts/pro-julie.html

RT Journal
ID 3206
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 ARL academic science and technology libraries: report of a survey
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1996
VO 57
IS March
SP 144
OP 159
AB The association of research libraries serves as a benchmark or a 
model for other institutions with respect to collection development and 
management, and the provision of information services. Has finding of a 
survey collected in 1993 and 1994. Describes the organizational 
structures, collections, expenditures, and surveys. Some comparisons 
are made to earlier surveys.
NO ID: 70

RT Journal
ID 3205
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
T1 Interdisciplinary Research in the Sciences: Implications for Library 
Organization
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1992
FD Jul
VO 53
IS 4
SP 283
OP 297
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Interdisciplinary Approach
K1 Scientific and Technical Information
K1 Scientific Research
K1 User Needs (Information)
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Chemistry
K1 College Faculty
K1 Higher Education
K1 Periodicals
K1 Tables (Data)
K1 Use Studies
AB A study which used citation analysis techniques to examine 
information use by faculty in a university chemistry department found 
that 49 percent of the journals cited were from fields other than 
chemistry. The implications of this finding for university libraries 
providing information services to scientists engaged in 
interdisciplinary research are considered. (22 references) (LAE)
NO EJ448919; 0010-0870(199207)53:42.0.TX;2-J English 0010-0870 Jul 1992 
283 199207 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR524954 CIJDEC1992 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 434

RT Journal
ID 3213
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
A1 Blecic,Deborah D.
A1 Vishwanatham,Rama
T1 Information Use by Molecular Biologists: Implications for Library 
Collections and Services
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1999
FD Jan
VO 60
IS 1
SP 31
OP 43
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Faculty Publishing
K1 Information Utilization
K1 Library Collection Development
K1 Library Services
K1 Molecular Biology
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Electronic Libraries
K1 Higher Education
K1 Journal Articles
K1 Scholarly Journals
AB Reports on findings from a citation analysis of publications of 
university molecular-biology faculty that examined materials cited in 
published articles to determine the nature of information used in their 
research. Ranked lists of cited journals provide implications for 
library services, collection development, and the potential for 
electronic services. (Author/LRW)
NO EJ582318; 0010-0870(199901)60:12.0.TX;2-M English 0010-0870 Jan 1999 
31 199901 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR539325 CIJOCT1999 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 431

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3214
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
A1 Weller,Ann C.
A1 Curtis,Karen L.
T1 Information seeking behavior of faculty: use of indexes and 
abstracts by scientists and engineers (of the University of Illinois at 
Chicago)
YR 1992
SP 136
OP 143
K1 University of Illinois at Chicago.
K1 Use studies Information systems.
K1 Information systems Special subjectsScience and technology.
K1 College and university libraries Reference services.
K1 Reference services Automation.
K1 Reference services Illinois
AB This research paper investigates information seeking behavior by 
science and engineering faculty and explores their use of major access 
tools such as Current Contents and Science Citation Index as a timely 
means of identifying research literature. We describe a survey of 
faculty in the pure and applied sciences carried out during autumn 1991 
to establish a baseline for a subsequent survey to assess the impact of 
availability of locally mounted databases.
NO ID: 130
T2 ASIS '92

RT Book, Section
ID 3215
A1 Hurd,Julie M.
A1 Weller,Ann C.
A1 Curtis,Karen L.
T1 Information seeking behavior of faculty: use of indexes and 
abstracts by scientists and engineers (of the University of Illinois at 
Chicago)
YR 1992
SP 136
OP 143
AB Descriptor: Use studies -- Information systems. Science and 
technology -- Databases. College and university libraries -- Reference 
services. Reference services -- Automation. Reference services -- 
Illinois. Named Corp: University of Illinois at Chicago. University 
Library.
NO BLIB92013321 Provider: OCLC; charts. 0938734695 Related Record: 
blib92013160 English analytic; ID: 444
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (55th :1992 
:Pittsburgh, Pa.). ASIS '92 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Journal
ID 3218
A1 Hurt,C. D.
T1 Conceptual citation differences in science, technology, and social 
sciences literature
JF Information Processing & Management
YR 1987
VO 23
IS 1
SP 1
OP 6
AB This study examined three disciplines and the literature to 
determine if there were any differences in conceptual referencing 
patterns. Physics, engineering, and sociology were examined using the 
actual literature of the disciplines for the year 1984. Samples were 
drawn from major abstracting and indexing services. A Dunn planned 
comparison approach was used to test for differences. The results of 
the testing indicated that physics, engineering, and sociology all 
differ in terms of conceptual references. Two sub-tests were performed 
on the data. Total number of references were examined, indicating no 
difference between physics and sociology, but distinct differences 
between physics and engineering and between sociology and engineering. 
The second sub-test examined the number of references to literature 
within a 5-year span of publication. This second test indicated 
differences between physics and sociology and between physics and 
engineering, but no difference between sociology and engineering. 
Suggestions for further study are offered.
NO ID: 552
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0306-4573(87)90033-1

RT Journal
ID 3216
A1 Hurt,Charlene
T1 Building libraries in the virtual age
JF College and Research Libraries News
YR 1997
IS february
SP 75
OP 76
AB Describes the vision of the johnson center library. Teaching and 
learning are becoming more collaborative. Experiential learning takes 
place anywhere. Electronic resources change the role of paper.
NO ID: 71

RT Journal
ID 3217
A1 Hurt,charlene
A1 Rein,laura
A1 Connors,maureen
A1 Walsh,john
A1 Wu,anna
T1 Collection development strategies for a university center library
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1995
IS November
SP 487
OP 495
AB Intent is to make the library a uniquely integrated component within 
a university center for student life. Focus on multiculturalism, 
diversity, core texts. Looks at processes, policies, and procedures in 
the development of such a collection.
NO ID: 72

RT Book, Whole
ID 3219
A1 Hurt,Charlie Deuel
T1 Information Sources in Science and Technology
YR 1998
AB Reference books -- Science - Technology -- Engineering -- 
Bibliography
NO ET: 3rd; Q158.5 .H87 1998; ID: 236
PB Libraries Unlimited, Inc
PP Englewood, CO
SN 1563085283

RT Journal
ID 3220
A1 Ingram,D. S.
A1 McCoy,J. D.
T1 Engineering Students and the Library: Teaching the Technology of 
Library Research
JF Engineering Education
YR 1990
VO 80
IS 4
SP 461
OP 462
NO ID: 880

RT Journal
ID 3221
A1 Jackson,Allyn
T1 The Digital Mathematics Library
JF Notices of the American Mathematical Society
YR 2003
VO 50
IS 8
SP 918
OP 923
AB Not long ago, Keith Dennis, a mathematician at Cornell University, 
walked into the departmental photocopying room and saw a bunch of old 
journals with articles tabbed for photocopying. He told the secretary 
assigned to make the copies that the journals are available 
electronically through the JSTOR journal storage website. She was 
delighted not to have to spend time standing in front of the copy 
machine. For his part, Dennis was puzzled that one of his colleagues 
evidently did not realize how easily one can get the material on the 
Web. “You would hope mathematicians would have some idea of where their 
literature is,” he said. “But that’s simply not true.”
NO ID: 579
UL http://www.ams.org/notices/200308/comm-jackson.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3222
A1 Jacobs,Neil
A1 Woodfield,Julie
A1 Morris,Anne
T1 Using local citation data to relate the use of journal articles by 
academic researchers to the coverage of full-text document access 
systems
JF J Doc
YR 2000
FD Sept.
VO 56
IS 5
SP 563
OP 581
AB Citation analysis -- Evaluation. Information systems -- Special 
subjects -- Serial publications. Information systems -- Great Britain. 
Use studies, British Library. Document Supply Centre.
NO BLIB00013842 Provider: OCLC; United Kingdom ISSN: 0022-0418 Details: 
bibl f diag. article feature article; ID: 466

RT Journal
ID 3223
A1 Jaguszewski,Janice M.
A1 Probst,Laura K.
T1 The Impact of Electronic Resources on Serial Cancellations and 
Remote Storage Decisions in Academic Research Libraries
JF Library Trends
YR 2000
VO 48
IS 4
SP 799
OP 820
AB In the past, serial cancellations and storage decisions focused 
primarily on print resources. With the addition of electronic 
resources, librarians in large research institutions must now manage an 
integrated collection consisting of both print and electronic formats. 
This article explores the impact that electronic resources have on such 
deaccession decisions. The authors identify criteria for these 
decisions and, within this framework, discuss the issues that arise 
because of the complex nature of electronic resources.
NO ID: 722

RT Journal
ID 3224
A1 Janes,Joseph
T1 Academic Reference: Playing to Our Strengths
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2004
VO 4
IS 4
SP 533
OP 536
AB "Readers in popular libraries need a great deal of assistance. 
...This is particularly needed by persons unused to handling books or 
conducting investigations." and "Reference work includes the direct, 
personal aid within a library to persons in search of information for 
whatever purpose, and also various library activities especially aimed 
at making information as easily available as possible." These two 
quotes, from two of the seminal forces in reference librarianship, 
encapsulate much of what is promising and troubling about the world of 
reference. The second was written at the end of the Second World War; 
the first was from over a century and a quarter ago. And yet, each in 
its own idiomatic way says things about reference work that we could 
easily say today: people do not know how to find stuff; therefore we 
help them in lots of ways. To be sure, many of those ways have changed, 
as have the people, the stuff, and us—but perhaps as many aspects of 
this world remain unchanged. And while there is mention in older 
literature of the fast pace of contemporary life to explain, for 
example, the motivation for telephone reference (such as this from 
Florence M. Gifford in 1943: "There are those to whom in these days of 
speed and lack of leisure, telephone service seems a legitimate demand 
from their taxpayers."), it is undeniable that the current rate of 
change in all important facets of reference work is unprecedented and 
accelerating.
NO ID: 693
UL 
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/v004/4.4j
anes.html

RT Journal
ID 3225
A1 Jansen,Bernard J.
A1 Spink,Amanda
A1 Saracevic,Tefko
T1 Real life, real users, and real needs: a study and analysis of user 
queries on the Web
JF Information Processing & Management
YR 2000
VO 36
IS 2
SP 207
OP 227
AB We analyzed transaction logs containing 51,473 queries posed by 
18,113 users of Excite, a major Internet search service. We provide 
data on: (i) sessions - changes in queries during a session, number of 
pages viewed, and use of relevance feedback, (ii) queries - the number 
of search terms, and the use of logic and modifiers, and (iii) terms - 
their rank/frequency distribution and the most highly used search 
terms. We then shift the focus of analysis from the query to the user 
to gain insight to the characteristic of the Web user. With these 
characteristics as a basis, we then conducted a failure analysis, 
identifying trends among user mistakes. We conclude with a summary of 
findings and a discussion of the implications of these finding.
NO ID: 521
UL http://jimjansen.tripod.com/academic/pubs/ipm98/ipm98.html

RT Journal
ID 3226
A1 Jatkevicius,James
T1 Biological sciences databases in academic libraries: comparing 
Cambridge Scientific Abstracts with BIOSIS
JF EContent
YR 2000
FD Feb./Mar.
VO 23
IS 1
SP 55
OP 59
K1 Descriptor: Biology -- Databases.
K1 Named Corp: Eli M. Oboler Library.
K1 Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, Inc.
K1 BioSciences Information Service
AB at Idaho State University. Biology -- Databases. Named Corp: Eli M. 
Oboler Library. Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, Inc. BioSciences 
Information Service.
NO BLIB00001855 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1525-2531 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 473

RT Journal
ID 3227
A1 Jeon-Slaughter,Haekyung
A1 Herkovic,Andrew C.
A1 Keller,Michael A.
T1 Economics of scientific and biomedical journals: Where do scholars 
stand in the debate of online journal pricing and site license 
ownership between libraries and publishers?
JF First Monday
YR 2005
VO 10
IS 3
AB The emergence of e–journals brought a great change in scholarly 
communication and in the behavior of scholars. However, the importance 
of scholars’ behavior in the pricing of scientific journal has been 
largely ignored in the recent debate between libraries and publishers 
over site license practices and pricing schemes. Stanford’s survey 
results indicate that sharply increasing costs are the main reason for 
individual subscription cancellation, driving users to rely on library 
or other institutional subscriptions. Libraries continue to be a vital 
information provider in the electronic era and their bargaining power 
in the market and the importance of roles in scholarly communication 
will be increased by branding and a strong relationship with users. 
Publishers’ strategy for thriving in the electronic era is not to lose 
personal subscribers. Cooperation among the three sectors — scholars, 
libraries, and publishers — promises optimal results for each sector 
more than ever.
NO ID: 620
UL http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue10_3/jeon/index.html

RT Journal
ID 3228
A1 Johns,Cecily
T1 Collection Management Strategies in a Digital Environment
JF Serials Librarian
YR 2003
VO 43
IS 3
SP 83
OP 87
AB This paper describes a grant-funded research project to relocate 
selected print journal runs, for which an electronic version is 
available, to remote storage from the shelves of campus libraries at 
the University of California. During the project, users will rely on 
the electronic version of selected journals. Data, including costs 
associated with the project, usage of print journals, usage of 
electronic journals, as well as user behavior and attitudes, will be 
gathered and used to develop long-range strategies and institutional 
policies.
NO ID: 542

RT Journal
ID 3229
A1 Johnson,William T.
T1 Environmental Impact: A Preliminary Citation Analysis of Local 
Faculty in a New Academic Program in Environmental and Human Health 
Applied to Collection Development at Texas Tech University Library
JF LIBRES: Library and Information Science Research Electronic Journal
YR 2002
VO 9
IS 1
AB New academic programs in environmental science prompted a citation 
analysis of local faculty by the Texas Tech University Library (TTU). 
The purpose of this study is to characterize the citation patterns of 
the interdisciplinary field of environmental and human health as 
compared with other disciplines and to apply the results to collection 
development. Twenty-four articles were selected from 1996 and 1997 with 
over 1600 citations to more than 950 listed references. The average age 
of citations was 10.5 years for journals and 9.4 years for books. On 
average, journals were cited 67% of the time while books were cited 17% 
of the time. Proceedings, theses, and technical reports were also cited 
but that data was not applied to collection development. The impact on 
collection development has been to identify a small number of specific 
books which were frequently cited but were not in the collection and to 
identify important subject terms with which to guide the selection of 
related books. Finally, 12 new subscriptions to frequently cited 
journals will be reviewed with faculty to determine their suitability 
as additions to the collection.
NO ID: 361
UL http://libres.curtin.edu.au/libre9n1/toxcite.htm

RT Journal
ID 3230
A1 Jones,Daniel
T1 Collection Development in the Digital Library
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1999
VO 17
IS 3/4
SP 27
OP 37
AB Collection development of electronic resources presents added 
dimensions to the traditional library collection development model for 
printed materials. The basic functions of collection development in the 
digital library remain the same as for the traditional STM library. 
Applying these functions to electronic resources at this time requires 
increased collaboration and a broadening of the skills and experience 
of collection development personnel. A primary objective of collection 
development is to give structure to a collection of resources by 
organizing them in a meaningful manner. New approaches are being used 
to define what the collection is.
NO ID: 820
UL 
http://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ6989
HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&ID=3365

RT Report
ID 3231
A1 Jones,Steve
T1 The Internet Goes to College: How Students are Living in the Future 
with Today's Technology
YR 2002
FD September 15
SP 1
OP 22
AB College students are early adopters and heavy users of the Internet. 
College students are heavy users of the Internet compared to the 
general population. Use of the Internet is a part of college students’ 
daily routine, in part because they have grown up with computers. It is 
integrated into their daily communication habits and has become a 
technology as ordinary as the telephone or television.
NO ID: 428
PP Washington, DC
T3 Tertiary The Internet Goes to College: How Students are Living in 
the Future with Today's Technology
UL http://www.pewinternet.org/reports/toc.asp?Report=71

RT Book, Section
ID 3232
A1 Jordan,Kelly M.
T1 The Penn State Engineering Library and Women in Engineering Program: 
A Partnership to Encourage the Retention of Women Engineering Students
YR 2002
SP 103
OP 110
NO ID: 689
T2 Making the grade : academic libraries and student success
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Chicago
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0838981771

RT Journal
ID 3233
A1 Julien,Heidi
A1 Duggan,Lawrence J.
T1 A longitudinal analysis of the information needs and uses literature
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2000
VO 22
IS 3
SP 291
OP 309
AB This investigation used content analysis to examine the information 
needs and uses literature published 1984–1989, and 1995–1998. 
Comparisons are made with similar analyses previously published for the 
period 1990–1994. Analyses measured degree of interdisciplinarity 
evident in references cited and identified subject areas cited, 
determined whether this literature was concerned with users' cognitive 
processes and with system design and use, and identified research 
methods used. Secondary analyses included journal type, author type, 
article type, whether the literature was grounded in theory, and user 
groups considered. This study extends results published previously, and 
demonstrates longitudinal development of research in this subfield of 
library and information science.
NO ID: 527

RT Book, Whole
ID 3234
A1 Kahin,Brian
A1 Varian,Hal R.
A1 Varian,Hal R.
T1 Internet publishing and beyond: the economics of digital information 
and intellectual property
YR 2000
SP 243
AB Speculative Microeconomics for Tomorrow's Economy / J. Bradford 
DeLong, A. Michael Froomkin 6 Advertising Pricing Models for the World 
Wide Web / Donna L. Hoffman, Thomas P. Novak 45 Profiting from Online 
News: The Search for Viable Business Models / Susan M. Mings, Peter B. 
White 62 Economics of Copy Protection in Software and Other Media / Oz 
Shy 97 Aggregation and Disaggregation of Information Goods: 
Implications for Bundling, Site Licensing, and Micropayment Systems / 
Yannis Bakos, Erik Brynjolfsson 114 Network Delivery of Information 
Goods: Optimal Pricing of Articles and Subscriptions / John Chung-I 
Chuang, Marvin A. Sirbu 138 Fixed-Fee versus Unit Pricing for 
Information Goods: Competition, Equilibria, and Price Wars / Peter C. 
Fishburn, Andrew M. Odlyzko, Ryan C. Siders 167 Versioning Information 
Goods / Hal R. Varian 190 Economics and Electronic Access to Scholarly 
Information / Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason, Juan F. Riveros 203
NO ID: 861
PB MIT PressKahin, Brian
PP Cambridge, MA
SN 0262611597
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0262611597

RT Journal
ID 3235
A1 Kane,Daniel
T1 Kennedy sees rising challenges for science journals
JF AAAS news release
YR 2004
AB The cover of the 14 May 2004 issue of Science looks more like a Miro 
painting than a battle between the immune cells of a mouse and yeast. 
In an austere Swiss Embassy room built of brick, wood and glass, 
Science Editor-in-Chief Donald Kennedy fans through the magazine's 
original research section and reads off names of countries. "U.S., 
Danish and German authors." He flips to the next paper. "Japanese 
authors." He goes on with the scientific world tour until he looks up 
and says: "Papers with strictly U.S. authors are a distinct minority."
NO ID: 789
UL http://www.aaas.org/news/releases/2004/0526kennedy.shtml

RT Journal
ID 3237
A1 Kari,Jarkko
A1 Savolainen,Reijo
T1 Conceptions of the Internet in everyday life information seeking
JF Journal of Information Science
JO J.Inf.Sci.
YR 2004
VO 30
IS 3
SP 219
OP 226
AB Based on the interviews of 18 people in Finland in 2001-2, 
conceptions of the Internet as an information source were explored. In 
general, the conceptions reflect the acceptability, accessibility and 
usability of Internet sources. Most conception appeared to be quite 
impressionistic, reflecting the basic difficulty of describing the 
constantly changing nature of the Internet. Two major kinds of Internet 
conceptions were identified. First, in metaphorical conceptions, the 
Internet was primarily conceived in terms of space or place, for 
example, a library or a bazaar. Second, conception based on actual use 
experiences of the Internet significantly drew on quality judgments of 
the networked services. Since a growing number of information sources 
of various types are competing for people's attention, general level 
conceptions of sources and channels will gain importance as a criterion 
by which sources will be accepted or rejected. This seems to be a 
particular characteristic of networked information environments.
NO ID: 679

RT Journal
ID 3236
A1 Kari,Jarkko
A1 Savolainen,Reijo
T1 Towards a contextual model of information seeking on the Web
JF New Review of Information Behaviour Research
YR 2003
VO 4
IS 1
SP 155
OP 175
AB This paper discusses everyday life information seeking via the World 
Wide Web, and its many contexts at various levels of abstraction. 
First, empirical Internet-searching studies are reviewed, the 
conclusion of which is the fact that they yield an exceedingly limited 
and fragmentary picture of the context of the activity. Therefore, the 
aim of the paper is theoretical: to propose - based on holistic 
reflection and earlier literature - a truly contextual model of Web 
searching from an individual's perspective. The various layers - life-
worlds, domains, situations, action, information action, information 
seeking, information sources, Internet and Web - of the framework are 
presented one by one, and the dynamics of the whole creation is 
eventually outlined. At the end, the usefulness and application of the 
model are deliberated upon. It is claimed that the framework amounts to 
an exhaustive description of the context of Web information seeking, 
and that the theoretical construct can be taken advantage of in 
researching information seeking from practically any source.
NO ID: 680

RT Book, Whole
ID 3238
A1 Karp,Rashelle S.
T1 Powerful Public Relations: A How-To Guide for Libraries
YR 2002
NO ID: 310
PB American Library Association
PP Chicago
SN 0-8389-0818-7

RT Book, Whole
ID 3239
A1 Karp,Rashelle S.
A1 Publications Committee of the Public Relations Section,Library 
Administration and Management Association
T1 Part-Time Public Relations with Full-Time Results: A PR Primer for 
Libraries
YR 1995
NO ID: 309
PB American Library Association
PP Chicago
SN 0-8389-0661-3

RT Journal
ID 3240
A1 Kassel,Amelia
T1 Practical Tips to Help You Prove Your Value
JF Marketing Library Services
YR 2002
VO 16
IS 4
SP 1
AB Information professionals in many settings have had to learn new 
skills and competencies not taught in graduate school, yet those skills 
are necessary for building productive relationships.
NO ID: 311
UL http://www.infotoday.com/mls/may02/kassel.htm

RT Journal
ID 3241
A1 Ke,Hao-Ren
A1 Kwakkelaar,Rolf
A1 Tai,Yu-Min
A1 Chen,Li-Chun
T1 Exploring behavior of E-journal users in science and technology: 
Transaction log analysis of Elsevier's ScienceDirect OnSite in Taiwan
JF library and information science research
YR 2002
VO 24
IS 3
SP 265
OP 291
AB In the era of digital libraries, Web-based electronic databases have 
become important resources for education and research, providing 
functionality and ease of use superior to print products. Analysis of 
usage of such online systems can provide valuable information on user 
behavior, and on usage of electronic information in general. 
Furthermore, the findings can be used to improve effectiveness of these 
electronic systems and identify areas for improvement, ranging from 
user interface and functionality to documentation and product training. 
This article analyzes usage of the Taiwan-based ScienceDirect OnSite E-
journal system, one of the largest and most heavily used full-text 
Science, Technology, and Medicine (STM) databases worldwide. [Copyright 
2002 Elsevier]
NO ID: 522

RT Journal
ID 3242
A1 Kelland,John Laurence
A1 Young,Arthur P.
T1 Citation as a form of library use
JF Collection Management
YR 1994
VO 19
IS 1/2
SP 81
OP 100
AB Review of the literature over the past 20 years. Citation analysis -
- Evaluation.
NO ID: 379

RT Book, Whole
ID 3243
A1 Kelly,Maurie Caitlin
A1 Kross,Andrea
T1 Making the grade: academic libraries and student success
YR 2002
SP 143
AB Chapters -- Library Mission Statements: Effective Tools for Change / 
Andrea Kross 1 Holistic Approach to Diversity: Practical Projects for 
Promoting Inclusivity / Arglenda Friday 17 Muses, Mindsets, and Models: 
How Technology is Shaping Library Services / Elizabeth A. Dupuis 37 
Chapter 4: Fishing For Success: Faculty/Librarian Collaboration Nets 
Effective Library Assignments / Caroline Gilson, Stephanie Michel 56 
Greatest Problem with which the Library is Confronted: A Survey of 
Academic Library Outreach to the Freshman Course / Cindy Pierard, 
Kathryn Graves 70 Role of the Library in Student Retention / Darla 
Rushing, Deborah Poole 89 Penn State Engineering Library and Women in 
Engineering Program: A Partnership to Encourage the Retention of Women 
Engineering Students / Kelly M. Jordan 100 Information Literacy (LIB 
150) at Fort Lewis College: Innovative Approaches to Instruction in a 
Required Course / Tina Evans
NO ID: 735
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Chicago
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0838981771

RT Journal
ID 3244
A1 Kelly,Robert A.
T1 The American Physical Society and the TORPEDO Ultra Project at the U 
S Naval Research Laboratory; presented at the 1999 NASIG Conference
JF The Serials Librarian
YR 2000
FD 2000article speech
VO 38
IS 1/2
SP 107
OP 111
K1 Descriptor: Periodicals, Physics.
K1 Electronic journals.
K1 SGML (Computer language).
K1 Scientific and technical libraries -- Serial publications.
K1 Scientific and technical libraries -- Washington (D.C.).
K1 Named Corp: Ruth H. Hooker Technical Library.
K1 American Physical Society.
K1 Genre/Form: Speech
NO ID: 283

RT Journal
ID 3245
A1 Kendall,Sandra Kendall
A1 Massarella,Susan
T1 Prescription for Successful Marketing
JF Computers in Libraries
YR 2001
VO 21
IS 8
SP 28
OP 32
AB Describes how a small hospital library increased their visibility 
using a small staff and a very limited budget. Creativity was required 
to publicize their resources to a diverse patronage.
NO ID: 312
UL http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/sep01/kendall&massarella.htm

RT Journal
ID 3246
A1 Kennedy,Lynn
A1 Cole,Charles
A1 Carter,Susan
T1 The false focus in online searching: the particular case of 
undergraduates seeking information for course assignments in the 
humanities and social sciences. as described in the information search 
process theory of Carol Kuhlthau
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 1999
FD Spring
VO 38
IS 3
SP 267
OP 273
K1 Descriptor: Information needs -- Evaluation.
K1 End-user searching.
K1 Cognition.
K1 Named Person: Kuhlthau, Carol Collier, 1937-
AB To avoid information overload, undergraduates seeking information 
for course assignments in the humanities and social sciences might skip 
the necessary stages of topic definition and elaboration, as Kuhlthau 
describes in her six-stage Information Search Process (ISP). This 
tendency can be reinforced by information professionals who seek to 
facilitate the users' searching of electronic databases with the 
suggestion that they limit their search so that the end result will be 
"manageable." This strategy can lead to a "false focus": a focus that 
is induced so that it comes too soon and is ultimately incompatible 
with the information need and interests of the user. We will examine 
the characteristics of false focus, and present a strategy that allows 
the reference librarian to identify the undergraduate's information 
need and automatically attach the most appropriate electronic database 
search strategy for the satisfaction of that need. Thus, the 
construction of a search strategy becomes wholly dependent on the 
user's information need, not the constraints posed by the accessing 
technology and the idea that the eventual output should be limited to 
thirty items or less.
NO BLIB99010516 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1094-9054 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 498

RT Book, Whole
ID 3247
A1 Kidger,Mark R.
A1 Pérez-Fournon,Ismael
A1 Sánchez,Francisco
A1 Pérez-Fournon,Ismael
A1 Sánchez,Francisco
T1 Internet resources for professional astronomy : proceedings of the 
IX Canary Islands Winter School of Astrophysics
YR 1999
AB Astronomy -- Computer network resources -- Congresses.
NO ID: 235
PB Cambridge University PresKidger, Mark R
PP New York, NY
SN 0521663083

RT Book, Whole
ID 3248
A1 Kies,Cosette N.
T1 Marketing and Public Relations for Libraries
YR 1987
AB A little dated, but this book provides a solid background to the 
subject.
NO ID: 313
PB Scarecrow Press
PP Metuchen, NJ
SN 0-8108-1925-2

RT Journal
ID 3249
A1 King,David L.
T1 Library home page design: A comparison of page layout for front-ends 
to ARL library web sites
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1998
IS September
SP 458
OP 465
AB Areas examined were - background, document headers, document 
footers, document body, page length, number of steps to library home 
page from parent institution web site, and domain name servers.
NO ID: 143

RT Journal
ID 3250
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Boyce,Peter B.
A1 Montgomery,Carol Hansen
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Library Economic Metrics: Examples of the Comparison of Electronic 
and Print Journal Collections and Collection Services
JF Library Trends
YR 2003
VO 51
IS 3
SP 376
OP 400
AB THIS ARTICLE DEALS WITH A FRAMEWORK of library economic metrics 
including service input and output, performance, usage, effectiveness, 
outcomes, impact, and cost and benefit comparisons. Examples of these 
measures are given for comparison of library electronic and print 
collections and collection services based on a recent cost finding 
study at Drexel University where the library has converted almost 
entirely to an electronic journal collection. These data are 
complemented with recent readership surveys of scientists at Drexel 
University, University of Tennessee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and 
members of the American Astronomical Society which describe changing 
information-seeking patterns and use of library electronic and print 
collections.
NO ID: 678

RT Book, Whole
ID 3251
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Jones,Heather
A1 Casto,Jane
T1 Communication by Engineers : A Literature Review of Engineers' 
Information Needs, Seeking Processes, and Use
YR 1994
K1 communication of technical information, bibliography, technology -- 
information services
NO ET: 1st; T10.5.K54 1994; ID: 163
PB Council on Library Resources, Inc
PP Washington, D.C.

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3254
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Scholarly journal and digital database pricing: threat or 
opportunity?
YR 2000
FD March 23, 2000
AB For over 3.5 centuries, scientific scholarly journals have 
demonstrated remarkable stability. Over the past few decades a large 
number of studies have shown their continued use, usefulness and value. 
However, two phenomena have evolved over the past three decades that 
have the potential of either destroying the system or substantially 
enhancing its considerable usefulness and value. These two phenomena 
are the maturation of communication technologies and the economics of 
the journal system; particularly pricing of traditional journal 
subscriptions and access to digital full-text databases. Certainly, the 
new technologies should, if deployed with care, enhance the journal 
system; but the greatest threat to the system appears to be pricing 
policies that have substantially reduced personal subscriptions, 
increased reliance on library access, raised library prices far higher 
than inflation or increased journal sizes would warrant, and caused 
libraries and scientists to rely more heavily on obtaining separate 
copies of articles through interlibrary loan, document delivery, 
preprints, reprints and photocopies or electronic copies from authors 
and colleagues. This paper provides some insights gained from analysis 
of over 13,500 responses from readership surveys of scientists; cost 
analysis of publishing, library services and scientists' communication 
patterns; tracking of a sample of scholarly journals from 1960 to 1995; 
and review of over 600 publications dealing with scientific scholarly 
journals. This paper will attempt to dispel some myths concerning 
communication costs, system participants' incentives, and reasons for 
increased prices. It will also present perspectives on pricing that 
might help in an electronic age and some suggestions concerning 
subscription pricing, site licensing, and online access to separate 
copies of articles.
NO ID: 200
T2 Economics and Usage of Digital Library Collections - Conference
PP Ann Arbor, MI
UL http://www.si.umich.edu/PEAK-2000/king.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3255
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 The Cost and Price Dilemma of Scholarly Journals
JF Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting
YR 2000
VO 37
SP 63
OP 66
K1 Costs
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Scientific and Technical Information
K1 Price
K1 Change
K1 Futures (of Society)
K1 Publishing Industry
AB Examines overall costs of the scientific scholarly journal system 
and finds that relative system costs have not increased since the late 
1970s. Describes scholarly publishing costs; factors that have 
contributed to spiraling price increases and changes in journal 
subscription demand; and alternative pricing policies that might help 
in the future. (Contains 7 references.) (Author/LRW)
NO EJ618401; 0160-0044(2000)372.0.TX;2-F Paper presented at the Annual 
Meeting of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS) (63rd, 
Chicago, IL, November 12-16, 2000). English 0160-0044 2000 63 2000 
Journal Article (CIJE) a IR543082 CIJJUN2001 080 Journal Articles 141 
Reports--Descriptive; ID: 407

RT Book, Section
ID 3253
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Using and reading scholarly literature
YR 1999
VO 34; 34
SP 423
OP 477
NO ID: 643
T2 Annual Review of Information Science and Technology
PB Information Today, Inc
PP Medford, NJ

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3252
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Economic Cost Models of Scientific Scholarly Journals
YR 1998
AB This paper summarizes costs of publishing scientific scholarly 
journals. Activities are described for five publishing components: 
article processing (e.g., manuscript processing, editing, composition, 
etc.), non-article processing (i.e., similar activities related to 
covers, tables-of-content, letters, book reviews, etc.), reproduction 
(e.g., printing, collating, binding, etc.), distribution (e.g., 
wrapping, labeling, sorting, mailing, subscription maintenance, etc.), 
and support (e.g., marketing, administration, finance, etc.). A model 
is derived for each of these components consisting of cost parameters 
(e.g., number of issues, pages, subscriptions, etc.) and cost elements 
(e.g., cost per page of editing, set-up cost per issue, postage cost 
per issue copy mailed, etc.). Total costs of a "typical" journal are 
presented where cost parameters are estimated from a sample of 
scientific scholarly journals and cost elements derived from estimates 
reported in the literature. Costs of electronic publications are also 
derived.
NO ID: 729
T2 Proceedings of ICSU Press Workshop on Economics, real costs and 
benefits of electronic publishing in science - a technical study
PP Keble College, University of Oxford UK
UL http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/icsu/kingppr.htm

RT Journal
ID 3256
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 Montgomery,Carol Hansen
A1 Aerni,Sarah E.
T1 Patterns of Journal Use by Faculty at Three Diverse Universities
JF D-Lib Magazine
YR 2003
VO 9
IS 10
AB University libraries are rapidly moving toward electronic journal 
collections. Readership surveys at three universities with different 
levels of electronic journal implementation demonstrate how transition 
to electronic journal collections affects use patterns of faculty and 
staff. The University of Tennessee was in a transitional phase when the 
survey was done (2000), the University of Pittsburgh had acquired a 
large electronic journal collection, but with some duplication with 
print journals (2003), and Drexel University had migrated to nearly all 
electronic journals (2002). Although faculty use of personal print 
subscriptions remains significant, electronic personal subscriptions 
are used only infrequently by faculty even though this is an option 
available to them. On the other hand, electronic journal use is very 
high when available in library collections. Twenty-five year trends of 
reading by university scientists show substantial increases in average 
amount of reading with nearly all of this increase coming from library 
collections. The likely increase in reading from library collections is 
due in part to a decline in personal subscriptions and increased online 
bibliographic searching coupled with increased availability of the 
library collections and, recently, enlarged electronic journal 
collections. Scientists appear to be more advanced in their use of 
electronic journals than other faculty, but changes are taking place 
within all faculty disciplines.
NO ID: 676
UL http://www.dlib.org/dlib/october03/king/10king.html

RT Journal
ID 3257
A1 Kingsley,Paul
A1 Anderson,Terry
T1 Facing life without the Internet
JF Internet Research: Electronic Networking Applications and Policy
JO Internet Res.: Electron.Networking Appl.Policy
YR 1998
VO 8
IS 4
SP 303
OP 312
AB They carried out exploratory research to figure out why some people 
defect from internet and/or leave the internet altogether. They look at 
issues such as: information rich and information poor.
NO ID: 158

RT Newspaper Article
ID 3258
A1 Kirkpatrick,David D.
T1 As publishers perish, libraries feel the pain
JF New York Times
YR 2000
FD November 3
SP 1
K1 Suzanne Fedunok
NO ID: 227
T2 New York Times
PP New York, NY

RT Book, Section
ID 3259
A1 Kling,Rob
T1 The Internet and Unrefereed Scholarly Publishing
YR 2004
VO 38; 38
SP 591
OP 631
AB Introduction -- In the early 1990s, much of the enthusiasm for the 
use of electronic media to enhance scholarly communication focused on 
electronic journals, especially electronic-only (pure) e-journals1 (see 
for example, Peek and Newby's (1996) anthology). Much of the systematic 
research about the use of electronic media to enhance scholarly 
communication also focused on electronic journals. However, by the late 
1990s, numerous scientific publishers transformed their paper journals 
(p-journals) into paper and electronic journals (p-e journals) and sold 
them via subscription models that did not provide the significant costs 
savings, speed of access and breadth of audience that pure e-journal 
advocates had expected (Okerson, 1996). In 2001, some senior life 
scientists led a campaign to have publishers make online access to 
their journals freely available after six months (Russo, 2001). The 
campaign leaders, using the name "Public Library of Science" asked 
scientists to boycott journals that did not comply with their demands 
for open access to online articles after six months. While the proposal 
was discussed in scientific magazines and conferences, it did not seem 
to influence any journal publishers to comply (Young, 2002). Most 
productive scientists, who work for major universities and research 
institutes that have adequate to excellent scientific journal 
collections would have little incentive to boycott top journals. Some 
of the major improvements in the speed and openness of scholarly 
communication via the Internet are most likely to come from outside of 
the peer-reviewed journal system. In this chapter, the term “unrefereed 
manuscript” refers to a manuscript that has not yet been accepted for 
publication through peer review2. The “unrefereed manuscript” may not 
have yet been submitted to a peer reviewed venue, may be under review 
at a peer reviewed venue, or may have been rejected from one peer 
reviewed venue and has not yet been accepted for another peer-reviewed 
venue. Some enthusiasts for using electronic media such as Internet 
forums to enhance scholarly communication, emphasized the value of 
scholars' exchanging research manuscripts prior to their being accepted 
for publication in peer reviewed venues, such as journals or 
conferences (Harnad, 1999; Halpern, 2000).
NO ID: 734
A2 Cronin,Blaise
T2 Annual review of information science and technology
PB Information Today
PP Medford, NJ
UL http://www.slis.indiana.edu/CSI/WP/WP03-01B.html

RT Journal
ID 3260
A1 Kling,Rob
A1 McKim,Geoffrey
T1 Not just a matter of time: Field differences and the shaping of 
electronic media in supporting scientific communication
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 14
SP 1306
OP 1320
AB The shift towards the use of electronic media in scholarly 
communication appears to be an inescapable imperative. However, these 
shifts are uneven, both with respect to field and with respect to the 
form of communication. Different scientific fields have developed and 
use distinctly different communicative forums, both in the paper and 
electronic arenas, and these forums play different communicative roles 
within the field. One common claim is that we are in the early stages 
of an electronic revolution, that it is only a matter of time before 
other fields catch up with the early adopters, and that all fields 
converge on a stable set of electronic forums. A social shaping of 
technology (SST) perspective helps us to identify important social 
forces - centered around disciplinary constructions of trust and of 
legitimate communication - that pull against convergence. This analysis 
concludes that communicative plurality and communicative heterogeneity 
are durable features of the scholarly landscape, and that we are likely 
to see field differences in the use of and meaning ascribed to 
communications forums persist, even as overall use of electronic 
communications technologies both in science and in society as a whole 
increases.
NO ID: 210
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/75000719/START

RT Journal
ID 3261
A1 Kling,Rob
A1 Spector,Lisa B.
A1 Fortuna,Joanna
T1 The real stakes of virtual publishing: The transformation of E-
Biomed into PubMed central
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 2
SP 127
OP 148
AB In May 1999, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Harold 
Varmus proposed an electronic repository for biomedical research 
literature server called E-biomed. E-biomed reflected the visions of 
scholarly electronic publishing advocates: It would be fully 
searchable, be free to readers, and contain full-text versions of both 
preprint and postpublication biomedical research articles. However, 
within 4 months, the E-biomed proposal was radically transformed: The 
preprint section was eliminated, delays were instituted between article 
publication and posting to the archive, and the name was changed to 
PubMed Central. This case study examines the remarkable transformation 
of the E-biomed proposal to PubMed Central by analyzing comments about 
the proposal that were posted to an online E-biomed forum created by 
the NIH, and discussions that took place in other face-to-face forums 
where E-biomed deliberations took place. We find that the 
transformation of the E-biomed proposal into PubMed Central was the 
result of highly visible and highly influential position statements 
made by scientific societies against the proposal. The literature about 
scholarly electronic publishing usually emphasizes a binary conflict 
between (trade) publishers and scholars/scientists. We conclude that: 
(1) scientific societies and the individual scientists they represent 
do not always have identical interests in regard to scientific e-
publishing; (2) stakeholder politics and personal interests reign 
supreme in e-publishing debates, even in a supposedly status-free 
online forum; and (3) multiple communication forums must be considered 
in examinations of e-publishing deliberations.
NO ID: 659
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106563225/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3263
A1 Koehler,Wallace
T1 Web Page Change and Persistence-A Four-Year Longitudinal Study
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
FD Jan 15
VO 53
IS 2
SP 162
OP 171
K1 World Wide Web
K1 Change Analysis
K1 Web Pages
K1 Longitudinal Studies
K1 Measurement Techniques
AB Discussion of changes in the topography of the Web focuses on 
changes to an existing set of Web documents over a four-year period. 
Highlights include the life cycle of Web objects; changes to Web 
objects; measures of change; Web page demise; and Web page changes, 
including hypertext links, content change, and structural change. (LRW)
NO EJ643519; 3318-3324(20020115)53:22.0.TX;2-U Special issue on Web 
Research. English 3318-3324 Jan 15, 2002 162 20020115 Journal Article 
(CIJE) a IR545641 CIJAUG2002 080 Journal Articles 143 Reports--
Research; ID: 385

RT Journal
ID 3262
A1 Koehler,Wallace
T1 An Analysis of Web Page and Web Site Constancy and Permanence
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1999
FD Feb
VO 50
IS 2
SP 162
OP 180
K1 Electronic Publishing
K1 World Wide Web
K1 Web Sites
K1 Change
K1 Computer System Design
K1 Information Dissemination
K1 Information Networks
K1 Information Retrieval
K1 Information Sources
K1 Internet
K1 Models
K1 Publishing Industry
AB Explores Web page and Web site mortality rates, and considers two 
types of change: content and structural. Examines those constancy and 
permanence phenomena for different Web document classes. Suggests that, 
from the perspective of information maintenance and retrieval, the Web 
does not represent revolutionary change, that in some ways it is less 
sophisticated than traditional publication practices. Contains 42 
references. (Author/AEF)
NO EJ595474; 0002-8231(199902)50:22.0.TX;2-B English 0002-8231 Feb 1999 
162 199902 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR540799 CIJMAY2000 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 386

RT Journal
ID 3264
A1 Kohl,David F.
T1 To Select or Not Select: Taking off the Blinders in Collection 
Development
JF Collection Management
YR 2001
VO 26
IS 2
SP 1
OP 12
AB The conclusion of the article is that expanding access provides 
greater benefit to users than careful title-by-title selection. This is 
an analysis of OhioLINK electronic journal usage.
NO ID: 354

RT Journal
ID 3265
A1 Koontz,Christie
T1 Stores and Libraries: Both Serve Customers!
JF Marketing Library Services
YR 2002
VO 16
IS 1
SP 3
AB Both stores and libraries want to maximize consumer satisfaction. 
"This article will examine retail marketing concepts that can translate 
successfully into the library environment, and will discuss retail 
practices that libraries can adopt (with very little expense) to 
achieve a lot of customer satisfaction."
NO ID: 314
UL http://www.infotoday.com/mls/jan02/koontz.htm

RT Journal
ID 3266
A1 Korth,Henry F.
A1 Silberschatz,Abraham
T1 Database research faces the information explosion
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 24 pages.
SP 139
OP 142
K1 Data bases
K1 Information management
K1 Technological change
K1 Applications
K1 Future
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (8302) Software & computer services industry
AB Today's exploding information volume and breadth of information 
dissemination are phenomena with historical precedents and show that 
the societal effects of a new information age could lead to periods of 
dramatic scientific discovery and cultural change. In the field of 
computer science, the subfield of database systems is devoted to the 
study of the problems of managing large volumes of data. From its roots 
in commercial data processing, database system research has developed 
into one of the great success stories of computer science - in terms of 
significant theoretical results and in terms of significant commercial 
value. Increasingly, databases will need to deal with inherently 
imperfect and incomplete data. The challenge facing database 
researchers and practitioners is to preserve existing strengths of 
database systems as they evolve into systems increasingly similar in 
organization to such human-run services as libraries, agents, brokers, 
and the like.
NO ID: 110

RT Journal
ID 3267
A1 Kovacs,Beatrice
T1 The impact of weeding on collection development: sci-tech 
collections vs. general collections
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1989
VO 9
IS 3
SP 25
OP 36
AB What impact does the removal of materials have on the decision-
making for collection development? Is there a difference between 
weeding science and technology collections versus general collections? 
The answers appears to be no.
NO ID: 712

RT Journal
ID 3268
A1 Kracker,Jacqueline
T1 Research Anxiety and Students' Perceptions of Research: An 
Experiment. Part I. Effect of Teaching Kuhlthau's ISP Model
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
FD Feb
VO 53
IS 4
SP 282
OP 294
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Research Papers (Students)
K1 Student Attitudes
K1 Student Research
K1 Kuhlthau Model
K1 Higher Education
K1 Hypothesis Testing
K1 Measures (Individuals)
K1 Pretests Posttests
K1 Statistical Analysis
K1 Undergraduate Students
AB Investigates the effect of a 30-minute presentation of Carol 
Kuhlthau's Information Search Process (ISP) model on undergraduate 
students' perceptions of research and research paper anxiety, focusing 
on results of the quantitative analysis. Highlights include pretests 
and posttest results; and data analysis and hypothesis testing.
NO EJ647580; 3318-3324(200202)53:42.0.TX;2-5 For Part II, see IR 545 
982. English 3318-3324 Feb 2002 282 200202 Journal Article (CIJE) a 
IR545981 CIJOCT2002 080 Journal Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 388

RT Journal
ID 3269
A1 Kracker,Jacqueline
A1 Wang,Peiling
T1 Research Anxiety and Students' Perceptions of Research: An 
Experiment. Part II. Content Analysis of Their Writings on Two 
Experiences
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
FD Feb
VO 53
IS 4
SP 295
OP 307
K1 Content Analysis
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Research Papers (Students)
K1 Student Attitudes
K1 Student Research
K1 Writing (Composition)
K1 Kuhlthau Model
K1 Critical Incidents Method
K1 Higher Education
K1 Qualitative Research
AB Reports qualitative results of a study of undergraduates that 
investigated the effect of a 30-minute presentation of Carol Kuhlthau's 
Information Search Process (ISP) model on undergraduate students' 
perceptions of research and research paper anxiety. Describes content 
analysis based on Critical Incident Technique that examined student 
writings on research paper experiences.
NO EJ647581; 3318-3324(200202)53:42.0.TX;2-# For Part I, see IR 545 
981. English 3318-3324 Feb 2002 295 200202 Journal Article (CIJE) a 
IR545982 CIJOCT2002 080 Journal Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 389

RT Journal
ID 3270
A1 Kratz,Charles
T1 Transforming the delivery of service: The joint-use library and 
information commons
JF College & Research Libraries News
YR 2003
VO 64
IS 2
SP X
AB The new realities that are facing academic libraries today are 
challenging the profession to rethink service roles and define new 
models of service delivery. This reevaluation of roles provides 
opportunities for cultivating new relationships on our campuses and in 
our communities. In these times of libraries being marginalized in the 
digital age, it becomes most critical to maintain the importance and 
relevance of academic libraries as places of intellectual life and 
centers of activity. Two service models, “joint-use libraries” and 
“information commons” offer academic libraries unique, attractive 
service delivery options to help libraries rethink the library as a 
place for different types of learning and collaboration.
NO ID: 766
UL 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crlnews/backissues2003/february1/t
ransforming.htm

RT Journal
ID 3272
A1 Kraus,Joseph
T1 Comparing Journal Use Between Biology Faculty and Undergraduate 
Students
JF Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship
YR 2005
FD Summer
IS 43
AB From 1997 through 2002, the faculty in the Biological Sciences 
Department at the University of Denver wrote 90 articles that were 
indexed by Thomson/ISI's Science Citation Index. Using data from this 
database, a list of the sources cited by the faculty was prepared. 
There were a total of 3,942 citations, and most of those citations were 
to journal articles. The top cited journal list was compared to a list 
of journals our biology students used. Many of the journals in the top 
20 were co-listed, but for less cited journals, the faculty used many 
other journals for their research.
NO ID: 866
UL http://www.istl.org/05-summer/article2.html

RT Journal
ID 3271
A1 Kraus,Joseph
T1 Developments and updates to the Sci-Tech Website. Web site of the 
SLA Science-Technology Division
JF Sci-Tech News
YR 2000
VO 54
IS 1
SP 10
OP 11
NO ID: 198

RT Journal
ID 3274
A1 Kraus,Joseph R.
T1 Citation Patterns of Advanced Undergraduate Students in Biology, 
2000-2002
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2002
VO 22
IS 3/4
SP 161
OP 179
AB SUMMARY. Thirty-three undergraduate student papers in biology that 
were presented at an annual symposium of undergraduate research at the 
University of Denver from 2000 through 2002 were evaluated. There were 
a total of 770 citations with an average of 23.3 citations per paper. 
It was determined that 76.2% of the citations came from journal 
articles, 16.4% came from books or book chapters, 6.4% were to other 
miscellaneous sources, and only 1.0% were to Web sites. Other findings 
include the top cited journals, the oldest cited journal articles, the 
average age and range of books and journals, the types of miscellaneous 
sources cited, and the stability of the cited Web sites.
NO ID: 827

RT Report
ID 3273
A1 Kraus,Joseph R.
T1 Collection Development for Science Libraries
YR 1994
FD December 12, 1994
SP 1
OP 14
AB Paper for my LBSC 756 class at the University of Maryland.
NO ID: 266
PP Laurel, MD
T3 Tertiary Collection Development for Science Libraries

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3275
A1 Kraus,Joseph R.
A1 Fisher,Patricia
T1 Citation Analysis of Undergraduate Biology Department Honors Papers 
at the Univeristy of Denver
YR 2000
FD July 10, 2000 ?
AB The librarians at the University of Denver have been interested in 
gathering usage statistics of the libraries collections for many years. 
We have undertaken this research to see how use of the library has 
changed over the last several years. We were particularly interested in 
seeing if students were citing Internet resources, or if they were 
solely using traditional book and journal resources. We wanted to see 
if students were using more journal sources now that the library has so 
many electronic index - abstract - full text databases. We were also 
interested in seeing if students were using more recent materials than 
in previous years.
NO ID: 197
T2 ALA Conference
PB ALA
PP Chicago
UL http://www.du.edu/~jokraus/ALA2000/biocites.html

RT Journal
ID 3276
A1 Krikelas,James
T1 Information Seeking Behavior, Patterns and Concepts
JF Drexel Library Quarterly
YR 1983
VO 19
IS 2 (Spring)
SP 5
OP 20
K1 information needs, citation studies, gather, gathering, giving
NO ID: 131

RT Journal
ID 3277
A1 Kristick,Laurel
T1 Physics: an annotated list of key resources on the Internet
JF College and Research Libraries News
YR 2000
VO 61
IS 3 (March)
SP 199
OP 202
AB Physicists have been using the Internet since its earliest days. The 
Department of Energy’s high-energy physicists created HEPnet, developed 
in the 1970s along with other specialized nets. This group also helped 
develop the foundation of the World Wide Web in 1989. A physics 
laboratory (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) was the first U. S. Web 
site.
NO ID: 255
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/resmar00.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 3279
A1 Kuhlthau,Carol Collier
T1 Seeking Meaning: A Process Approach to Library and Information 
Services
YR 2004
SP 247
AB Introduction Ch. 1 The Constructive Process in Library and 
Information Science Theory 1 Ch. 2 Learning As a Process 13 Ch. 3 The 
Information Search Process 29 Ch. 4 Verification of the Model of the 
Information Search Process 53 Ch. 5 Longitudinal Confirmation of the 
Information Search Process 71 Ch. 6 Uncertainty Principle 89 Ch. 7 
Roles of Mediators in the Process of Information Seeking 107 Ch. 8 
Zones of Intervention in the Process of Information Seeking 127 Ch. 9 
Implementing the Process Approach 145 Ch. 10 Information Search Process 
in the Workplace 165 Ch. 11 Process-Oriented Library and Information 
Services 189
NO ID: 826
PB Libraries Unlimited
PP Westport, CT
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1591580943

RT Journal
ID 3278
A1 Kuhlthau,Carol Collier
T1 The role of experience in the information search process of an early 
career information worker: Perceptions of uncertainty, complexity, 
construction, and sources
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 1999
VO 50
IS 5
SP 399
OP 412
AB Information workers center on seeking, gathering, and interpreting 
information in order to provide value-added information as a basis for 
making decisions and judgments critical to the function of an 
enterprise. This longitudinal case study investigates changes in 
perceptions of the information search process of an early career 
information worker as he becomes more experienced and proficient at his 
work. Building on Kuhlthau's earlier research, comparisons of the 
user's perceptions of uncertainty, complexity, construction, and 
sources in information tasks were made over a 5-year period. This is a 
case study, but it provides insight into issues raised in prior 
quantitative studies of securities analysts.
NO ID: 845
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/55002182/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3280
A1 Kuhlthau,Carol Collier
A1 McNally,Mary Jane
T1 The Information Search Process in Science Education
JF Reference Librarian
YR 1994
IS 44
SP 53
OP 60
AB Still have to read from the microfilm.
NO ID: 847

RT Journal
ID 3281
A1 Kuhlthau,Carol Collier
A1 Vakkari,Pertti
T1 Information Seeking in Context (ISIC)
JF Information Processing and Management
YR 1999
VO 35
IS 6
SP 723
OP 725
AB The theme of this issue is Information Seeking In Context. Context, 
as an essential component for understanding information seeking 
behavior, is receiving increased attention by researchers in 
information seeking and use. Heightened interest in context may be a 
reaction to the limitation of the objectivist view of meeting 
information needs by query matching within a system perspective. 
Research into context highlights a user-centered approach to the study 
of information seeking and use that emphasizes real users with actual 
information needs prompted by situations arising in daily living. 
Information Seeking in Context (ISIC) has been the theme of a series of 
international research conferences, one held in Finland at the 
University of Tampere in August of 1996 and another in the England at 
the University of Sheeld in August of 1998, with a third planned for 
August 2000 at the University of Gothenberg in Sweden.
NO ID: 846
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4573(99)00022-9

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3282
A1 Kurtz,Michael J.
T1 Restrictive access policies cut readership of electronic research 
journal articles by a factor of two
YR 2004
FD February 19
AB By using the access logs of the NASA Astrophysics Data System 
Digital Library, it is possible to evaluate how the different access 
policies of different journals and publishers effect the reading 
behavior of working researchers. Compared to those journals with the 
easiest access the access control policies of the most restrictive 
journals prevent about as many article reads as they allow. The 
conference website is at http://opcit.eprints.org/feb19oa/.
NO ID: 621
T2 National Policies on Open Access (OA) Provision for University 
Research Output: an International meeting
PP New College, Southampton University
UL http://opcit.eprints.org/feb19oa/kurtz.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3284
A1 Kurtz,Michael J.
A1 Eichhorn,Guenther
A1 Accomazzi,Alberto
A1 Grant,Carolyn S.
A1 Demleitner,Markus
A1 Murray,Stephen S.
T1 Worldwide Use and Impact of the NASA Astrophysics Data System 
Digital Library
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2005
VO 56
IS 1
SP 36
OP 45
AB The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), along with astronomy's 
journals and data centers (a collaboration dubbed URANIA), has 
developed a distributed on-line digital library which has become the 
dominant means by which astronomers search, access and read their 
technical literature. Digital libraries permit the easy accumulation of 
a new type of bibliometric measure, the number of electronic accesses 
(``reads'') of individual articles. By combining data from the text, 
citation, and reference databases with data from the ADS readership 
logs we have been able to create Second Order Bibliometric Operators, a 
customizable class of collaborative filters which permits substantially 
improved accuracy in literature queries. Using the ADS usage logs along 
with membership statistics from the International Astronomical Union 
and data on the population and gross domestic product (GDP) we develop 
an accurate model for world-wide basic research where the number of 
scientists in a country is proportional to the GDP of that country, and 
the amount of basic research done by a country is proportional to the 
number of scientists in that country times that country's per capita 
GDP. We introduce the concept of utility time to measure the impact of 
the ADS/URANIA and the electronic astronomical library on astronomical 
research. We find that in 2002 it amounted to the equivalent of 736 FTE 
researchers, or $250 Million, or the astronomical research done in 
France.
NO ID: 623
UL http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/~kurtz/jasist1-abstract.html

RT Journal
ID 3283
A1 Kurtz,Michael J.
A1 Eichhorn,Guenther
A1 Accomazzi,Alberto
A1 Grant,Carolyn S.
A1 Demleitner,Markus
A1 Murray,Stephen S.
T1 The NASA ADS Abstract Service and the Distributed Astronomy Digital 
Library
JF D-Lib Magazine
YR 1999
VO 5
IS 11
AB Astronomy has a fully functional digital library. A majority of 
working astronomers use it almost daily, and substantially more 
articles per month are read through it than in the sum of all the 
traditional print libraries worldwide. This has come about by the close 
collaboration of the major journals, the Strasbourg Data Center (CDS) 
and several other data centers, and the NASA Astrophysics Data System 
Abstract Service (ADS). This collaboration, which Peter Boyce (Boyce 
1996) called Urania (after the muse of Astronomy), has fully 
revolutionized the way astronomers use the literature and can serve as 
an example for other disciplines. This article describes the central 
role that the ADS has played, and plays, in developing and enabling 
this revolution, as well as some of the technical details which have 
helped the system to work.
NO ID: 696
UL http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november99/11kurtz.html

RT Journal
ID 3285
A1 Kurtz,Michael J.
A1 Eichhorn,Guenther
A1 Accomazzi,Alberto
A1 Grant,Carolyn S.
A1 Demleitner,Markus
A1 Murray,Stephen S.
A1 Martimbeau,Nathalie
A1 Elwell,Barbara
T1 The Bibliometric Properties of Article Readership Information
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2005
VO 56
IS 2
SP 111
OP 128
AB The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), along with astronomy's 
journals and data centers (a collaboration dubbed URANIA), has 
developed a distributed on-line digital library which has become the 
dominant means by which astronomers search, access and read their 
technical literature. Digital libraries such as the NASA Astrophysics 
Data System \citep{2004JASIS........2K} permit the easy accumulation of 
a new type of bibliometric measure, the number of electronic accesses 
(``reads'') of individual articles. We explore various aspects of this 
new measure. We examine the obsolescence function as measured by actual 
reads, and show that it can be well fit by the sum of four exponentials 
with very different time constants. We compare the obsolescence 
function as measured by readership with the obsolescence function as 
measured by citations. We find that the citation function is 
proportional to the sum of two of the components of the readership 
function. This proves that the normative theory of citation is true in 
the mean. We further examine in detail the similarities and differences 
between the citation rate, the readership rate and the total citations 
for individual articles, and discuss some of the causes. Using the 
number of reads as a bibliometric measure for individuals, we introduce 
the read-cite diagram to provide a two-dimensional view of an 
individual's scientific productivity. We develop a simple model to 
account for an individual's reads and cites and use it to show that the 
position of a person in the read-cite diagram is a function of age, 
innate productivity, and work history. We show the age biases of both 
reads and cites, and develop two new bibliometric measures which have 
substantially less age bias than citations: SumProd, a weighted sum of 
total citations and the readership rate, intended to show the total 
productivity of an individual; and Read10, the readership rate for 
papers published in the last ten years, intended to show an 
individual's current productivity. We also discuss the effect of 
normalization (dividing by the number of authors on a paper) on these 
statistics. We apply SumProd and Read10 using new, non-parametric 
techniques to rank and compare different astronomical research 
organizations
NO ID: 624
UL http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/~kurtz/jasist2-abstract.html

RT Journal
ID 3286
A1 Kwasitsu,Lishi
T1 Information-seeking behavior of design, process, and manufacturing 
engineers
JF Library & information science research
YR 2003
VO 25
IS 4
SP 459
OP 476
AB This article discusses the information sources used by design, 
process, and manufacturing engineers in an international microchip 
manufacturing company, and the characteristics that influence their 
information source selection and use. Findings differ from previous 
research in three ways. First, there was a significant difference in 
these engineers' information behavior. Second, the higher the 
engineers' level of education, the less likely they were to depend on 
their personal memories as sources of information, and the more likely 
they were to rely on libraries. Third, the higher the level of 
engineers' education, the less likely they were to consider 'personal 
mastery' (information tool mastery) as a source influencer. This 
article explores disciplinary differences in academic Web-site 
interlinking using the university departments of chemistry, psychology, 
and history. Research has suggested that Web-link counts are related to 
research productivity and geographic distance between source and 
target, but no previous Webometric studies have comparatively analyzed 
academic departments from different disciplines. This study shows large 
differences in Web use by discipline for both Web-site size and the 
extent of interlinking, with the history department making little use 
of the Web and the chemistry department the most. There are significant 
correlations between in-links and research impact for the psychology 
and chemistry departments, with a stronger association for the 
psychology department. There was little evidence, however, of a 
geographic trend in interlinking.
NO ID: 867
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0740-8188(03)00054-9

RT Journal
ID 3287
A1 Landsman,Margaret
T1 Price Increases Are Not the Problem
JF Charleston Advisor
YR 2004
VO 5
IS 3
AB It is troubling that so much of the discussion about scholarly 
communication focuses on journal price increases. A listening bystander 
might suppose that if prices stopped rising, libraries would have no 
further worries and could afford the collections users need. But we 
know that the issue is not merely what we used to call “inflation” and 
now more accurately label “price increases.” It’s not just about the 
price increases––it’s about the price. On the other hand, advocates of 
Open Access publishing and archiving in their many combinations and 
permutations sometimes seem to be saying that libraries will never need 
to pay anybody for anything anymore. Which seems unlikely. There needs 
to be a place in the middle where common sense might reign. Not 
everything we need can be free––but some of it can. And when we buy 
journals which cost a lot, we should be able to expect that “a lot” 
translates into a figure that is not the same thing as “perfectly 
outrageous.” To move in the general direction of such a state, 
libraries must help new publishing initiatives to establish themselves. 
But our current procedures often result in decisions that push us in 
the opposite direction, towards funding expansion of the title lists of 
expensive publishers while denying smaller lower-priced initiatives the 
ability to grow. Because it is difficult to deal at once with all the 
aspects of a complicated problem, we tend to simplify and make 
decisions based on the pieces of a problem we can most easily see––the 
ones that are easiest to grab onto. In the case of journal budgets, 
this is the percentage annual increase. If we base our judgments on 
this figure alone, our decisions may be skewed in disastrous 
directions.
NO ID: 774
UL http://www.charlestonco.com/features.cfm?id=149&type=ed

RT Journal
ID 3288
A1 Lang,Brian
T1 Bricks and Bytes: Libraries in Flux
JF Daedalus
JO Daedalus
YR 1996
VO 125
IS 4
SP 221
AB The late 20th century presented public libraries with new 
information technologies that have made them confused about their new 
roles. Libraries must learn to combine their traditional role as a 
repository of data with new functions, such as innovation and cultural 
stimulus.
NO ID: 350

RT Journal
ID 3289
A1 Lanham,Allen
A1 Slough,Marlene
T1 Eastern Illinois University: Invests in the Past and Future of Its 
Library
JF ILA Reporter
YR 2003
FD June
AB Booth Library renovation. 30 months.
NO ID: 754

RT Journal
ID 3290
A1 Lankes,R. David
T1 The digital reference research agenda
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 4
SP 301
OP 311
AB A research agenda for the study of digital reference is presented. 
The agenda stems from a research symposium held at Harvard University, 
Boston, Massachusetts in August 2002. The agenda defines digital 
reference as the use of human intermediation to answer questions in a 
digital environment. The agenda also proposes the central research 
question in digital reference: How can human expertise be effectively 
and efficiently incorporated into information systems to answer user 
questions? The definition and question are used to outline a research 
agenda centered on how the exploration of digital reference relates to 
other fields of inquiry.
NO ID: 653
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106576732/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3291
A1 Lawal,Ibironke
T1 Scholarly Communication: The Use and Non-Use of E-Print Archives for 
the Dissemination of Scientific Information
JF Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship
YR 2002
IS 36
AB This study surveyed a randomly chosen sample from a population of 
240,000 scholars in nine scientific disciplines from private and public 
colleges and universities across the United States and Canada. The 
disciplines included physics/astronomy, chemistry, mathematics/computer 
science, engineering, cognitive science/psychology, and biological 
sciences. The survey sought to determine use and non-use of e-print 
archives in the different disciplines. Results show that 18 percent of 
the researchers use at least one archive while 82 percent do not use 
any. Scholars in physics use e-print archives the most and chemistry 
the least. ArXiv receives the most use and authors' web sites the least 
use. Reasons for use include dissemination of research results, 
visibility, and exposure of authors. Reasons for non-use include 
publishers' policies and technology constraints.
NO ID: 728
UL http://www.istl.org/02-fall/article3.html

RT Journal
ID 3292
A1 Lawes,Ann
T1 The Benefits of Quality Management to the Library and Information 
Service Profession
JF Special libraries
JO Spec.Libr.
YR 1993
VO 84
IS 3
SP 142
OP 146
AB In this paper, the marketing and public relations of the information 
services unit is considered to be a major aspect for increasing the 
quality management of the entire organization.
NO ID: 315

RT Journal
ID 3293
A1 Lawrence,Peter A.
T1 The politics of publication
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2003
VO 422
IS 6929
SP 259
OP 261
AB Examines the politics of scientific publication. Role of authors, 
reviewers and editors in protecting the quality of research; Trends in 
making decisions about the publication of a scientific paper; 
Implications for research and publication in biomedical science.
NO ID: 538

RT Journal
ID 3294
A1 Lawrence,Steve
T1 Online or Invisible?
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2001
VO 411
IS 6837
SP 521
AB Also entitled "Free online availability substantially increases a 
paper’s impact" -- Articles freely available online are more highly 
cited. For greater impact and faster scientific progress, authors and 
publishers should aim to make research easy to access. The volume of 
scientific literature typically far exceeds the ability of scientists 
to identify and utilize all relevant information in their research. 
Improvements to the accessibility of scientific literature, allowing 
scientists to locate more relevant research within a given time, have 
the potential to dramatically improve communication and progress in 
science. With the web, scientists now have very convenient access to an 
increasing amount of literature that previously required trips to the 
library, inter-library loan delays, or substantial effort in locating 
the source. Evidence shows that usage increases when access is more 
convenient [2], and maximizing the usage of the scientific record 
benefits all of society.
NO ID: 648
UL http://ivyspring.com/steveLawrence/SteveLawrence.htm

RT Journal
ID 3295
A1 Lawrence,Steve
A1 Giles,C. Lee
T1 Accessibility of information on the web
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 1999
VO 400
IS 6740
AB Search engines do not index sites equally, may not index new pages 
for months, and no engine indexes more than about 16 [percent] of the 
web. As the web becomes a major communications medium, the data on it 
must be made more accessible.
NO ID: 259

RT Journal
ID 3296
A1 Lawrence,Steve
A1 Pennock,David M.
A1 Flake,Gary W.
A1 Krovetz,Robert
A1 Coetzee,Frans M.
A1 Glover,Eric
A1 Nielsen,Finn A.
A1 Kruger,Andries
A1 Giles,C. Lee
T1 Persistence of Web references in scientific research
JF Computer
YR 2001
VO 34
IS 2
SP 26
OP 31
AB The lack of persistence of Web references has called into question 
the increasingly common practice of citing URLs in scientific papers. 
It is argued that although few critical resources have been lost to 
date, new strategies to manage Internet resources and improved citation 
practices are necessary to minimize the future loss of information.
NO ID: 426

RT Journal
ID 3297
A1 Le Beau,Chris
T1 Marketing Basics in a Changing Information Age
JF Nebraska Library Association Quarterly
YR 1999
VO 30
IS 4
SP 3
OP 11
AB Dr. John Workman, an associate professor of marketing at Creighton 
University, describes "marketing basics and how those basics could be 
applied to the profession. Dr. Workman is a frequent library user, and 
shares his perspective on marketing for libraries."
NO ID: 316
UL http://www.nol.org/home/NLA/nlaquarterly/1999-4-LeBeau.htm

RT Journal
ID 3298
A1 Leckie,Gloria J.
T1 Desperately seeking citations: uncovering faculty assumptions about 
the undergraduate research process
JF The Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 1996
VO 22
IS MayHave not read this yet.
SP 201
OP 208
AB Bibliographic instruction College and university students. College 
and university libraries Relations with faculty and curriculum.
NO ID: 133

RT Journal
ID 3299
A1 Leckie,Gloria J.
A1 Pettigrew,Karen E.
A1 Sylvain,Christian
T1 Modeling the information seeking of professionals: a general model 
derived from research on engineers, health care professionals, and 
lawyers
JF The Library Quarterly
YR 1996
VO 66
IS 2 (April)work roles, associated tasks, characteristics of 
information needs, awareness, sources, outcomes, complexity, feedback
SP 161
OP 193
K1 Research techniques Evaluation.
K1 Information needs
AB Drawing upon the existing research and previous attempts at modeling 
the information-seeking behavior of specific professional groups, this 
article posits an original model of information seeking that is 
applicable to all professionals. The model was developed through 
careful analysis and interpretation of empirical studies on the 
information habits and practices of three groups; engineers, health 
care professionals, and lawyers.
NO ID: 132

RT Journal
ID 3300
A1 Lee,Deborah
T1 Marketing for Libraries: Theory and Practice
JF Mississippi Libraries
YR 2000
VO 64
IS 4 (Winter)
SP 101
OP 103
AB Defines marketing, recommends that the marketing process begin with 
the library mission statement. The library should identify user groups 
and their needs. The marketing strategy should use the four P's - 
product, place, price, and promotion.
NO ID: 317

RT Journal
ID 3302
A1 Lee,Hur-Li
T1 Collection Development as a Social Process
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 1
SP 23
OP 31
AB This case study examines social influences in collection 
development. It shows that individuals' ideologies and political agenda 
shape their impression of user needs and their decision making. The 
study also reveals how the institution's operating structures, campus 
politics of interdisciplinarity, personnel deployment, and aspiration 
for prestige dominate collection development.
NO ID: 529

RT Journal
ID 3301
A1 Lee,Hur-Li
T1 What is a collection?
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 12
SP 1106
OP 1113
AB Advances in information technology have dramatically changed 
information seeking, and necessitate an examination of traditional 
conceptions of library collection. This article addresses the task and 
reveals four major presumptions associated with collections: 
tangibility, ownership, a user community, and an integrated retrieval 
mechanism. Some of these presumptions have served only to perpetuate 
misconceptions of collection. Others seem to have become more relevant 
in the current information environment. The emergence of nontraditional 
media, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), poses two specific challenges: 
to question the necessity of finite collections, and contest the 
boundaries of a collection. A critical analysis of these issues results 
in a proposal for an expanded concept of collection that considers the 
perspectives of both the user and the collection developer, invites 
rigorous user-centered research, and looks at the collection as an 
information-seeking context.
NO ID: 726
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/72514560/ABSTRACT

RT Newspaper Article
ID 3303
A1 Leibovich,Lori
T1 Choosing Quick Hits Over the Card Catalog : Many Students Prefer the 
Chaos of the Web to the Drudgery of the Library
JF New York Times
YR 2000
FD August 10, 2000
SP G1
AB A team of researchers led by Prof. Eliot Soloway at the University 
of Michigan's School of Education recently studied the way students 
approach Web searches. ''Kids think there is one answer, and they look 
for the Web site with that answer,'' said Professor Soloway, who does 
both computer science and education research. ''We try to explain that 
they have to get information from multiple Web sites. We tell them to 
ask open, deep, interesting questions. For example, 'How many moons 
does Jupiter have?' is not an interesting question. But 'What makes a 
volcano stop erupting?' is.'' One tool developed at Michigan is Artemis 
(named for the goddess of the hunt), which is being used in a half-
dozen school districts around the country. Artemis, which is designed 
for science-related searches, has a built-in dictionary and thesaurus 
because researchers noticed that students often misspelled search terms 
and did not know synonyms for the terms they were searching for. For 
example, many students know what photosynthesis is, but in the age of 
computer spelling checkers, they do not know how to write it. Artemis 
also lets students look at their past searches and lets them recommend 
sites to other students.
NO ID: 359
T2 New York Times
PP New York

RT Journal
ID 3304
A1 Leiner,Barry M.
A1 Cerf,Vinton G.
A1 Clark,David D.
A1 Kahn,Robert E.
A1 et al
T1 The past and future history of the Internet
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 27 pages.
SP 102
OP 108
K1 Internet
K1 History
K1 International
K1 Technological change
K1 Future
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (5250) Telecommunications systems
K1 (9180) International
AB The Internet has revolutionized the computer and communications 
world like nothing before. The Internet today is a widespread 
information infrastructure, the initial prototype of what is often 
called the National (or Global or Galactic) Information Infrastructure. 
The first recorded description of the social interactions that could be 
enabled through networking was a series of memos written August 1962 by 
J.C.R. Licklider of MIT. Leonard Kleinrock of MIT published the first 
paper on packet switching in July 1961. A colleague, Lawrence G. 
Roberts, went to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency in 1966 
to develop the computer network concept and quickly put together a plan 
for the ARPANET, publishing it in 1967. ARPANET was set up at UCLA, and 
a demonstration was presented in October 1972. Also in 1972, email was 
introduced. Today's Internet embodies a key underlying technical idea: 
open-architecture networking. The Internet is changing to provide such 
new services as real-time transport, supporting audio and video 
streams.
NO ID: 103

RT Journal
ID 3305
A1 LeJeune,Lorrie
T1 Who owns what?
JF The Journal of Electronic Publishing
YR 1999
VO 4
IS 3
AB Ownership of intellectual property is one of the most confusing and 
emotionally charged issues of the digital era. Before the advent of the 
Internet and the World Wide Web, it was difficult to dissect property -
- the message -- from the medium in which it traveled. Back then the 
laws governing the uses of both the medium and the message were 
relatively clear. Much has changed since those laws were conceived and 
enacted. An idea may now be expressed in many different media and the 
answers to such questions as "Who owns what?" and "What, exactly, is 
owned?" and "What rights does ownership convey?" are the subjects of 
heated debate. This issue of JEP offers a snapshot of both the 
topography of this new world and the issues surrounding intellectual 
property as we near the end of a century of change.
NO ID: 248
UL http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/04-03/glos0403.html

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3306
A1 Lenares,Deborah
T1 Faculty Use of Electronic Journals at Research Institutions
YR 1999
SP X
OP Y
AB The meteoric rise in the number of electronic journals published 
during the 1990s (see Figure 1) is documented in the ARL Directory of 
Electronic Journals, Newsletters and Academic Discussion Lists, 
published annually since 1991. The number of electronic journals listed 
in the 1991 directory was 27. The first significant increase in the 
number listed was a jump from 45 in 1993, to 181 in 1994. In 1995 the 
number rose to 306, in 1996 the number listed surged to 1093, and it 
surged again in 1997 to 2459 (ARL, 1997). Although the exact numbers of 
new journals published since 1997 cannot be reported until the release 
of the 8th edition of the ARL Directory, an extrapolation of the growth 
curve shows the expected increase. She covers the areas of physical 
science, biological science, social science, arts & humanities in terms 
of electronic journal use by discipline.
NO ID: 738
T2 Racing toward tomorrow : proceedings of the Ninth National 
Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, April 
8-11, 1999
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Detroit
UL http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlevents/lenares99.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3307
A1 Lengsfeld,Corinne S.
A1 Edelstein,Gerald
T1 Engineering Concepts and Communication: A Two-Quarter Course 
Sequence
JF Journal of Engineering Education
JO J Eng Educ
YR 2004
VO 93
IS 1
SP 79
OP 85
AB The ability to communicate a technical concept clearly, concisely, 
and completely is an essential engineering skill. Typically, 
universities teach English composition core courses in separate 
locations and with no concern about the material presented in 
engineering. The same can be said for the freshman introductory 
engineering courses and their intentional teaching of writing. This 
physical disconnect delays the development of essential skills because 
students rarely translate acquired skills from one class to the other. 
To minimize this disconnect the University of Denver's Engineering 
Department developed a strong link between the first-year composition 
courses and the introductory engineering course sequence. However, 
these activities led to an unanticipated outcome of increased student 
retention.
NO ID: 596

RT Journal
ID 3308
A1 Leveson,Nancy G.
T1 Software engineering: Stretching the limits of complexity
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 23 pages.
SP 129
OP 131
K1 Software
K1 Design engineering
K1 Problems
K1 Innovations
K1 Predictions
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (5400) Research & development
AB Software engineering has come a long way since the 1960s and the 
first attempts to make the field into an engineering discipline. The 
first 50 years may be characterized as the learning about the limits of 
the field, which are intimately bound up with the limits of complexity 
with which humans can cope. Although much progress has been made in 
building the engineering and mathematical foundations of software 
engineering and in improving the ability to build complex software, the 
problems are getting more difficult to solve. The problems are also 
changing in their fundamental nature. The earlier emphasis on 
efficiency has shifted to an emphasis on correctness and utility. 
Economic considerations have increased the emphasis on reuse and 
reusable components. These trends will continue in the next 50 years. 
To successfully build and operate ever more complex systems, it is 
necessary to find ways to augment human ability, both in terms of 
system designers and system users, with ideas from cognitive psychology 
and the social sciences.
NO ID: 107

RT Book, Section
ID 3309
A1 Lewenstein,Bruce V.
T1 A survey of activities in public communication of science and 
technology in the United States
YR 1994
SP 119
OP 178
NO ID: 244
A2 Schiele,Bernard
T2 When Science Becomes Culture: World Survey of Scientific Culture: 
Proceedings 1
PB University of Ottawa Press
PP Boucherville, Quebec, Canada

RT Journal
ID 3310
A1 Lewis,Ricki
T1 Roadkill Rules: science via the roadside can provide some 
interesting insights
JF The Scientist
YR 2004
VO 18
IS 16
AB This author has a fascination for roadkill.
NO ID: 799
UL http://www.the-scientist.com/2004/8/30/60/1

RT Journal
ID 3311
A1 Liedes,Jukka
T1 Copyright: evolution, not revolution
JF Science
JO Science
YR 1997
VO 276
IS April 11
SP 233
OP 235
AB The development of digital infrastructures and the internet has made 
the marketplace for literature, music, images, computer programs, and 
databases a truly global one. Protection of works of the mind must be a 
part of the new digital environment.
NO ID: 73

RT Journal
ID 3312
A1 Lindquist,Mats G.
T1 Not Your Father's References: Citations in the Digital Space
JF Journal of Electronic Publishing
YR 1999
VO 4
IS 3 (March)This paper was adapted from one prepared for the AAAS-ICSU 
Press-UNESCO Workshop on Developing Practices and Standards for 
Electronic Publishing in Science, Paris, October 12-14, 1998.
AB Science is a cumulative activity in which published works make up 
the stock of scientific ideas. The timespan and spatial reach of 
science transcends the work of the individual researcher, who digs into 
the past for inspiration and understanding, and in his turn lays 
another course of knowledge for those who will follow. That is the 
nature of scientific inquiry: to relate and position ideas, insights, 
and data.
NO ID: 176
UL http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/04-03/lindquist.html

RT Journal
ID 3313
A1 Litwach,Leon
T1 Has the Library Lost its Soul?
JF California Monthly
YR 1998
VO 108
IS 4 (February)
AB With the library now facing a further erosion of purchasing power, 
and with an administration that has yet to address seriously the 
implications of this erosion, this committee (The Academic Senate's 
Library Committee) must report its inability to stem the rapid bleeding 
of library resrouces and the devastating and irreparable damage to the 
quality of our teaching and scholarship.
NO ID: 129
UL 
http://www.alumni.berkeley.edu/monthly/monthly_index/feb_98/library.htm
l

RT Journal
ID 3314
A1 Liu,Meng-Xiong
A1 Wei,Wei
T1 Science-Technology librarians in California: their background, 
performance and expectations
JF Journal of Educational Media & Library Sciences
YR 1993
VO 31
IS 1
SP 28
OP 40
AB About half of the librarians in university science and technology 
libraries neither have degrees in scientific or technical disciplines, 
nor receive much structured preparation for the responsibilities they 
are assuming. The study investigates this situation by examining 
sci/tech librarian's background, job performance, job satisfaction, 
training availability, and career expectations.
NO ID: 245

RT Journal
ID 3315
A1 Lochstet,Gwenn S.
A1 Lehman,Donna H.
T1 A correlation method for collecting reference statistics. at the 
University of South Carolina
JF Coll Res Libr
YR 1999
FD Jan.
VO 60
IS 1
SP 45
OP 53
AB College and university libraries -- Reference services. Reference 
services -- South Carolina. Statistics. Thomas Cooper Library.
NO BLIB99001006 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0010-0870 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 461

RT Report
ID 3316
A1 Logan,Rochelle M.
T1 Library Service in an Engineering Environment
YR 1998
FD May 20, 1998
SP 1
OP 10
NO ID: 126
PP Denver, CO
T3 Tertiary Library Service in an Engineering Environment

RT Journal
ID 3317
A1 Lombardo,Shawn V.
A1 Condic,Kristine Salomon
T1 Convenience or content: a study of undergraduate periodical use
JF Ref Serv Rev
YR 2001
VO 29
IS 4
SP 327
OP 338
K1 Descriptor: Use studies -- Serial publications.
K1 College and university libraries -- Serial publications.
K1 Full-text databases.
K1 Named Corp: Kresge Library (Rochester, Mich.) -- Serial publications
AB Full-text periodical databases have changed how students access 
research materials. Many librarians fear that students favor the 
convenience of full-text databases over more valuable information found 
in print periodical literature. To what extent is this true? A study 
was undertaken at Oakland University to determine how well students 
mastered the retrieval process for print and full-text articles, and to 
gather their opinions on the value of both formats. A pre-/post-test 
instrument was administered to students before and after instruction to 
measure their knowledge of the library and its databases. A final test, 
including questions designed to measure student attitudes about the 
article retrieval process, was administered upon completion of a term 
paper. Results indicate that many students valued the convenience of 
full-text articles over the article's relevance, but they also found 
the overall research process to be difficult. The research students 
conducted also impacted on their test results. Other findings are 
discussed.
NO BLIB02003283 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0090-7324 Details: 
bibl tab. article feature article; ID: 503

RT Book, Whole
ID 3318
A1 Lord,Charles R.
T1 Guide to Information Sources in Engineering
YR 2000
NO ID: 261
PB Libraries Unlimited
PP Englewood, CO
SN 1-56308-699-9

RT Journal
ID 3319
A1 Loughner,William
T1 Scientific journal usage in a large university library: a local 
citation analysis
JF Serials Librarian
YR 1996
VO 29
IS 3/4
SP 79
OP 88
AB He developed a software tool that could take information from the 
ISI Science Citation Index (SCI) CD-ROM and derive citation analysis 
for a local institution. In his case, it was the University of Georgia.
NO ID: 146

RT Journal
ID 3320
A1 Lozano,Ana Reyes Pacios
T1 A Customer Orientation Checklist: a Model
JF Library Review
YR 2000
VO 49
IS 4
SP 173
OP 178
AB Written to help libraries adapt to the clientelle's information 
needs and demands. Good bibliography.
NO ID: 318

RT Book, Section
ID 3321
A1 Lucker,Jay K.
T1 The Changing nature of scientific and technical librarianship: a 
personal perspective over 40 years
YR 1998
SP 3
OP 10
NO co-published simultaneously as Science & technology libraries, 
v17(2) 1998.; ID: 218
A2 Hallmark,Julie
A2 Seidman,Ruth K.
T2 Sci/tech librarianship : education and training
PB Haworth
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 3322
A1 Luther,Judy
T1 White Paper on Electronic Journal Usage Statistics
JF Serials Librarian
YR 2001
VO 41
IS 2
SP 119
OP 148?
AB Examines electronic journal usage statistics in the United States. 
Development of data collection policies; Issues of common concern to 
librarians and publishers; Budget justification; Publisher issues; 
Production of reliable and useful data; Agreement on basic data 
elements to be collected; Data reliability; Evolution of electronic 
journals to publisher-hosted databases.
NO ID: 548

RT Journal
ID 3323
A1 Luzi,Daniela
T1 Trends and evolution in the development of grey literature: a review
JF International Journal on Grey Literature
YR 2000
VO 1
IS 3
SP 106
OP 117
AB This paper outlines the principal stages in the development of grey 
literature (GL), from its first appearance in the post-war period to 
its evolution into electronic GL. To this end, the study analyses some 
of the most important studies and conferences organised up to the 
1990s. It also examines the first bibliographies and databases, which 
transformed the way in which GL was collected and distributed. The 
second part of the paper briefly outlines the main subjects addressed 
at international GL conferences, identifying both elements of 
continuity with earlier work and new developments.
NO ID: 273

RT Journal
ID 3324
A1 Lyman,Peter
T1 What is a digital library? technology, intellectual property, and 
the public interest
JF Daedalus
JO Daedalus
YR 1996
VO 125
IS 4
SP 1
OP 33
AB Will digital libraries, electronic publishing, and information 
highways constitute the marketplace of ideas for an information 
society? This article tries to answer that question. Futurists often 
conceal the tensions between digital technology and the institutions of 
an idustrialized society, tensions that lead to important questions 
about the nature of the digital library.
NO ID: 74

RT Journal
ID 3325
A1 Lynch,Clifford
T1 Digital Library Opportunities
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 5
SP 286
OP 289
AB I thought instead I would focus on places where maybe we can make a 
difference through grassroots level individual institutional 
initiatives, and places where intellectual shifts are important––where 
we really need to consider how the world is changing and to recognize 
that the opportunities for the future call for thinking very 
differently than we have thought about things in the past.
NO ID: 597
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(03)00067-3

RT Book, Whole
ID 3326
A1 Lynch,Mary Jo
T1 Academic libraries : research perspectives
YR 1990
SP 271
AB Some interesting chapters include "Bibliometrics: Library Use and 
Citation Studies", Paul Metz. Access Services, Jo Bell Whitlatch.
NO ID: 855
PB American Library AssociationLynch, Mary Jo
PP Chicago
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/cZ675.U5+A233+1990

RT Journal
ID 3327
A1 Lyon,Joe
T1 Can You Sell Information Like Cornflakes?
JF Library Manager
YR 1994
VO 1
IS November
SP 11
OP 12
AB The British Library Science Reference and Information Service 
reports on their marketing efforts in promoting its priced services to 
the business and scientific communities. Other libraries are mentioned 
in the article.
NO ID: 319

RT Report
ID 3328
A1 MacLeod,Roddy
T1 Update on Engineering Information Resources
YR 2005
AB PowerPoint presented at Linline Information, 2005 in London? Where 
to find news on Engineering information resources, Publishers and 
content providers exhibiting at Online 2005, Some other players, Some 
interesting developments & trends, Plug my book, & article in Free 
Pint, Handouts – URLs and Stands
NO ID: 869
T3 Tertiary Update on Engineering Information Resources
UL http://www.hw.ac.uk/libwww/libram/online2005update.ppt

RT Journal
ID 3329
A1 MacLeod,Roddy
A1 Ng,Lisa
T1 Shoestring Marketing: examples from EEVL
JF Ariadne
YR 2001
IS 27
AB Marketing had been deficient for EEVL, an Enhanced and Evaluated 
Virtual Library, a hub for engineering, math and cs resources. They 
document step taken to promote their services.
NO ID: 320
UL http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue27/eevl/

RT Book, Whole
ID 3330
A1 Macleod,Roderick A.
A1 Corlett,Jim
T1 Information sources in engineering
YR 2005
SP 683
AB This review is from http://stlq.info/archives/002055.html#002055, by 
Randy Reichardt. The third edition of this title, edited by KW Mildren 
and PJ Hicks, appeared in 1996, and was divided into three sections, 
totalling 36 chapters: primary information sources (reports, standards, 
patents and patent information, journals, conferences and theses, and 
product information), secondary information sources (abstracts, 
indexes, bibliographies and reviews, electronic sources, and standard 
reference sources), and 27 chapters on specialized subject fields such 
as stress analysis, robotics and automated manufacturing, and 
thermodynamics and thermal systems. The fourth edition of Information 
Sources in Engineering expands somewhat on the primary and secondary 
information sources, while condensing the specialized subject fields of 
engineering to the more traditional disciplines such as chemical, 
civil, environmental, materials, mechanical, and so on. The book opens 
with a chapter on engineers and their information needs. Martin Ward 
provides a useful introduction to engineers, covering their role in 
society, themes and aspects common to engineerings, and comparisons 
with scientists. He addresses theory and practice, and gives extensive 
coverage to the engineering knowledge base, examining its contents and 
the engineers' use of knowledge resources. I was surprised to find no 
references to the Tenopir and King book, Communication Patterns of 
Engineers2, published in December 2003, or to Thomas Pinelli's article, 
"Distinguishing Engineers from Scientists - The Case for an Engineering 
Knowledge Community"3, which appeared in the Vol. 21, No 3/4 2001 issue 
of Science and Technology Libraries. Perhaps neither was available 
before the chapter was completed. Regardless, no mention of either 
article does not detract from Ward's excellent introduction. The twelve 
chapters that follow discuss in detail different categories of primary 
and secondary engineering information sources, including: journals and 
e-journals, reports, theses and research in progress, conferences, 
patents, standards, product information, electronic full-text sources, 
abstracts and indexes, bibliographies and reviews, internet resources, 
reference sources, and professional societies. Such an approach exposes 
the reader to the wide variety of categories and formats covering 
primary and secondary engineering literature. The final fourteen 
chapters cover the main subject areas of engineering: aerospace and 
defence, bioengineering/biomedical, chemical, civil, 
electrical/electronic/computer, engineering design, environmental, 
manufacturing, materials, mechanical, mining and mineral process, 
nanotechnology, occupational safety and health, and petroleum and 
offshore engineering. The most extensive subject coverage is provided 
in the chapters on aerospace and defence (43 pages), civil (39 pages), 
materials (45 pages), and mechanical (54 pages long.) These and most 
other chapters include information on specific resources such as 
handbooks and manuals, indexes and abstracts, standards, directories, 
monographs, important journal and serial publications, statistical 
information, etc.
NO ID: 874
PB K.G. Saur
PP München
SN 3598244428
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i3598244428

RT Journal
ID 3331
A1 Macpherson,Karen
T1 An information processing model of undergraduate electronic database 
information retrieval
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 4
SP 333
OP 347
AB In this paper, it is suggested that a number of theoretical and 
practical perspectives on information literacy can be obtained through 
the examination of tenets of cognitive psychology. One aspect of 
cognitive psychology - information processing theory - is applied to 
the development of a two-stage model of the information retrieval 
process. This model of information retrieval has utility along two 
dimensions: firstly, in the conceptualization of the information 
retrieval process; and secondly, in the development of teaching 
strategies informed by such a model. The efficacy of this model was 
tested in a large two-phase experimental study at the University of 
Canberra, Australia. Statistically significant results support the 
effectiveness of the concept-based teaching of information retrieval 
and the utility of the model as an explanation of the cognitive 
underpinnings of information retrieval.
NO ID: 651
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106567933/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3333
A1 Magner,Denise K.
T1 Seeking a radical change in the role of publishing
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2000
VO 46
IS 41
SP A16
AB The world of scholarly publishing -- shaken by sharp increases in 
both the cost and sheer volume of academic journals -- cannot be 
sustained, according to an agreement released last week by a group of 
campus administrators, publishers, librarians, and association leaders. 
Joining forces, they have crafted a set of nine principles to "guide 
the transformation of the scholarly publishing system."
NO ID: 798
UL http://chronicle.com/free/v46/i41/41a01601.htm

RT Journal
ID 3332
A1 Magner,Denise K.
T1 Journal Articles Are a Poor Basis for Judging Engineering and 
Computing Professors, Report Says
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 1999
FD September 14
AB Relying on journal articles to evaluate engineering and computer-
science professors for promotion and tenure is a mistake, according to 
a statement released last week by the Computing Research Association. 
The statement urges academe to place as much weight on papers written 
for conferences and on the "artifacts" created by professors -- such as 
software -- as on published articles.
NO ID: 817
UL http://chronicle.com/free/99/09/99091404n.htm

RT Journal
ID 3334
A1 Magrill,Rose Mary
A1 St. Clair,Gloriana
T1 Undergraduate term paper citation patterns by disciplines and level 
of course
JF Collect Manage
YR 1990
VO 12
IS 3-4
SP 25
OP 56
K1 Descriptor: Citation analysis.
K1 Use studies -- College and university libraries
AB Descriptor: Citation analysis. Use studies -- College and university 
libraries. At four institutions in Texas, Oregon and Iowa.
NO BLIB90012146 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0146-2679 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 470

RT Journal
ID 3335
A1 Malakoff,David
T1 Scholarly Journals: Librarians Seek to Block Merger of Scientific 
Publishing Giants
JF Science
JO Science
YR 2000
VO 290
IS 5493
SP 910
OP 911
AB Research librarians have asked the U.S. government to block one of 
the biggest ever science publishing mergers as part of a battle against 
spiraling subscription prices and the growing concentration of 
ownership of academic journals. Their target is the European journal 
giant Reed Elsevier, which last week announced that it will swallow 
American rival Harcourt General for $4.5 billion, creating a global 
company with more than 1500 journals, including a substantial fraction 
of all biomedical titles.
NO ID: 215
UL http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/290/5493/910

RT Journal
ID 3336
A1 Maple,Amanda
A1 Wright,Carol
A1 Seeds,Robert
T1 Analysis of format duplication in an academic library collection
JF Library Collections, Acquisitions, & Technical Services
YR 2003
VO 27
IS 4
SP 425
OP 442
AB The issue of format duplication in academic library collections is 
increasingly complicated and perplexing in an environment of static or 
dwindling resources, soaring user expectations, dynamic access models, 
and inconsistent and changing publisher and vendor pricing structures. 
The problem is further complicated for libraries serving a university 
with multiple campus locations. This paper surveys recent investigative 
projects and highlights the work of a Duplicate Formats Task Force at 
Pennsylvania State University charged with determining the extent and 
nature of format duplication at that institution.
NO ID: 590
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lcats.2003.09.003

RT Journal
ID 3337
A1 Marchionini,Gary
A1 Fox,Edward A.
T1 Digital libraries: Introduction
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 2001
VO 44
IS 5
SP 31
OP 32
AB Digital libraries have evolved rapidly over the past decade and are 
now as varied as physical libraries. Although digital libraries have 
been driven mainly by developments in technology, progress has also 
been made in addressing the intellectual and social issues involved in 
sharing knowledge in digital forms.
NO ID: 768
UL http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/374308.374329

RT Journal
ID 3338
A1 Marcum,Deanna
T1 Requirements for the future digital library
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 5
SP 276
OP 279
AB Politicians give us many reasons to worry, and I don't usually hold 
them up for public praise. But there is one thing politicians often do 
extremely well—they describe things in simple terms that everyone can 
understand. Al Gore, for example, when describing the virtues of 
technology, painted a verbal picture of a day when the contents of the 
Library of Congress would be available online to every school child in 
America. Librarians across the country winced at that notion, 
particularly when they heard Gore's description paraphrased by local 
administrators and trustees. Collectively, librarians protested—"No, 
no, that image is too simple. We can't put everything online. We don't 
have enough money. We don't have all the legally required rights and 
permissions." Also, perhaps most vehemently, we librarians protested 
that not everything that could or should be digitized is in the Library 
of Congress.
NO ID: 598
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(03)00065-X

RT Journal
ID 3339
A1 Marks,Jayne
A1 Hannay,Timo
T1 Evolving scholarly communication
JF Learned Publishing
YR 2004
VO 17
IS 1
SP 3
OP 6
AB Scientists and funding bodies are actively questioning the role of 
the article and of publishers in scholarly communication. This view is 
driven by lack of adequate funding to cope with the growing output of 
research and by a vision of scientists that the Web can and should 
offer seamless searching and access to research when and where they 
need it.
NO ID: 604
UL http://puck.ingentaselect.com/vl=5016314/cl=44/nw=1/rpsv/cgi-
bin/linker?ini=alpsp&reqidx=/cw/alpsp/09531513/v17n1/s1/p3

RT Journal
ID 3340
A1 Marra,Monica
T1 Outreach activities in the astronomical research institutions and 
the role of librarians: What happens in Italy
JF Information Services & Use
YR 2004
VO 24
IS 2
SP 99
OP 102
AB Outreach activities can be considered a new frontier of all the main 
astronomical research institutions worldwide and are a part of their 
mission that earns great appreciation from the general public. Here the 
situation at INAF, the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics, is 
examined and a more active role for librarians is proposed.
NO ID: 568

RT Journal
ID 3341
A1 Martin,Stana B.
T1 Information Technology, Employment, and the Information Sector: 
Trends in Information Employment 1970-1995
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1998
VO 49
IS 12
SP 1053
OP 1069
AB Since 1970, there have been massive changes in both the U.S. economy 
and the technologies of information handling. Both of these have 
implications for employment in the information sector. This article 
updates the data on the occupational structure of information work, 
1970-1995 inclusive. The data indicate that the information sector 
continues to grow as a proportion of all employment, albeit slower in 
recent years. The data also indicate that, within the information 
sector, information workers who handle information in non-routine ways 
are growing faster than information workers who handle information in 
routine ways. This article explores these trends in relation to the 
effects of information technology.
NO ID: 147

RT Journal
ID 3342
A1 Martin,Susan K.
T1 When Is Enough Enough?
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2003
VO 3
IS 1
SP vii
OP ix
AB For years librarians have been struggling with the dilemma of how to 
provide their scholars and students with the journal articles they need 
for their research and studies within a materials budget that has never 
kept pace with the rate of inflation of much publishing output, notably 
in the disciplines of science, technology, and medicine (STM). If this 
dilemma is news to anyone, that person has been living the life of Rip 
Van Winkle.
NO ID: 515

RT Journal
ID 3343
A1 Mason,Marilyn Gell
T1 The Yin and Yang of Knowing
JF Daedalus
JO Daedalus
YR 1996
VO 125
IS 4
SP 147
AB The growing use of communication technologies in libraries indicates 
the coming of the information revolution. This makes some ask whether 
print will soon be replaced by digitized information. However, in 
today's world of knowledge, libraries must offer both printed and 
digitized documents.
NO ID: 349

RT Report
ID 3344
A1 Matylonek,John
A1 Kristick,Laurel
T1 Going for King of the Hill: Growing a Top-tier Collection of 
Engineering Materials and Bibliographic Databases
AB The challenge for the engineering librarian and the OSU Libraries 
collection development department is to determine the core library 
services to support the nation's top tier engineering programs. A 
benchmark collection of databases and services would help OSU Libraries 
identify those resources needed to bolster the College of Engineering's 
drive toward top tier status. Budgeting for these resources or 
directing enhancements to OSU Libraries database services could begin 
once these core services are identified. The librarian responsible for 
engineering conducted a survey of the libraries that serve the top 25 
engineering programs in the country to address these concerns. The 
results of the survey may generally be useful to engineering collection 
assessment nationwide.
NO ID: 357
PP Corvallis, OR (Oregon State University)
T3 Tertiary Going for King of the Hill: Growing a Top-tier Collection 
of Engineering Materials and Bibliographic Databases
UL http://osulibrary.orst.edu/staff/matylonj/review/king.doc

RT Journal
ID 3346
A1 McCain,Katherine W.
T1 Sharing digitized research-related information on the World Wide Web
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 14
SP 1321
OP 1327
AB Five-hundred twenty-seven full bibliographic records containing URLs 
were downloaded from the ISI SCISEARCH database as part of an 
exploration of the extent of Web publication of electronic research-
related information (E-RRI) in the sciences and classified as to 
resource type, subject area, and degree of intellectual property 
protection. Four hundred eighty-five records represented nonduplicate 
descriptions of data compilations (194), software (153), Websites (73), 
electronic documents (49), and digitized images (17). The greatest 
concentration of E-RRI was found in molecular biology (QP=123), general 
natural history and biology (QH=84), and medicine (R=74). Roughly two-
thirds of the 410 accessible Webpages (67%) permitted totally free and 
unrestricted public access and use of the information; 11% requested 
citation of a related journal article as acknowledgment of use; the 
remainder stated conditions for use or relied on a statement of 
copyright as an indication of ownership. The World Wide Web appears to 
have become a significant channel for scientists to distribute 
databases, software, and other information related to their published 
research.
NO ID: 211
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/74500482/START

RT Book, Section
ID 3345
A1 McCain,Katherine W.
T1 Core journal networks and cocitation maps in the marine sciences: 
tools for information management in interdisciplinary research
YR 1992
SP 3
OP 7
AB Marine biology and physical oceanography, Periodicals, Marine 
sciences. Citation analysis.
NO BLIB92013274 Provider: OCLC; il. 0938734695 Related Record: 
blib92013160 English analytic; ID: 447
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (55th :1992 
:Pittsburgh, Pa.). ASIS '92 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Journal
ID 3347
A1 McCain,Katherine W.
A1 Bobick,James E.
T1 Patterns of Journal Use in a Departmental Library: A Citation 
Analysis
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1981
FD Jul
VO 32
IS 4
SP 257
OP 267
K1 Citations (References)
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Use Studies
K1 Bibliometrics
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Bibliographies
K1 Biology
K1 College Faculty
K1 Doctoral Dissertations
K1 Publications
K1 Tables (Data)
AB Citation analysis of faculty publications, doctoral dissertations, 
and preliminary doctoral qualifying briefs produced by faculty and 
students of Temple University's biology department is used to assess 
journal use in the biology library during the years 1975-1977. Forty 
references are cited. (Author/FM)
NO EJ248940; English Jul 1981 256 198107 Journal Article (CIJE) a 
IR509271 CIJNOV1981 080 Journal Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 406

RT Journal
ID 3348
A1 McCann,Jean
T1 Posting Progress : Increase in posters at scientific meetings 
mirrors expansion of life science topics, agendas
JF The Scientist
YR 2000
VO 14
IS 21 (October 21)
AB In the beginning, there were no posters. Now, many scientific 
meetings have thousands of them. At the 50th meeting of the American 
Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) in Philadelphia, Oct. 4-7, scientists 
signed up for 2,147 posters, compared to 287 slide presentations. 
Douglas Marchuk, associate professor in the department of genetics at 
Duke University, and this year's head of the ASHG program committee, 
describes the poster evolution this way: "In l977 and l978 they were 
all slide sessions. In l979 we went to posters, and it was a 50-50 mix, 
but by l982, it was 28 percent slides and 82 percent posters. This year 
it was 88 percent posters and 12 percent slide sessions."
NO ID: 213
UL http://www.the-scientist.com/yr2000/oct/mccann_p8_001030.html

RT Newspaper Article
ID 3349
A1 McCarthy,Ellen
T1 Web is a vital college 'utility,' study reports
JF Washington Post
YR 2002
FD September 16
SP 5
AB Just because that college junior still has not found his way to the 
campus library does not mean he is an academic slacker. Almost three-
quarters of U.S. college students now use the Internet more than the 
library, and a strong majority said the Net has been an asset to their 
educational experience, according to a report expected to be released 
today. The study, conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life 
Project, found that 86 percent of college students have gone online, 
compared with 59 percent of the general population. "One of the things 
that jumped out was the degree to which college students have 
integrated the Internet into their everyday life. They are used to 
high-speed, instant access. They treat it like they would any utility -
- water, telephones, television," said Steve Jones, the study's author 
and head of the Communications Department at the University of Illinois 
at Chicago. The study is based on more than 2,000 surveys from 
undergraduate students at 27 U.S. colleges and universities as well as 
observational research done at 10 Chicago-area schools.
NO ID: 427
T2 Washington Post
PP Washington, DCEditor

RT Journal
ID 3350
A1 McCook,Alison
T1 Open-access journals rank well: Report suggests similar impact 
factors for open-access and traditional journals
JF The Scientist
YR 2004
FD April 27
AB The impact factors of nearly 200 open-access journals are similar to 
those of traditional journals in the same fields, according to a recent 
Thomson ISI report -- http://www.isinet.com/oaj. The 58 open-access 
medical journals that receive impact factors fell, on average, at the 
40th percentile of all medical journals, with all but 11 ranking higher 
than the 10th percentile. For life sciences journals, the 37 open-
access journals were ranked, on average, at the 39th percentile. Since 
the percentile indicates the journal's rank within its discipline, 50th 
percentile is literally average, according to James Pringle, vice 
president for Development in Academic and Government Markets for 
Thomson ISI.
NO ID: 781
UL http://www.biomedcentral.com/news/20040427/05

RT Journal
ID 3351
A1 McDonald,Robert H.
A1 Sears,JoAnn
A1 Mitchell,Cindy
T1 Footballs and URLs: Marketing Your Library and its Online Presence
JF Computers in Libraries
YR 2000
VO 20
IS 8
SP 44
OP 48
AB "If you can’t figure out how college football games and library 
marketing are related, then you aren’t thinking as creatively as the 
folks at Auburn University. Check out their sports-related success 
story."
NO ID: 321

RT Journal
ID 3353
A1 McGeachin,Robert B.
T1 The Impact of Electronic Bibliographic Databases and Electronic 
Journal Articles on the Scholar's Information Seeking Behavior and 
Personal Collection of ”Reprints”
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 2004
VO 25
IS 1/2
SP 127
OP 137
AB This article examines the potential changes to the 
informationseeking behavior of scholars and how they manage their own 
collection of research article “reprints.” With bibliographic databases 
and electronic journals provided by academic libraries now available at 
the science scholars' computer desktops, they can now locate and 
acquire a portion of needed research articles on their own at any time. 
They also, in some cases, have older paper copies scanned and delivered 
by libraries as image files at Web retrieval locations. Bibliographic 
citation management software is now in use by many scholars. Personal 
information management software is available and could also be used. 
This article reviews possible scenarios scholars can use to manage this 
new electronic collection of research articles and possible ways 
libraries can help them in this scholarly activity.
NO ID: 562
UL 
https://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ698
9HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&ID=47985

RT Journal
ID 3352
A1 McGeachin,Robert B.
T1 Selection criteria for Web-based resources in a science and 
technology library collection
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 1998
IS Spring1092-1206
K1 Information systems Selection.
K1 Scientific and technical libraries Collection development.
K1 Internet Scientific and technical libraries
AB Discusses reasons to include Internet-based resources in a science 
and technology library collection. Many factors are examined, such as 
harware and software requirements, user access regulation, costs, user 
education and assistance, stability of the Internet location, 
licensing, cataloging, etc.
NO ID: 136

RT Report
ID 3354
A1 McGowan,Sonia Cawsey
T1 What every science major should know about scientific literature and 
libraries
YR 2000
FD September 14
SP 1
OP 6
AB Finding scientific information can be difficult, especially at small 
libraries such as Copley Library. This is due in part to the high 
degree of specialization in scientific research; however, the major 
problem with accessing the scientific literature is cost. In spite of 
the high cost of scientific information, students can access a variety 
of resources at Copley Library. The purpose of this document is to make 
students more aware of these resources.
NO ID: 254
PP San Diego
T3 Tertiary What every science major should know about scientific 
literature and libraries
UL http://www.acusd.edu/~scawsey/base.html

RT Journal
ID 3355
A1 McGrath,William E.
T1 Relationships between hard/soft, pure/applied, and life/nonlife 
disciplines and subject book use in a university library
JF Information Processing & Management
YR 1978
VO 14
IS 1
SP 17
OP 28
AB In a university library, variability in circulation of books by 
subject area is partly but directly dependent on the academic program—
e.g. if the anthropology department enrolls more students than the 
physics department, then more anthropology books should circulate. 
However, if the number of students enrolled in each subject is the 
same, the number of books circulated in one subject may still be larger 
than in the other. Therefore, other sources accounting for variability 
must be sought. One possible source is in the nature of the subjects 
themselves. For example, subjects (as represented by academic 
disciplines or departments) are often called hard or soft, pure or 
applied, life or nonlife. The purpose of this paper was to determine 
the relationship between these characteristics and the number of books 
charged out of an academic library by students. Three major hypotheses 
were formulated: (1) the softer a subject, the more books charged on 
that subject; the harder the subject, the fewer the books charged; (2) 
the purer the subject, the more books charged; the more applied the 
subject, the fewer the books charged; (3) The more a subject can be 
characterized as life oriented, the greater the difference in number of 
books charged between that subject and those characterized as nonlife 
oriented. A scale value for each characteristic in each of 60 academic 
subjects was determined by a survey of faculty of the University of 
Southwestern Louisiana. Correlation and multiple regression were 
employed to assess the proportion of circulation variance accounted for 
by each of the three characteristics. Other variables—masters, upper 
and lower level enrollments, credit hours being taught, number of books 
already in the library, and level of degree offered—were tested as 
controls. Hypothesis (1) was weakly supported under the condition that 
shelflist and masters enrollments were held constant (3% of variance). 
Support was somewhat firmer (10% variance) when the dependent variable 
was defined as proportion of shelflist circulated. Hard/soft was also 
significant (15% of variance) when pure/applied was held constant, but 
shelflist and enrollments were not. Hypothesis (2) was modestly 
supported under the condition that other variables were not held 
constant. Otherwise pure/applied was not significant. Together, 
pure/applied and hard/soft, in that order, and when no other variables 
were controlled accounted for 26% of the variance. Hypothesis (3) was 
not supported under any of the conditions tested. Results have 
implications in sociological understanding of the relationship between 
disciplines and library use, in formulating a rationale for library 
collection building, and in administrative, budget allocations to 
subjects.
NO ID: 812

RT Journal
ID 3356
A1 McKiernan,Gerry
T1 arXiv.org: the Los Alamos National Laboratory e-print server
JF International Journal on Grey Literature
YR 2000
VO 1
IS 3
SP 127
OP 138
AB Since its creation nearly ten years ago, the Los Alamos National 
Laboratory (LANL) e-print service (arXiv.org) has revolutionized 
scholarly communication within many scientific communities. It has also 
inspired the development of alternatives to conventional and electronic 
journal publication in a variety of other disciplines. The LANL e-print 
database is also serving as the core collection for two major 
investigations that seek to enhance access and navigation within and 
between electronic archives and special collections.
NO ID: 274

RT Journal
ID 3357
A1 McKiernan,Gerry
T1 ResearchIndex: autonomous citation indexing on the Web
JF International Journal on Grey Literature
YR 2000
VO 1
IS 1
SP 41
OP 46
AB ResearchIndex is a recently-announced service that can identify and 
index citations found within Web-based electronic publications without 
human intervention. In addition to indexing electronic journals, 
ResearchIndex can automatically index non-journal literature including 
reports, conference papers, and preprints, among other types of grey 
literature. It offers users the opportunity to view the textual context 
of a candidate cited work and provides access to the full-text of any 
incorporated source document. Access to related and similar work in the 
ResearchIndex corpus is also made available.
NO ID: 814
UL http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/ResearchIndex.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3358
A1 Mehta,Usha
A1 Young,Virginia E.
T1 Use of Electronic Information Resources: A survey of Science and 
Engineering Faculty
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1995
VO 15
IS 3
SP 43
OP 54
AB Electronic information systems and services are increasingly 
becoming a part of library services. This survey questioned the science 
and engineering faculty at the University of Alabama [about 1992] about 
their use of electronic resources to answer their scientific and 
technical information (STI) needs. Results indicate that although the 
users have some familiarity with electronic products, they still are 
inclined to sue print sources or informal channels to get needed 
information.
NO ID: 178

RT Report
ID 3359
A1 Meldrem,Joyce A. Ed
A1 Johnson,Carolyn Ed
T1 Brick and Click Libraries: How Do We Support Both? Proceedings of a 
Regional Academic Library Symposium (Iowa, Kansas, Missouri & Nebraska) 
(1st, Maryville, Missouri, October 26, 2001)
YR 2001
FD 10-26
SP 79
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Information Services
K1 Information Systems
K1 Reference Services
K1 Conference Papers
K1 Higher Education
K1 Internet
K1 Library Services
K1 Online Systems
K1 User Needs (Information)
AB This document presents the proceedings of a Regional Academic 
Library Symposium, "Brick and Click Libraries." Contributors are 
professionals from colleges and universities in the states of Iowa, 
Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. Papers include: "Library Web Site 
Redesign and Usability Testing" (Michelle Beattie and Susan Sykes 
Berry); "The Competition between Free Internet Search Services and 
Library Resources" (Xiaotian Chen); "Ebooks and the E-ssential Library: 
A Discourse on How the Electronic Book Might Enhance the Mission 
Centrality of Academic Libraries" (Rod Henshaw and Claudia Frazer); 
"Generation X Learning Styles and Online Instruction" (Lori Mardis, 
Vicki Wainscott, and Jolaine Zweifel); "'E-volving' To Meet the Needs 
of Remote Patrons: Access to Journal Articles" (Jodie Morin, Ann 
Klavano, and Margaret Stangohr); "Click and Brick: Mastering Discipline 
Specific Information Resources Using Library Resources, a College 
Portal and Course Management System" (Linda Loos Scarth); "Dreamweaver 
Workshop" (Carol Spradling and Carolyn Hardy); "Collaboration and 
Change in an Academic Branch Library: An Overview" (John Stratton and 
Nancy Burich); "Beyond Author/Title/Subject: Government Information in 
Context" (Geoffrey D. Swindells); "From Chaos to Consensus: A Hybrid 
Model of Web Page Management" (Connie Ury and Frank Baudino); 
"Integration of Instructional Technology into Courses" (Roger Von 
Holzen and Darla Runyon); "Tailoring Reference Services for the 21st 
Century User" (Daryl C. Youngman). (AEF)
NO English 20011026 Document (RIE) g IR058426 RIEAUG2002 2 021 
Collected Works--Proceedings; ID: 292
PP Missouri
T3 Tertiary Brick and Click Libraries: How Do We Support Both? 
Proceedings of a Regional Academic Library Symposium (Iowa, Kansas, 
Missouri & Nebraska) (1st, Maryville, Missouri, October 26, 2001)

RT Journal
ID 3360
A1 Menzel,Herbert
T1 The information needs of current scientific research
JF Library Quarterly
YR 1964
VO 34
IS 1
SP 4
OP 19
NO ID: 243

RT Journal
ID 3361
A1 Mercer,Linda S.
T1 Measuring the Use and Value of Electronic Journals and Books
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2000
FD Winter
IS 25
AB Much has been written on issues pertaining to licensing and 
archiving of digital information. Until recently, there has not been 
enough information to evaluate how these digital products, particularly 
journals, are being used. Furthermore, meaningful data are often 
difficult to obtain as some publishers and vendors supply little or no 
data or only information they feel supports the purchase of their 
products. As it becomes increasingly difficult to afford all digital 
content, librarians must be able to measure digital use of e-journals 
and books in order to make the best purchasing decisions for their 
institutions. Librarians must develop their own solutions as well as 
solutions in collaboration with publishers so that better evaluation of 
digital content use can occur.
NO ID: 483
UL http://www.istl.org/00-winter/article1.html

RT Journal
ID 3364
A1 Metz,Paul
T1 Principles of Selection for Electronic Resources
JF Library Trends
YR 2000
VO 48
IS 4
SP 711
OP 728
AB THE AVAILABILITY IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT OF scholarly and scientific 
literatures and other forms of information relevant to the needs of 
library users has profoundly altered the challenges faced by collection 
managers. Although the traditional goals of achieving quality, 
relevance, and balance at a fair price still animate most collection-
development efforts,judgments about these attributes of resources have 
become more ambiguous. The traditional standards have also beenjoined 
by new and highly important criteria which include the definition of 
the allowable user group and the purposes for which use will be 
permitted, multi-faceted concerns about the functionality of resources, 
and concerns about the availability of permanent archives. Drawing 
heavily on the ideas of the multi-library consortia, which have grown 
up partly in response to the advent of electronic resources, librarians 
have devised new criteria and means of assessing resources against them 
so that cost-effective acquisitions can be made in the new marketplace.
NO ID: 714
UL http://wilsontxt.hwwilson.com/pdffull/01862/mkrz7/dsv.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3363
A1 Metz,Paul
T1 Thirteen steps to avoiding bad luck in a serials cancellation 
project
JF The Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 1992
VO 18
IS Maycharts. 0099-1333
SP 76
OP 82
K1 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
K1 Technical college libraries Serial publications.
K1 Serial publications Subscriptions
NO ID: 181

RT Journal
ID 3362
A1 Metz,Paul
T1 Electronic journals from a collection manager's point of view
JF Serials Review
YR 1991
VO 17
IS 40098-7913
SP 82
OP 83
K1 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
K1 Electronic journals.
K1 Technical college libraries Collection development
NO ID: 182

RT Journal
ID 3365
A1 Metz,Paul
A1 Armstrong,E. Alan
A1 Beagle,Dave
T1 A standardized form for evaluation and description of electronic 
resources under consideration by the Virginia Tech University Libraries
JF Technicalities
YR 1998
VO 18
IS 100272-0884
SP 9
OP 10
K1 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
K1 Information systems Cataloging.
K1 Technical college libraries Cataloging
NO ID: 179

RT Journal
ID 3366
A1 Metz,Paul
A1 Litchfield,Charles A.
T1 Measuring collections use at Virginia Tech
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1988
VO 49
IS November
SP 501
OP 513+
K1 Use studies Technical college university libraries data on 
circulation in-house use current periodicals journals
NO ID: 193

RT Journal
ID 3367
A1 Metz,Paul
A1 Stemmer,John K.
T1 A reputational study of academic publishers
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1996
VO 57
IS Maycharts. 0010-0870
SP 234
OP 247
K1 Surveys Collection development.
K1 College and university libraries Collection development.
K1 Scholarly publishing Evaluation
NO ID: 180

RT Book, Section
ID 3368
A1 Michold,U.
A1 Cummins,M.
A1 Watson,J. M.
A1 Holmquist,J.
A1 Shobbrook,R.
T1 Library Information Services
YR 1995
SP 207
OP 228
K1 Many non-commercial bibliographic resources in astronomy available 
on the Internet
NO ID: 175
A2 Egret,D.
A2 Albrecht,M. A.
T2 Information & On-Line Data in Astronomy
PB Kluwer Academic

RT Journal
ID 3369
A1 Milheim,William D.
T1 Interactivity and computer based instruction
JF Journal of Educational Technology Systems
JO J.Educ.Technol.Syst.
YR 1996
VO 29
IS 3
SP 225
OP 233
AB Design and development of effective computer based instruction. 
Describes the instructional component, and its overall purpose for 
various learning environments and benefits.
NO ID: 75

RT Journal
ID 3370
A1 Miller,Jeannie P.
A1 Stringer-hye,Richard
T1 Improved access to engineering society technical papers
JF Reference Services Review
YR 1995
IS fall
SP 63
OP 67
AB To improve access to engineering technical papers, they initiated a 
project that included the following objects. Consolidate paper indexes 
to engineering society technical papers in a central location. Create a 
finding guide to engineering society technical papers customized to the 
needs of a large research library. Improve shelving procedures for 
technical papers, including maintenance of paper number order, suitable 
binding, and uniform placement of labels.
NO ID: 76

RT Journal
ID 3371
A1 Miller,Kathy
T1 When You Reach Out, Everybody Wins
JF Computers In Libraries
YR 2000
VO 20
IS 8
SP 6
AB Editors introduction to the issue, which deals with proactive 
outreach activities.
NO ID: 322
UL http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/sep00/ednotes.htm

RT Journal
ID 3372
A1 Miller,Ruth H.
T1 Electronic Resources and academic libraries, 1980-2000: A historical 
perspective
JF Library Trends
YR 2000
VO 48
IS 4
SP 645
OP 670
AB ABSTRACT -- OVER THE PAST TWENTY YEARS, ACADEMIC COLLECTION 
DEVELOPMENT specialists have dealt with dramatic changes, brought about 
by decreasing purchasing power and the growing importance of electronic 
resources. Throughout this period, collection managers have rethought 
their efforts and revised criteria for the selection of materials in 
new formats while also maintaining traditional collections. Looking 
back over this period may help provide perspective for dealing with the 
next stages of change.
NO ID: 720

RT Journal
ID 3373
A1 Miller,William
T1 The Library as a place: tradition and evolution
JF Library Issues
YR 2002
VO 22
IS 3
AB Is the library, as a physical entity on academic campuses, passé? Is 
it becoming redundant in today’s electronic environment? It might be 
tempting to wish that this were so, from a budgetary perspective. It is 
indeed expensive to maintain physical libraries, which constitute 
anywhere from 3 to 6 percent of an institution’s budget. A recent 
article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, entitled “The Deserted 
Library,” implies that electronic services are making actual libraries 
redundant, and that libraries, desperate for traffic, are resorting to 
gimmicks such as coffee bars to boost attendance, “as students work 
online, [and] reading rooms empty out.” This article sensationalizes 
and generalizes anecdotal information from a handful of libraries, so 
it could hardly be considered a definitive study of the issue, and many 
librarians have been quick to point out that their figures do not bear 
out the article’s contentions. Considering how intently librarians have 
attempted to drive services out of their libraries in order to make 
them more readily accessible online, in people’s homes and offices, it 
would be remarkable if foot traffic were not down in the most 
electronically accessible libraries. Nevertheless, further anecdotal 
evidence suggests that many libraries are experiencing as much in-
person use as ever, despite electronic reserves, submission of 
reference questions online, and external availability of the full text 
of thousands of journal titles.
NO ID: 577
UL http://www.libraryissues.com/pub/LI220003.asp

RT Journal
ID 3374
A1 Moed,Henk F.
T1 The impact-factors debate: the ISI's uses and limits
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2002
VO 415
IS 6873
SP 731
OP 732
AB Sir – Your Opinion article "Errors in Citation Statistics" (Nature 
415, 101; 2002) identified how journal impact factors compiled by the 
Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) are sometimes included as 
variables in mathematical formulae and directly influence funding 
decisions by individual research departments. Such use is inappropriate 
and counterproductive. In addition, the understandably negative 
reactions of the scientific community towards this type of use mask the 
great potential of bibliometric methods.
NO ID: 705
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v415/n6873/full/415731a_fs.html

RT Journal
ID 3375
A1 Mohler,Beth A.
T1 Citation Analysis as an Assessment Tool
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2005
VO 25
IS 4
SP 57
OP 64
AB This paperwill briefly discuss the results of a citation analysis of 
freshman engineering bibliographies conducted at Wichita State 
University. The results of that study were then used by the engineering 
librarian to assess the effectiveness of the bibliographic instruction 
given to the students. Changes were made in the content and method of 
instruction based on the results. Implications for future assessment 
are given.
NO ID: 833

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3376
A1 Montgomery,Carol Hansen
A1 Sparks,JoAnne L.
T1 Framework for Assessing the Impact of an Electronic Journal 
Collection on Library Costs and Staffing Patterns
YR 2000
AB Much has been written about the economic impact of electronic 
publishing on publishers. There has also been considerable discussion 
of library costs associated with the various methods of purchasing 
electronic publications. This paper addresses another important 
organizational impact of the migration to electronic journals that has 
heretofore received little attention in the literature: the changes in 
the library's operational costs associated with shifts in staffing, 
access to content (resources and materials), space and equipment. In 
1998 the W.W. Hagerty Library of Drexel University made migration to an 
electronic journal collection as quickly as possible a key component of 
its strategic plan. If a journal is available electronically, only the 
electronic version is purchased; the sole exceptions are (1) when the 
electronic journal lacks an important feature of the print version 
(e.g., advertisements in business or fashion journals) and (2) when the 
journal is part of the browsing collection (e.g., Scientific American). 
With the year 2000 renewals, Hagerty’s journal collection consists of 
953 print subscriptions and 4,951 electronic journals. A dramatic 
transformation in staff workload is the most immediate impact on 
library operations, but space, equipment, and even supply needs are 
affected. Some of these changes are obvious and predictable; others are 
not. This paper describes the changes experienced so far in the Drexel 
Library. The goal is to develop a framework for assessing these shifts 
in personnel and costs that can be used for planning and budgeting. The 
paper presents trends in library statistics and preliminary estimates 
of some actual cost differences between the print and electronic model.
NO ID: 224
T2 Economics and Usage of Digital Library Collections - Conference
PP Ann Arbor, MI
UL http://www.si.umich.edu/PEAK-2000/montgomery.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3377
A1 Mooney,Carolyn J.
T1 Efforts to cut amount of 'trivial' scholarship win new backing from 
many academics
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 1991
VO 37
IS 36
SP a1
AB Criticism that academics spend too much time publishing too much 
research of little value. New efforts to emphasize quality of research 
over quantity.
NO ID: 77

RT Journal
ID 3378
A1 Moore,Gordon E.
T1 The microprocessor: Engine of the technology revolution
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 23 pages.
SP 112
OP 114
K1 Computer industry
K1 Microprocessors
K1 History
K1 Applications
K1 World Wide Web
K1 Technological change
K1 Future
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (5230) Hardware
K1 (8651) Computer industry
AB When Intel was founded in 1968, the goal was to make semiconductor 
memory practical. Intel engineer Ted Hoff proposed a CPU chip that was 
actually a new class of semiconductor drive. The 4004 microcomputer 
set, the first commercial microprocessor, was introduced for general 
sale at the end of 1971. The small, $200 chip delivered as much 
computing power as the first electronic computer, ENIAC, 25 years 
earlier. This single invention revolutionized the way computers are 
designed and applied. The IBM decision to chose Intel for its first PC 
in 1980 would change Intel and the industry. The power of today's 
desktop PC has enabled increasingly complex applications. One of the 
hottest new areas is hybrid applications using computing power to make 
up for lack of bandwidth by storing the complex content at the PC, 
while updated and interactive content is accessed via the Internet. In 
the near future, one can expect the complete integration of audio, 
video, and conferencing capabilities with the World Wide Web.
NO ID: 101

RT Journal
ID 3379
A1 Moore,John W.
T1 Ownership of information
JF Journal of chemical education
JO J.Chem.Educ.
YR 2000
VO 77
IS 2
SP 141
AB As teachers of chemistry, we deal with information, knowledge, and, 
if we are fortunate, even wisdom. An important part of what we do 
involves giving students access to information and devising better ways 
to help them assimilate it. Beyond that, we can help them gain 
knowledge and understanding. Ultimately we hope that the knowledge they 
gain will help them to make wise choices about their own and society's 
collective futures.
NO ID: 257
UL http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/2000/Feb/abs141.html

RT Journal
ID 3380
A1 Morris,Sally
T1 Open access and not-for-profit publishers
JF Nature (Web Focus)
YR 2004
FD March 25
AB It is no accident that much experimentation with the Open Access 
journals model, where costs are covered by payments made on behalf of 
the author rather than on behalf of the reader, is being carried out by 
learned societies and other not-for-profit publishers. Their charitable 
status — and the reason they are therefore exempt from paying taxes — 
stems from their mission to develop and support their discipline, 
through research, dissemination and public education2. Clearly, 
providing free access to research papers, and recovering the costs in 
some other way, would be an excellent means to achieve these 
objectives.
NO ID: 645
UL http://www.nature.com/nature/focus/accessdebate/2.html

RT Journal
ID 3381
A1 Morris-Knower,James
T1 Phyllostachys Aurea -- Didn't he Work for Socrates? Reference Work 
in Science Libraries by Librarians Who Are Not Scientists
JF Reference Librarian
YR 2001
VO 72
SP 155
OP 169
NO ID: 265

RT Journal
ID 3382
A1 Morse,David H.
A1 Clintworth,William A.
T1 Comparing Patterns of Print and Electronic Journal Use in an 
Academic Health Science Library
JF Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship
YR 2000
IS 28 (Fall)
AB A study was undertaken in an academic biomedical library setting to 
compare the usage of a matched set of biomedical literature available 
to users both in print and on the web. The study results showed that 
for journal volumes in the study subset (the 1998 volumes of 194 
titles), users accessed the electronic versions more than ten times as 
often as the print versions during the six-month study period. The 
results further revealed a remarkably similar usage curve in the print 
and electronic data, with just 20% of titles accounting for nearly 60% 
of usage in both study sets. Conversely, the bottom 40% of ranked 
titles in both the print and electronic study sets accounted for just 
9% of total usage. Studies like this one demonstrate the overwhelming 
preference of users for electronic access when it is available to them, 
especially when they can link directly from databases to the full text 
of the articles indexed. They indicate as well that the large spread in 
usage levels between titles, which librarians have long observed in the 
print domain, is being duplicated in the electronic one.
NO ID: 223
UL http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/00-fall/refereed.html

RT Journal
ID 3383
A1 Mosley,Pixey Anne
T1 Engineers and librarians: how do they interact?
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1995
VO 15
IS 1
SP 51
OP 61
AB Based on a study conducted by Louisiana State University (LSU) in 
october 1993. Investigates the interpersonal skills aspects of 
communications between librarians and engineering personnel. Survey 
responses were used to evaluate interaction styles and potential 
communication barriers, as seen by the librarian. The results indicate 
potential for library awareness problems and communication 
difficulties. However, these problems can be overcome.
NO ID: 78

RT Journal
ID 3384
A1 Mount,Ellis
A1 Fasana,Paul
T1 An Approach to the Measurement of Use and Cost of a Large Academic 
Research Library System: A Report of a Study Done at Columbia 
University Libraries
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1972
FD May
VO 33
IS 3
SP 199
OP 211
K1 College Libraries
K1 Cost Effectiveness
K1 Costs
K1 Library Surveys
K1 Research Libraries
K1 Instruction
K1 Library Expenditures
K1 Research
K1 Use Studies
AB A description of the methodology used in collecting performance data 
in a large academic research library is given. Twelve types of surveys 
used to measure and evaluate users, services, and materials were 
developed. Costs of providing research services were found to be 64 
percent versus 36 percent for instructional purposes (1 reference) 
(Author/SJ)
NO EJ059365; Language not available May 72 199 197205 Journal Article 
(CIJE) a LI502238 CIJOCT1972; ID: 392

RT Journal
ID 3385
A1 Murov,Steven
T1 Exploring Chemistry Resources on the Internet
JF Journal of chemical education
JO J.Chem.Educ.
YR 2001
VO 78
IS 10
SP 1429
OP 1432
AB The Internet has rapidly emerged as an important resource of 
chemistry information. Discovering the scope of the information 
available and how to find it should be a part of the undergraduate 
education of every chemistry student. Interesting, challenging, and 
relevant searches on the Internet motivate students to gain navigation 
experience while (it is hoped!) increasing their desire to learn 
chemistry. A variety of investigations are suggested to introduce 
students to different search techniques and reinforce and supplement 
their knowledge of chemistry. As a result of performing the exercises, 
students should have a good sense of the role the Internet can play in 
their chemistry literature searches.
NO ID: 574
UL http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/2001/Oct/abs1429.html

RT Journal
ID 3386
A1 Murphy,Janet
T1 Information-Seeking Habits of Environmental Scientists: A Study of 
Interdisciplinary Scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency in 
Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2005
IS 38
SP 1
OP 9
AB This study describes a questionnaire survey of interdisciplinary 
scientists conducting research at The U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The survey was 
conducted to gain a clearer picture of how the interdisciplinary 
scientist seeks information, and in particular how the 
interdisciplinary scientist manages his/her time in regard to 
information-gathering tasks. Results indicate that many participants 
have at least some difficulty in keeping up with research in their 
field(s) of study in regard to time. As a result, many participants do 
at least some of their information-gathering in their off-time or 
delegate certain research responsibilities to others.
NO ID: 843
UL http://www.istl.org/03-summer/refereed.html

RT Journal
ID 3387
A1 Murray,Royce W.
T1 The Size of Future Science Libraries
JF Analytical Chemistry
JO Anal.Chem.
YR 2001
VO 73
IS 17
SP 461A
AB Editorial. The primary functions of a chemistry library are to 
provide user access to chemistry texts, current and back (archival) 
issues of journals, and space for studying such materials. A creeping 
issue in academic institutions—galloping in some, like mine—is the 
amount of space that is needed for these functions. The issue is even 
more complex if chemistry holdings are combined with those of other 
science disciplines.... I believe that some of the existing libraries 
in any academic or national system must resolve to be a keeper of the 
paper issues, sharing their archive with others on a fee basis. A 
general abandonment of the paper archiving of hard-won scientific 
knowledge seems premature at this time and could be courting disaster. 
Thanks to the Internet, along with practicing scholars, editors, and 
publishers, science librarians live in interesting times.
NO ID: 878
UL http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/article.cgi/ancham-
a/0000/73/i17/html/editorial.html

RT Journal
ID 3388
A1 Musser,Linda R.
A1 Conkling,Thomas W.
T1 Characteristcs of engineering citations
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1996
VO 15
IS 4
AB Current snapshot of the materials being cited in a wide cross 
section of engineering is presented in this paper. The study involved 
analyzing nearly 5000 citations taken from a representative selection 
of scholarly journals. Data can be viewed as a benchmark as to the 
types of materials currently being used by a wide range of engineers 
engaged in research as well as being useful in collection management 
decisions.
NO ID: 79

RT Journal
ID 3389
A1 Musser,Linda R.
A1 Conkling,Thomas W.
T1 Characteristics of Engineering Citations
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 1996
FD 1996
VO 15
IS 4
SP 41
OP 49
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Engineering
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Books
K1 Conference Papers
K1 Use Studies
AB An analysis of 4,780 citations taken from scholarly journals in 16 
areas of engineering showed that journals are cited 53% of the time; 
electrical engineering literature has the shortest "half-life"; and 
literature types age at different rates for engineering researchers, 
with books having the longest useful lives and conference papers the 
shortest. (PEN)
NO EJ528094; 0194-262X(1996)15:42.0.TX;2-1 Journal availability: The 
Haworth Press, Inc., 10 Alice St., Binghamton, NY 13904-1580. English 
0194-262X 1996 41 1996 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR533295 CIJDEC1996 143 
Reports--Research 080 Journal Articles; ID: 404

RT Journal
ID 3390
A1 Napp,John B.
T1 Survey of Library Services at Engineering News Record's Top 500 
Design Firms: Implications for Engineering Education
JF Journal of Engineering Education
JO J Eng Educ
YR 2004
FD July
VO 93
IS 3
SP 247
OP 252
AB This paper reports on the findings of a national survey of the 
library services available at Engineering News Record's Top 500 Designs 
Firms. In mid-October 2002, a survey was mailed to all 500 firms. The 
survey was in two parts. One part was to be completed by a principal in 
the firm. The second part was to be completed by the degreed librarian 
(holding a Masters in Library Science or its equivalent) if the firm 
employed one. The findings indicated that 74.4 percent of responding 
design firms do not employ a degreed librarian. In 79 percent of those 
firms, engineers obtain information on their own. This situation, along 
with other results, seems to suggest that more information literacy 
instruction may need to be included in the engineering curriculum.
NO ID: 870
UL 
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3886/is_200407/ai_n9427641

RT Report
ID 3391
A1 Needham,P. A. S.
T1 The MAGiC Project : Managing Access to Grey Literature Collections : 
Final Report : EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
YR 2002
FD October
SP 10
AB In the last few years there has been a significant rise in use of 
the Internet, with the result that the engineering community has begun 
to enjoy enhanced access to electronic information resources. However, 
while major collections of science and technology journals from 
mainstream publishers are now available electronically, comparatively 
little attention has been given to grey literature such as technical 
reports. Yet it is often the report – with its greater technical detail 
and rapid dissemination – rather than the refereed journal article, 
which is the formal information medium favoured by the engineering 
community. In the United States, the present administration is making 
strenuous attempts to promote the dissemination of federally funded 
research, and report literature from agencies such as NASA and the 
Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation is now 
readily available on the Internet. In the UK, apart from the 
substantial holdings of the British Library, major collections of 
technical reports tend to be scattered across academia, government and 
industry. These resources are invariably difficult to identify, locate 
and access.
NO ID: 877
PP Cranfield, Bedfordshire, UK
T3 Tertiary The MAGiC Project : Managing Access to Grey Literature 
Collections : Final Report : EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
UL http://www.bl.uk/about/cooperation/pdf/report22execsumm.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3392
A1 Nelson,Theodor Holm
T1 Crush and crash: Logic of a terrible tomorrow
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 22 pages.
SP 90
OP 91
K1 Population growth
K1 Social change
K1 Social policy
K1 Future
K1 (1200) Social policy
AB The human race will reach a population peak sometime in the future, 
but the number is not known. It would be ideal if a certain population 
maximum could be hit and then level off. Working backward from the 
assumption that at some point a population limit will be reached, then 
a scenario must be set for the downturn. Two things can make people 
fewer: reduced birth rate and increased death. Circumstances, such as 
joblessness, inflation, crowding, and refugees, will reduce the birth 
rate among the impoverished, which is where the birth rate is 
increasing. Disease and killing increase the death rate. If the forces 
so far outlined are containable, a moderate population scaleback might 
work, holding the numbers of the poor in check by a sustainable, 
persistent system of misery and killing by a constant factor. This 
scenario seems unlikely. Maintaining constant factors in social systems 
generally requires negative feedback. Violence and starvation tend to 
have positive-feedback pathways, for reasons that are well known.
NO ID: 116

RT Journal
ID 3393
A1 Nevill-Manning,Craig
T1 The biological digital library
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 2001
VO 44
IS 5
SP 41
OP 42
AB If the human genome is the book of life, then the data necessary to 
make sense of it is the library of life. Rather than a traditional 
library of books, it is a library of microbial, plant, and animal 
genomes, of 3D protein models, of experimental data, and literature. 
This information is digital by necessity; the time when all known gene 
sequences could be published on paper is over. The dozens of gigabytes 
of sequence and structure will likely never touch paper again—it is 
truly a digital library. How should we deal with this enormous, 
heterogeneous mass of data? What tools will librarians need to curate 
it? Who will interpret the data, and how will they access it?
NO ID: 769
UL http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/374308.374335

RT Journal
ID 3394
A1 Newby,Jill
T1 An Emerging Picture of Mathematicians’ Use of Electronic Resources: 
The Effect of Withdrawal of Older Print Volumes
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2005
VO 25
IS 4
SP 65
OP 85
AB This study presents the results of an e-mail survey of mathematics 
faculty, instructors and graduate students concerning the effect of the 
withdrawal of print volumes of core mathematics journals from the 
University of Arizona Science-Engineering Library that are available 
through JSTOR. Reported use and preferences for access of these core 
mathematics journals are given. Comments are included from those 
mathematicians who reported being affected by the removal of print 
journals from the library in the context of assumptions about how 
mathematicians locate and use information. Results of this study 
reiterate the results of the previous studies on the preferences and 
usage of electronic resources. In this regard, the responses of the 
University of Arizona mathematics community is typical of 
mathematicians elsewhere, especially at research institutions.
NO ID: 831
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v25n04_06&i=4&s=J122&v=25

RT Journal
ID 3395
A1 Nicholas,David
A1 Martin,Helen
A1 Cole,Peter
T1 The Internet: it's early days, but there are some surprises
JF ASLIB Proceedings
YR 1998
VO 50
IS 1
SP 214
OP 216
NO ID: 700

RT Book, Whole
ID 3396
A1 Nielson,Christine S.
T1 Proceedings -- 1998 Socioeconomic Dimensions of Electronic 
Publishing Workshop (Santa Barbara, CA, April 23-25, 1998)
YR 1998
AB Includes many interesting papers, such as: Carol Tenopir and Donald 
King - Designing the future of electronic journals with lessons learned 
form the past: economic and use patterns of scientific journals. G. 
Howard Burrows - Framework for scientific communication in earth and 
space science. Karla L. Hahn - Developing a picture of electronic 
publishing: A qualitative study of the ecology community. F. T. Andrews 
- Electronic Access: What IEEE Members say thay want. Aaron Bigman, 
Walter Peter - Defining the technical and Scientific "Information 
package of the future". Frederique-Anne P. Harmsze - Form and Content 
in the electronic age. Mary M. Case - Recreating publishing for the 
engineering and scientific community: the scholarly publishing and 
academic resources coalition (SPARC). R. Keith Raney - Through a glass 
Darkly: One Scientist's view. Julia Gelfand, John Leslie King - Grey 
Market Science: Research libraries, grey literature, and the 
legitimization of scientific discourse in the Internet age.
NO ID: 467
PB IEEENielson, Christine S
PP Piscataway, NJ
SN 0-7803-5101-0

RT Journal
ID 3397
A1 Nieuwenhuysen,Paul
T1 Journal citation measures: taking into account their fluctuations 
from year to year
JF J Inf Sci
JO J.Inf.Sci.
YR 1989
VO 15
IS 3
SP 175
OP 178
K1 Descriptor: Citation analysis -- Evaluation
NO BLIB89010520 Provider: OCLC; Netherlands ISSN: 0165-5515 Details: 
il. article feature article; ID: 456

RT Journal
ID 3398
A1 Nisonger,Thomas E.
T1 Use of the Journal Citation Reports for Serials Management in 
Research Libraries: An Investigation of the Effect of Self-Citation on 
Journal Rankings in Library and Information Science and Genetics
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2000
VO 61
IS 3
SP 263
OP 275
AB This article explores the use of the Institute for Scientific 
Information’s Journal Citation Reports (JCR) for journal management in 
academic libraries. The advantages and disadvantages to using JCR 
citation data for journal management are outlined, and a literature 
review summarizes reported uses of these data by libraries and 
scholars. This study researches the impact of journal self-citation on 
JCR rankings of library and information science (LIS) and genetics 
journals. The 1994 rankings by impact factor and total citations 
received were recalculated with journal self-citations removed; then 
the recalculated rankings were compared to the original rankings to 
analyze the effect of self-citations. It is concluded that librarians 
can use JCR data without correcting for journal self-citation, although 
self-citations do exert a major effect on the rankings for a small 
number of journals.
NO ID: 570
UL 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crljournal/backissues2000b/may00/c
andrlmay2000.htm

RT Book, Section
ID 3399
A1 Nisonger,Thomas E.
A1 Harter,Stephen P.
A1 Weng,Aiwei
T1 Subject relationships between cited and citing documents in library 
and information science (case of JASIS, C&RL and LJ as indexed in ERIC, 
LISA and Library literature)
YR 1992
SP 13
OP 19
K1 Descriptor: Citation analysis.
K1 Subject access -- Evaluation.
K1 Relevance judgments.
K1 Named Corp: ERIC.
K1 Title Subject: Journal of the American Society for Information 
Science.
K1 College and research libraries (Periodical)
K1 Library journal.
K1 Library & information science abstracts.
K1 Library literature (Index)
NO BLIB92013279 Provider: OCLC; bibl. 0938734695 Related Record: 
blib92013160 English analytic; ID: 445
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (55th :1992 
:Pittsburgh, Pa.). ASIS '92 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3400
A1 Noam,Eli M.
T1 Electronics and the future of the research library
YR 1997
AB Directions of information flows. When one connects in new ways, one 
also disconnects the old way. While new communications technologies are 
likely to increase both the amount and the speed at which information 
is shared, they will also weaken the traditional major institutions of 
knowledge, universities and their libraries.
NO ID: 80
T2 ACRL national conference, 1997, an essay prepared for
UL http://library.tufts.edu/~dmcdonald/acrlnoam.html

RT Journal
ID 3401
A1 Nordstrom,L. O.
T1 Applied versus basic science in the literature of plant biology: a 
bibliometric perspective
JF Scientometrics
JO Scientometrics
YR 1987
VO 12
IS 5-6
SP 381
OP 393
AB Applied and basic approaches to scientific inquiry were compared 
through a bibliometric analysis of two Canadian journals in plant 
biology. The two journals differed significantly in three bibliometric 
measures: author affiliation, number of references per article, and 
publication format of cited works.
NO ID: 479

RT Journal
ID 3402
A1 Novak,Jan Ryan
T1 Basic science reference sources : approaches for law librarians
JF Legal Reference Services Quarterly
YR 1993
VO 13
IS 1
SP 15
OP 29
AB This person wants to show that to find information in sci-tech 
literature, one does not have to know science. Science reference work 
is really a process of looking for laws, sometimes natural law, and 
sometimes man-made in the form of standards and specifications.
NO ID: 81

RT Journal
ID 3403
A1 Nowick,Elaine
A1 Jenda,Claudine Arnold
T1 Libraries Stuck in the Middle: Reactive vs. Proactive Responses to 
the Science Journal Crisis
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2004
IS 39
AB Libraries and the scholarly community share a dream of creating a 
world where scholarly articles are easily available on the Internet to 
everyone who wants them, without any fees, restrictions or barriers of 
any kind. What is preventing us from fulfilling such a noble and worthy 
goal? This paper examines selected case studies that show how libraries 
and scholars are coping with the science journal crisis. By 
highlighting responses that are innovative and proactive, this paper 
hopes to contribute to a general awareness of responses that have the 
potential for transforming the current scholarly communication process 
into an open, unimpeded, author-controlled electronic-journal based 
scholarly communication process.
NO ID: 630
UL http://www.istl.org/04-winter/article4.html

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3404
A1 Noyes,J. M.
A1 Thomas,P. J.
T1 Information overload: an overview
YR 1995
SP 6
NO ID: 93
T2 IEE Colloquium on Information Overload
PB IEE

RT Report
ID 3405
A1 OCLC,White Paper on the Information Habits of College Students
T1 How Academic Librarians Can Influence Students’ Web-Based 
Information Choices
YR 2002
FD June
AB This study concentrates on the web-based information habits of 
college students and their use of campus library websites, in 
particular, finding that college and university students look to campus 
libraries and library websites for their information needs. As 
confident and savvy users of electronic information resources, college 
students value access to accurate, up-to-date information with easily 
identifiable authors. They are aware of the shortcomings of information 
available from the web and of their needs for assistance in finding 
information in electronic or paper formats.
NO ID: 486
PP Dublin, Ohio
T3 Tertiary How Academic Librarians Can Influence Students’ Web-Based 
Information Choices
UL http://www2.oclc.org/oclc/pdf/printondemand/informationhabits.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3417
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 Why electronic publishing means people will pay different prices
JF Nature (Web Focus)
YR 2004
FD March 25
AB The open access movement may be the most prominent aspect of the 
profound ongoing evolution of scholarly communication, but it is far 
from the only one. Electronics is loosening the straitjacket of print, 
but only slowly. Technologies take time to become widely adopted, and 
sociological change even longer. Most journals are already available 
electronically, for example, but they remain largely facsimiles of 
their print cousins, and pre-publication evaluation procedures are much 
as before. Where change will be fastest is perhaps in the world of 
online access and pricing, where the economics will drive diverse and 
often controversial strategies.
NO ID: 638
UL http://www.nature.com/nature/focus/accessdebate/7.html

RT Journal
ID 3416
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 Internet pricing and the history of communications
JF Computer Networks
YR 2001
FD August
VO 36
IS 5-6
SP 493
OP 517
AB There are repeating patterns in the histories of communication 
technologies, including ordinary mail, the telegraph, the telephone, 
and the Internet. In particular, the typical story for each service is 
that quality rises, prices decrease, and usage increases to produce 
increased total revenues. At the same time, prices become simpler. The 
historical analogies of this paper suggest that the Internet will 
evolve in a similar way, towards simplicity. The schemes that aim to 
provide differentiated service levels and sophisticated pricing schemes 
are unlikely to be widely adopted. Price and quality differentiation 
are valuable tools that can provide higher revenues and increase 
utilization efficiency of a network, and thus in general increase 
social welfare. Such measures, most noticeable in airline pricing, are 
spreading to many services and products, especially high-tech ones. 
However, it appears that as communication services become less 
expensive and are used more frequently, those arguments lose out to 
customers' desire for simplicity. In practice, user preferences express 
themselves through willingness to pay more for simple pricing plans. In 
addition, there is a strong ‘threshold' effect to usage-sensitive 
billing. Even tiny charges based on utilization decrease usage 
substantially. In a rapidly growing market, it is in the service 
providers' interest to encourage usage, and that argues for simple, 
preferably flat rate, pricing. Historical evidence suggests that when 
service costs decrease, such arguments prevail over the need to operate 
a network at high utilization levels and to extract the highest 
possible revenues.
NO ID: 808
UL http://0-dx.doi.org.bianca.penlib.du.edu/10.1016/S1389-
1286(01)00188-8

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3414
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 The Rapid Evolution of Scholarly Communication
YR 2000
FD March 23, 2000
AB The thesis of this paper is that while traditional journals, even 
those available electronically, are changing slowly, there is a rapid 
evolution in scholarly communication. Usage is rapidly moving to 
electronic formats. In some areas, it appears that electronic versions 
of papers are being read about as often as the printed journal 
versions. Although there are serious difficulties in comparing figures 
from different media, the growth rates in usage of electronic scholarly 
information are sufficiently high that if they continue for a few 
years, there will be no doubt that print versions will be eclipsed. 
This paper presents some statistics on usage of print and electronic 
information. It also presents some preliminary evidence about the 
changing patterns of usage. It appears that much of the online usage 
comes from new readers (esoteric research papers assigned in 
undergraduate classes, for example) and often from places that do not 
have access to print journals. Also, the reactions to even slight 
barriers to usage suggest that even high quality scholarly information 
is seldom of crucial importance, and that readers are able to find near 
substitutes when necessary.
NO ID: 202
T2 Economics and Usage of Digital Library Collections - Conference
PP Ann Arbor, MI
UL http://www.si.umich.edu/PEAK-2000/odlyzko.pdf

RT Report
ID 3415
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 The future of scientific communication
YR 2000
AB A brief overview is presented of the ongoing evolution of scientific 
communication, together with some speculations about the future. Policy 
implications of the anticipated developments are discussed. 1. 
Introduction -- Scientific communication is a multi-faceted subject 
that is undergoing a profound transformation. Doing justice to it in a 
few pages is impossible, so in this note I only summarize some of the 
key points from my own papers in this area. Those papers provide more 
detailed data and arguments, as well as references to the literature 
that is available. (published in the report Access to Publicly Financed 
Research: The Global Research Village III, pp. 273-278)
NO ID: 727
T3 Tertiary The future of scientific communication
UL http://www.dtc.umn.edu/~odlyzko/doc/future.scientific.comm.pdf

RT Report
ID 3412
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 Competition and cooperation: Libraries and publishers in the 
transition to electronic scholarly journals
YR 1999
FD January 19
AB The conversion of scholarly journals to digital format is proceeding 
rapidly, especially for those from large commercial and learned society 
publishers. This conversion offers the best hope for survival for such 
publishers. The infamous "journal crisis" is more of a library cost 
crisis than a publisher pricing problem, with internal library costs 
much higher than the amount spent on purchasing books and journals. 
Therefore publishers may be able to retain or even increase their 
revenues and profits, while at the same time providing a superior 
service. To do this, they will have to take over many of the function 
of libraries, and they can do that only in the digital domain. This 
paper examines publishers' strategies, how they are likely to evolve, 
and how they will affect libraries.
NO ID: 156
PP Florham Park, NJ 07932-0971
T3 Tertiary Competition and cooperation: Libraries and publishers in 
the transition to electronic scholarly journals

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3413
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 The evolution of electronic scholarly communication
YR 1999
FD January 17
VO To Appear
AB Scholarly communication is in the early stages of a fascinating and 
far-reaching transformation made possible by the computing and 
communications revolution. Much has been said and written about this 
transformation already, and my conference lecture was based on papers 
that have been published or are in the process of publication. 
Therefore in this note I will avoid duplication and only summarize some 
key points and provide a list of references. That the references are 
overwhelmingly to my own papers is not a claim to originality, and 
simply reflects where various quotes, estimates, and predictions come 
from. Those papers contain extensive references to the pioneering work 
of many other scholars who have worked in this area. Additional 
comprehensive references and treatments of other parts of scholarly 
publishing can be found in the collections [EkmanQ, PeekN].
NO ID: 164
T2 Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Geoscience 
Information
UL http://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/evolution.communications.txt

RT Journal
ID 3411
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 The Economics of Electronic Journals
JF Journal of Electronic Publishing
YR 1998
VO 4
IS 1
AB Can electronic publications be operated at much lower costs than 
print journals, and still provide all the services that scholars 
require? That key question is still in dispute. Available evidence 
shows that much-less-expensive journals are possible on the Net. It is 
probable that such journals will dominate in the area of basic 
scholarly publishing. However, the transition is likely to be 
complicated, since the scholarly publishing business is full of inertia 
and perverse economic incentives.
NO ID: 168
UL http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/04-01/odlyzko.html 
http://www.firstmonday.dk/

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3409
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 The slow evolution of electronic publishing
YR 1997
SP 4
OP 18
AB How will scholarly publishing evolve? The history of other 
technological innovations suggests the shift to electronic publications 
will be rapid, but fundamental changes in the nature of scholarly 
communications will be much slower.
NO ID: 165
A2 Meadows,A. J.
A2 Rowland,F.
T2 Electronic Publishing '97 : New Models and Opportunities
PB ICCC Press
UL 
http://www.research.att.com/~amohttp://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/sl
ow.evolution.txt/doc/slow.evolution.txt

RT Journal
ID 3410
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 Silicon dreams and silicon bricks: the continuing evolution of 
libraries
JF Library Trends
YR 1997
VO 46
IS 1 (Summer)
SP 152
OP 167
AB Communication and computing technologies are leading to "a mixture 
of excitement, nervous anxiety, and paranoia" among librarians [Young]. 
It is widely expected that substantial changes are imminent. The Benton 
Foundation report, "Buildings, Books, and Bytes: Libraries and 
Communities in the New Digital Age" [Benton] is a valuable snapshot of 
library leaders' current thinking about their role, and also of the 
public's views of libraries. It helps to discuss it along with two 
other recent publications about libraries, the special issue of 
Daedalus entitled "Books, Bricks, and Bytes" [Daedalus], and the book 
"Future Libraries: Dreams, Madness, & Reality" by Walt Crawford and 
Michael Gorman [CrawfordG]. I will present just a few impressions 
gleaned from reading these works.
NO ID: 167
UL http://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/silicon.dreams.txt

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3407
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 The bumpy road of electronic commerce
YR 1996
SP 378
OP 389
AB Abstract: Electronic commerce is widely expected to promote 
``friction-free'' capitalism, with consumers sending software agents to 
scour the Net for the best deals. Many distribution chains will indeed 
be simplified and costs substantially reduced. However, we are also 
likely to see the creation of artificial barriers in electronic 
commerce, designed by sellers to extract more value from consumers. 
Frequent flyer mileage plans and the bundling of software into suites 
are just two examples of the marketing schemes that are likely to 
proliferate. It appears that there will be much less a la carte selling 
of individual items than is commonly expected, and more subscription 
plans. Therefore many current development plans should be redirected. 
Electronic commerce is likely to be even more exasperating to consumers 
than current airline pricing, and will be even further removed from the 
common conception of a ``just price.'' As a result, there are likely to 
be more attempts to introduce government regulation into electronic 
commerce.
NO ID: 170
T2 WebNet 96 - World Conf. Web Society Proceedings
PB AACE
UL http://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/bumpy.road.txt

RT Journal
ID 3408
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 On the road to electronic publishing
JF Euromath Bulletin
YR 1996
VO 2
IS 1
SP 49
OP 60
AB Publishing is moving rapidly into the digital age. However, the 
transition has just started, many players are reluctant participants, 
and neither the final shape of the industry nor the path there are 
clear. It is certain that evolution could be much faster, and great 
increases in efficiency and effectiveness of communication could be 
achieved. As a simple example, little of the older printed material is 
being digitized, although in most scientific and technological areas, 
all the published material could be made available in electronic form 
for under 5% of the annual world-wide spending for journals in those 
areas. As another example, Mike Lesk has pointed out that the costs of 
just the buildings of the new British Library in London and the new 
French National Library in Paris are two or three times higher than the 
costs of converting their book collections to a digital format. In a 
more rational world, the money going into bricks and mortar would have 
gone into scanning the books, which would have provided much more rapid 
and convenient access to the data for scholars. The physical volumes 
themselves could be housed in cheap warehouses, for the rare occasions 
when they might have to be consulted. However, user resistance to new 
media, copyright constraints, and the politicians' and the public's 
liking for visible edifices and for solid books make it hard to take 
that step.
NO ID: 171
UL http://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/tragic.loss.update

RT Journal
ID 3406
A1 Odlyzko,Andrew
T1 Tragic loss or good riddance? The impending demise of traditional 
scholarly journals
JF International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
YR 1995
VO 42
SP 71
OP 122
AB Traditional printed journals are a familiar and comfortable aspect 
of scholarly work. They have been the primary means of communicating 
research results, and as such have performed an invaluable service. 
However, they are an awkward artifact, although a highly developed one, 
of the print technology that was the only means available over the last 
few centuries for large-scale communication. The growth of the 
scholarly literature, together with the rapidly increasing power and 
availability of electronic technology, are creating tremendous 
pressures on journals. The purpose of this article is to give a broad 
picture of these pressures and their likely outcome, and to argue that 
the coming changes may be abrupt.
NO ID: 172
UL http://www.research.att.com/~amo/doc/tragic.loss.txt

RT Book, Whole
ID 3418
A1 Ohio,State Library of
A1 Tenney,H. Baird
T1 Marketing and Libraries Do Mix: A Handbook for Libraries and 
Information Centers
YR 1993
NO ID: 323
PB State Library of Ohio
PP Columbus, Ohio

RT Journal
ID 3421
A1 Okerson,Ann
T1 Asteroids, Moore's Law, and the Star Alliance
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 5
SP 280
OP 285
AB Very interesting article and thoughts.
NO ID: 599

RT Journal
ID 3420
A1 Okerson,Ann
T1 Are We There Yet? Online E-Resources Ten Years After
JF Library Trends
YR 2000
VO 48
IS 4
SP 671
OP 693
AB Addresses the trends regarding electronic resources and publishing 
on the Internet. Weaknesses in the print system of publication; Changes 
of the 1990s; Themes that will face the international educational and 
research communities for the years 2000 through 2005; Discussion on 
copyright and licensing.
NO ID: 716
UL http://0-
search.epnet.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&
an=3595912

RT Book, Section
ID 3419
A1 Okerson,Ann
T1 In Today's E-information Marketplace: Am I a Swan or Ungainly 
Duckling?
YR 1998
VO ASP Conference Series, Vol. 153; ASP Conference Series, Vol. 153
AB The various electronic media transform the way in which authors 
create their works and readers read and use them in their study, 
research and publication. Those profound changes are mirrored by 
immense changes in the back rooms of librarians and information 
specialists who now deal with a radically different environment for 
decision-making and access choices. This opening talk will review 
characteristics of the ``new'' marketplace.
NO ID: 578
T2 Library and Information Services in Astronomy III
PB Astronomical Society of the Pacific
UL http://www.stsci.edu/stsci/meetings/lisa3/okersona.html

RT Journal
ID 3422
A1 Okerson,Ann Shumelda
T1 Buy or lease? two models for scholarly information at the end (or 
the beginning) of an era
JF Daedalus
JO Daedalus
YR 1996
VO 125
IS 4
SP 55
OP 76
AB A recent report of the US National information infrastructure 
working group on copyright imagines a world that is increasingly 
governed by licenses or contracts rather than copyright. She discusses 
the differences between copyright and contractural licensing and how it 
currently works.
NO ID: 82

RT Dissertation/Thesis
ID 3423
A1 Olaisen,Johan Leif
T1 Toward a Theory of Information Seeking Behavior Among Scientists and 
Scholars
YR 1984
SP 356
K1 LIBRARIES, NORWAY, SOCIAL SCIENTISTS
AB The purpose of this dissertation is to help achieve an understanding 
of information seeking of scientists and scholars. The main focus has 
been to analyze the faculty's information seeking in a decentralized 
Norwegian college system ('Distriktshogskolene') established in the 
1970's to offer research and studies at university level based on a 
more democratic decision process. The research methods are survey 
research (questionnaire sent to all faculty members with a response 
rate of 84% and interviews), field research (observations and 
participation), and review of the research literature. The data are 
presented by discipline, field, rank, educational background, sex, and 
tenure status. Some of the main findings are these: The context of the 
Norwegian college system and demographic variables of the population of 
faculty are an important basis for understanding information seeking. 
Our study suggests that the faculty has been able to use regional 
problems and information sources in their research projects. A majority 
ranked journals as their most important formal information source and 
citations from journals and books as their most important retrieval 
tools. Bibliographical tools, the library catalogues, and the library 
staff had little importance. A majority almost never visited other 
academic libraries, while public libraries were more frequently 
visited, and bookstores were regarded as important information outlets. 
Our study suggests a wide individual variance in the perceived 
usefulness of conferences. Our study suggests that about 60% of the 
faculty devote their time both to teaching and research-related 
activities, while about 40% seem to devote their time only to teaching-
related activities. Forty-two percent of the faculty did not publish 
anything in 1980-81, while 47% published one or two works and 11% 
published three or more works. A relatively small part of the faculty 
accounted for a large part of the total number of publications. 
Personal recommendations for the discovery and locating of documents 
and personal informal contacts during a research project were important 
for the faculty. This study suggests that there are small differences 
among the disciplines in the importance of interpersonal contacts, 
while women seem to be more dependent on interpersonal contacts than 
are men. An integrated framework for further study of information 
seeking behavior is proposed in the conclusion, based on hypothesized 
motivational factors together with interpersonal and environmental 
factors.
NO ID: 340
PB University of California, BerkeleyEditor
PP Berkeley, CA

RT Journal
ID 3424
A1 Ollerton,Jacqui
T1 Marketing Services to Mechanical Engineers
JF Aslib Information
YR 1991
VO 19
IS 2
SP 44
OP 45
K1 She notes that the "engineer is a traditional resistant user of 
libraries." By using some marketing techniques, the Information and 
Library Service unit of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers was 
able to establish itself as a key unit within the Institution
NO ID: 324

RT Journal
ID 3425
A1 Olson,Randy J.
T1 Negotiating for electronic journal indexes
JF Collection Management
YR 1995
VO 19
IS 3/4
SP 35
OP 45
AB Brigham young university, BYU, had a collection development policy 
for collecting electronic indexes. Study is as of 1992 and 1993. Looks 
at Wilson indexes, abi inform, umi periodical abstracts, iac expanded 
academic, and iac general business file.
NO ID: 83

RT Journal
ID 3426
A1 Ondrusek,Anita L.
T1 The attributes of research on end-user online searching behavior: A 
retrospective review and analysis
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2004
VO 26
IS 2
SP 221
OP 265
AB A total of 163 studies examining end-user behaviors (as reported in 
175 individual articles) were selected and analyzed for their research 
attributes. From the earliest identified study to those conducted 
before the end of 2000, recurring themes emerged, as did 
characteristics unique to particular studies. The majority of 
researchers employed nonexperimental quantitative data collection 
methods. However, a select group of qualitative studies and a few 
experimental investigations also were identified. Research designs 
combining multiple methodologies were the norm. The variables prevalent 
across studies were broadly classified into a typology under end-user 
traits, system attributes, organizational setting, task and request 
characteristics, performance outcomes and obstacles, and results 
measures. The specific behaviors that researchers concentrated upon 
most often were the end-users' searching techniques, relevance 
judgments about information they found, satisfaction with search 
results, and prior knowledge brought to bear on online searching 
assignments. Also examined were trends in publishing, geographic 
locations of field sites, databases selected for searching activities, 
and the characteristics of searcher cohorts.
NO ID: 682
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lisr.2004.01.002

RT Journal
ID 3427
A1 Oppenheim,Charles
A1 Greenhalgh,Clare
A1 Rowland,Fytton
T1 The Future of Scholarly Journal Publishing
JF Journal of Documentation
YR 2000
FD Jul
VO 56
IS 4
SP 361
OP 398
K1 Electronic Publishing
K1 Internet
K1 Publishing Industry
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Scholarly Writing
K1 Foreign Countries
K1 Futures (of Society)
K1 Information Dissemination
K1 Online Systems
K1 Publications
K1 Scholarly Communication
K1 Surveys
AB Surveys the recent literature on scholarly publishing and its 
conversion to the electronic medium. Presents results of a 
questionnaire survey of the United Kingdom-based scholarly publishing 
industry. Results suggest publishers are moving quickly towards use of 
the Internet as a major medium for distribution, though they do not 
expect an early print publication. Perceived future difficulties are 
outlined. (Contains 119 references.) (AEF)
NO EJ618371; 0022-0418(200007)56:42.0.TX;2-7 Special issue in honour of 
A.J. (Jack) Meadows. English 0022-0418 Jul 2000 361 200007 Journal 
Article (CIJE) a IR542612 CIJJUN2001 080 Journal Articles 143 Reports--
Research; ID: 391

RT Journal
ID 3428
A1 Oppenheim,Charles
A1 Renn,Susan P.
T1 Highly Cited Old Papers and the Reasons Why They Continue To Be 
Cited
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1978
FD Sept
VO 29
IS 5
SP 225
OP 231
K1 Citations (References)
K1 Comparative Analysis
K1 Research
K1 Error Patterns
K1 Indexes
K1 Methods
K1 Tables (Data)
AB Citations of 23 old papers in physics and physical chemistry were 
studied in 978 papers in which they appeared in 1974-1975. Using a new 
typology of reasons for citing the papers, it was determined that in 
about 60 percent of the cases, the papers are still being actively 
used.
NO EJ189205; English Sep 78 225 197809 Journal Article (CIJE) a 
IR505967 CIJFEB1979; ID: 390

RT Journal
ID 3429
A1 Oppenheim,Charles
A1 Smith,Richard
T1 Student Citation Practices in an Information Science Department
JF Education for Information
JO Educ.Inf.
YR 2001
VO 19
SP 299
OP 323
AB A study was carried out on student citation practices in the 
Department of Information Science, Loughborough University. The 
bibliographies in 60 recent final year undergraduate dissertations were 
examined and analyses of the types of materials cited and trends over 
time were carried out. In addition, a survey of second and third year 
undergraduates was undertaken to assess their attitudes towards sources 
of literature, citations and their motives for citing particular 
references. The results show a clear trend towards citing Internet 
resources and away from journal articles. Students' motives for citing 
are not dissimilar from those of academics, although there are some 
important differences in emphasis. The results show a worrying reliance 
on Internet sources rather than other electronic sources. The 
implications for libraries, and for the teaching of bibliographic 
instruction are considered.[
NO ID: 415

RT Journal
ID 3430
A1 O'Reilly,Stacy A.
A1 Wilson,Anne M.
A1 Howes,Barbara
T1 Utilization of SciFinder Scholar at an Undergraduate Institution
JF Journal of chemical education
JO J.Chem.Educ.
YR 2002
VO 79
IS 4
SP 524
OP 526
AB The use of tools to search chemical information databases continues 
to be important to science educators. The ability to perform online 
searches of Chemical Abstracts Service can have a significant impact on 
teaching and research. The implementation of SciFinder Scholar at 
Butler University has resulted in significant changes in teaching, 
student-based research, and faculty development in the Chemistry 
Department. Details of these changes in courses, student research 
projects and proposals, and the professional growth of the faculty are 
discussed.
NO ID: 573
UL http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/2002/Apr/abs524.html

RT Journal
ID 3431
A1 Osif,Bonnie
T1 International transportation literature: an analysis of citation 
patterns, availability and research implications to the transportation 
community
JF International Journal on Grey Literature
YR 2000
VO 1
IS 4
SP 149
OP 156
K1 Research
K1 Transport
K1 Technology Transfer
K1 Grey Literature
K1 Bibliography
AB Attention to infrastructure issues has increased in recent years. 
The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) 
and its reauthorization in the Transportation Efficiency Act of 1998 
(TEA 21) have focused stronger attention on the need to encourage 
innovation, identify and facilitate partnerships, identify core 
research and provide assessment criteria. This has resulted in 
increased awareness that information is key to accomplishing these 
goals. The importance of international materials is now seen as 
critical to efficient utilization of knowledge. Reports a survey of 12 
European transportation centers in nine countries during 1998. 
Information was gathered on local characteristics of researchers, areas 
of research specialization, formats and languages of resources 
used/borrowed by the researchers, local publications and their 
dissemination patterns, the utilization of US materials, and the role 
of the World Wide Web by the librarians, researchers and other staff at 
the transportation facility.
NO ID: 272

RT Journal
ID 3432
A1 Osif,Bonnie A.
T1 International transportation literature: an analysis of citation 
patterns, availability and research implications to the transportation 
community
JF International Journal on Grey Literature
YR 2000
VO 1
IS 4
SP 149
OP 156
AB Attention to infrastructure issues has increased in recent years. 
The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA)and 
its reauthorization in the Transportation Efficiency Act of 1998 (TEA 
21 ) have focused stronger attention on the need to encourage 
innovation, identify and facilitate partnerships, identify core 
research and provide assessment criteria. This has resulted in 
increased awareness that information is key to accomplishing these 
goals. The importance of international materials is now seen as 
critical to efficient utilization of knowledge. Reports a survey of 12 
European transportation centers in nine countries during 1998. 
Information was gathered on local characteristics of researchers, areas 
of research specialization, formats and languages of resources 
used/borrowed by the researchers, local publications and their 
dissemination patterns, the utilization of US materials, and the role 
of the World Wide Web by the librarians, researchers and other staff at 
the transportation facility.
NO ID: 411

RT Journal
ID 3433
A1 Osorio,Nestor L.
T1 Web sites of science-engineering libraries: an analysis of content 
and design (computer file)
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2001
FD Winter 2001article feature article
VO 29
K1 Descriptor: Web sites -- Evaluation.
K1 Internet -- Scientific and technical libraries
NO ID: 284
UL http://www.library.ucsb.edu/istl/01-winter/refereed.html

RT Journal
ID 3434
A1 Owen,Whitney J.
T1 in defense of the least publishable unit
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2004
FD February 9
VO x
IS x
SP x
AB A few months ago, I was sitting in my office, in my role as the dean 
of science at a four-year, up-and-coming college, talking with a young, 
up-and-coming faculty member about her research. We were meeting to 
talk about the syllabus for her new course, but naturally, the 
conversation wandered to her quest for tenure. Before I knew it we were 
deep into a discussion of the "least publishable unit," or, as it's 
known in academe, the LPU. In order to appear to have more publications 
on their CVs, young scholars are often advised to break their research 
down into pieces and publish those pieces in multiple articles -- i.e., 
LPU's.
NO ID: 771
UL http://chronicle.com/jobs/2004/02/2004020901c.htm

RT Journal
ID 3435
A1 Owens,Susan R.
T1 Revolution or evolution? A shift to an open-access model of 
publishing would clearly benefit science, but who should pay?
JF EMBO reports
JO EMBO Rep.
YR 2003
VO 4
IS 8
SP 741
OP 743
AB The driving force behind most scientists' careers is to achieve the 
maximum visibility for their research. Since the creation of the first 
scientific journals in the mid-seventeenth century, scientists have 
condensed their data and conclusions into a manuscript and happily 
handed this over to a publisher, who in return has printed it and 
distributed it to those willing—or whose institutes are willing—to pay 
a subscription fee. But the triple whammy of rising journal prices, an 
exploding number of journals and imploding library budgets means that 
the bulk of this work can now only be accessed by a small fraction of 
its intended audience. The arrival of the World Wide Web has the 
potential to change this reality: now that the vast majority of printed 
articles are also available in an electronic form, which is 
theoretically accessible by anyone with an interest and an internet 
connection, shouldn't all articles become free for everyone to read?
NO ID: 635
UL http://www.nature.com/cgi-
taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/embor/journal/v4/n8/full/embor913.html

RT Journal
ID 3436
A1 Pace,Andrew K.
T1 Marketing Our Strengths
JF Computers In Libraries
YR 2000
VO 20
IS 8
SP 63
OP 65
AB He basically says that librarians have never been good about 
marketing a positive professional image, but that that does not matter. 
We should market the services librarians provide locally and over the 
Internet.
NO ID: 325

RT Journal
ID 3437
A1 Pack,Thomas
A1 Pemberton,Jeff
T1 A Harbinger of Change: The Cutting Edge Library at the Los Alamos 
National Laboratory
JF Online Magazine
YR 1999
IS March
SP 34
OP 42
K1 LANL
AB Imagine a library serving approximately 10,000 employees 24 hours a 
day, seven days a week. Imagine most of those employees are physicists, 
engineers, chemists, or other scientists who often work on projects 
related to national security (such as reducing global nuclear danger). 
Now imagine the employees are spread out over forty-three square miles 
in a fairly remote, mountainous region. How would the library overcome 
the challenges of the environment to meet the extensive information 
needs of the employees? The Research Library at the Los Alamos National 
Laboratory has not only overcome the challenges and met basic needs, 
but also developed cutting-edge services and systems.
NO ID: 173
UL http://www.onlineinc.com/articles/onlinemag/pack993.html

RT Journal
ID 3438
A1 Palmer,Carole I.
T1 Information work at the boundaries of science: linking library 
services to research practices (findings of scientists at an 
interdisciplinary institute)
JF Library Trends
YR 1996
VO 45
IS fall
SP 165
OP 191
K1 information needs, research techniques - evaluation, communication 
of scientific and technical information
NO ID: 84

RT Book, Whole
ID 3439
A1 Paradis,James G.
A1 Zimmerman,Muriel L.
T1 The MIT guide to science and engineering communication
YR 1997
SP 290
K1 communication in science, communication in engineering, technical 
writing
NO ET: 1st; Q223.P33 1997; ID: 160
PB MIT Press
PP Cambridge, MA
SN 0-262-16142-7

RT Journal
ID 3440
A1 Parrish,Marilyn McKinley
T1 Deselection of inactive serials or what to do when it's already dead
JF Serials Review
YR 1996
VO 22
IS 3
SP 49
OP 59
AB Describes an evaluation tool developed for inactive serials during 
the spring semester of 1995. Provision of evaluative criteria to use 
when deselecting serials; Includes evaluation of a title in relation to 
the curriculum, research and total collection; Interdisciplinary nature 
of the title; Length of the backfile held; Uniqueness of the title.
NO ID: 708
UL http://0-dx.doi.org.bianca.penlib.du.edu/10.1016/S0098-
7913(96)90018-0

RT Journal
ID 3441
A1 Peace,A. Graham
T1 Balancing free speech and censorship: academia's response to the 
Internet
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 2003
VO 46
IS 11
SP 104
OP 109
AB Many universities do not consider the topic of censorship important 
enough to address in a formal way---but the legal and ethical risks of 
neglecting this issue should not be ignored.
NO ID: 755
UL http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=948388

RT Book, Section
ID 3442
A1 Penniman,W. David
T1 Educating the scientific/technical information specialist: 
description of the program at the Unviersity of Tennessee
YR 1998
SP 11
OP 21
NO co-published simultaneously as Science & technology libraries, 
v17(2) 1998.; ID: 219
A2 Hallmark,Julie
A2 Seidman,Ruth K.
T2 Sci/tech librarianship : education and training
PB Haworth Press
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 3443
A1 Perez-Iratxeta,Carolina
A1 Andrade,Miguel A.
T1 Worldwide scientific publishing activity
JF Science
JO Science
YR 2002
VO 297
IS 5581
SP 519
AB If we view scientific activity as an indicator of wealth, and if we 
believe that publishing activity in peer-reviewed journals is 
correlated to scientific activity, then we can take the amount of 
papers published by individuals of a nation (divided by its total 
population) as an indicator of that nation's wealth. In the case of 
scientific activity, there is the expectation that it not only reflects 
today's wealth, but also promises future wealth through the practical 
application of the scientific knowledge generated. We analyzed this 
indicator using the MEDLINE database of biomedical journal articles 
(1), which contains entries including the main address of the authors 
and the date of the publication. A first static analysis (measuring the 
papers published per inhabitant during 1996-2001) offered no surprises 
(see panel A of figure). The differences between First, Second, and 
Third Worlds are easily seen in a 10-fold difference in the amount of 
articles published per inhabitant.
NO ID: 773
UL http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/297/5581/519b

RT Journal
ID 3444
A1 Peritz,Bluma C.
A1 Sor,Dina
T1 The use of libraries by graduate students in psychology as indicated 
by citations
JF Collection Management
YR 1990
VO 12
IS 3/4
SP 11
OP 23
AB Academic dissertations. Citation analysis. Psychology literature -- 
Evaluation. Four Israeli universities. Masters theses.
NO ID: 378

RT Journal
ID 3445
A1 Peskin,Michael E.
T1 Publication and the Internet: where next?
JF APS News
YR 2005
FD April
VO 14
IS 4
SP 8
AB A part of the vision of the future of science enunciated by Vannevar 
Bush in 1945 was the ‘memex’, a machine that instantly retrieved any 
paper in the scientific literature [1]. Today, that device is at my 
disposal. When students come to my office with queries that might be 
about any topic in high-energy physics, I can put the answers in their 
hands with a few clicks of the mouse. This is the result of enormous 
effort in the past decade by many people who shared this vision, from 
the developers of the World-Wide Web to the authors of Web-accessible 
archives and search engines. It is time now to consolidate what we have 
learned and to pose clearly the next set of problems to be addressed.
NO ID: 830

RT Journal
ID 3446
A1 Peterson,Christina
A1 Kajiwara,Sanda
T1 Scientific Literacy Skills for Non-Science Librarians: Bootstrap 
Training
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 1999
IS 24
AB Adding scientific literacy to the skill set of permanent non-science 
and part-time adjunct librarians became a major focus of a staff 
development program at San Jose State University Library. The Library's 
one reference desk is busy, and librarians field questions from all 
disciplines. Changing staffing patterns in the Reference Department 
have necessitated the use of more adjuncts at the reference desk. A 
proliferation of web-based scientific information sources was 
overloading students and the librarians who serve them at Reference. In 
order to determine our most pressing training goals, we administered a 
survey to all reference personnel, discovering that librarians in the 
social sciences and humanities and adjunct librarians felt a knowledge 
deficit in chemistry, health sciences, and engineering, among other 
disciplines. The adjuncts, in particular, wanted to be brought up to 
speed in several aspects of science and technology librarianship, 
including the nature of science and its literature, typical 
undergraduate and graduate science students' information requirements, 
how to use both electronic and print sources in the sciences, and when 
to refer questions to science librarians. We put into place Bootstrap 
Training, a program for integrated groups of full-time and adjunct 
librarians. In this paper we describe an initial training-needs 
questionnaire distributed to all reference personnel, the 
implementation of a staff development program with scientific literacy 
goals, evaluation of the program, and implications for replicating the 
training in other library settings.
NO ID: 813
UL http://www.istl.org/99-fall/article3.html

RT Journal
ID 3447
A1 Petroski,Henry
T1 Buildings and Bookstacks
JF American Scientist
JO Am.Sci.
YR 1999
VO 87
IS 6
SP 499
OP 503
AB Discusses the history of the mathematics library of University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign housed in Altgeld Hall building. 
Architectural information on the building; Description of the 
mathematics library; Concept of the arrangement of the books; 
Description of the Library of Congress at the White House in Washington 
D.C. as compared with the Altgeld Hall.
NO ID: 819

RT Journal
ID 3448
A1 Pincock,Stephen
T1 Royal Soc. down on open access
JF The Scientist
YR 2004
FD March 8
AB UK's national academy says free access scientific publishing would 
increase costs -- Britain's Royal Society has given a thumbs down to 
the concept of open access publishing of scientific research, saying it 
would increase the cost of funding UK scientists, thereby potentially 
reducing the number of grants awarded. "The Royal Society wholly 
supports the widest possible dissemination of science, particularly to 
developing countries,” said the organization's vice president, John 
Enderby. “However, we are concerned that the model currently proposed 
for 'open access' journals, where scientists pay a fee for each paper 
they have published, is an unsustainable one which could also 
significantly impact on UK science funding.”
NO ID: 776
UL http://www.biomedcentral.com/news/20040308/02/

RT Journal
ID 3703
A1 Pinelli,Thomas Edward
T1 Information-Seeking habits and Practices of Engineers
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1991
VO 11
IS 3
SP 5
OP 25
AB There are many different information user communities.  The 
differences between them may be great.  Even within similar or related 
user communities there may be considerable differences among users.  
Thus, to meet the information needs of the user communities, 
information professionals must first understand the nature of the user 
community and become familiar with the information-seeking habits and 
practices of the user.

RT Journal
ID 3449
A1 Pinelli,Thomas Edward
T1 Distinguishing Engineers from Scientists - The Case for an 
Engineering Knowledge Community
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2001
VO 21
IS 3
SP 131
OP 161
AB This article makes the case for an engineering knowledge community. 
We begin by discussing the differences between science and technology.  
We next discuss the similarities and differences between engineers and 
scientists. Next, we analyze previous research into the information use 
behaviors of engineers. Finally, using the research results from the 
NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, we compare and 
contrast aerospace engineers and scientists as a means of developing 
similarities and differences between engineers and scientists in terms 
of their information-seeking behavior. The goal of this article is to 
demonstrate that engineers are not scientists and that knowledge 
production and use differ in engineering and science. We believe that 
the current model used to explain information-seeking behavior assumes 
no difference between the information-seeking of engineers and 
scientists. The distinctions between engineering and science, engineers 
and scientists and the information-seeking behaviors of engineers and 
scientists have multiple implications for providing information 
services, knowledge management, and diffusing knowledge. The message to 
libraries is “know thy customer.”
NO ID: 871
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v21n03_09&i=3%2F4&s=J122&v=21

RT Book, Section
ID 3450
A1 Pinelli,Thomas Edward
A1 Barclay,Rebecca O.
A1 Glassman,Nanci
T1 The relationship between seven variables and the use of U.S. 
government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists
YR 1991
SP 313
OP 321
K1 Descriptor: Use studies -- Technical reports
NO BLIB92006855 Provider: OCLC; charts. 0938734563 Related Record: 
blib92006375 English analytic; ID: 449
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (54th :1991 
:Washington, D.C.). ASIS '91 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Book, Section
ID 3451
A1 Pinelli,Thomas Edward
A1 Bishop,Ann P.
A1 Barclay,Rebecca O.
A1 Kennedy,John M.
T1 Information-seeking behavior of engineers
YR 1993
VO 52; 52
SP 167
OP 201
AB Engineers are an extraordinarily diverse group of professionals, but 
an attribute common to all engineers is their use of information.
NO Z1006 .E57 V.52; ID: 873
A2 Kent,Allen
T2 Encyclopedia of library and information science
PB Marcel Dekker
PP New York

RT Journal
ID 3704
A1 Poland,Jean
T1 Informal Communication Among Scientists and Engineers:  A Review of 
the Literature
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1991
VO 11
IS 3
SP 61
OP 73
AB The literature dealing with informal communication behavior among 
scientists and engineers is reviewed.  The effects new communication 
technology may have on that behavior are considered, along with 
implications for librarians.

RT Book, Whole
ID 3452
A1 Poole,Herbert
T1 Academic libraries by the year 2000: essays honoring Jerrold Orne
YR 1977
SP 205
AB A bunch of librarians try to predict the future of libraries and 
their collection development. About the only person to see greater use 
of computers was Virgil F. Massman, "Changes that will affect college 
library collection development."
NO ID: 857
PB R. R. Bowker Co.Poole, Herbert
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0835209938

RT Book, Section
ID 3453
A1 Porter,George S.
A1 Sponsler,Ed
T1 Online Journals: Utility of ToCs vs. Fulltext
YR 2001
SP 110
OP 119
AB The Caltech Library System Web site (CLSweb) has included an online 
journals list since March 1997. The number of journal Web sites 
documented in the online journals list has grown explosively over the 
last 4 years. The entries serve several purposes. Like all library 
ejournal lists, the CLSweb version provides access to licensed online 
content. In addition, free scholarly ejournals are included. Since its 
inception, the CLSweb online journals lists have included entries to 
provide access to the tables of contents (ToCs) and/or abstracts of 
journals whose subscriptions have been cancelled in the library.
NO ID: 289
A2 Thompson,Hugh A.
T2 Crossing the divide : proceedings of the Tenth National Conference 
of the Association of College and Research Libraries, March 15-18, 
2001, Denver, Colorado
PB ACRL
PP Denver, CO
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/papers01/porter.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3454
A1 Powers,Janet E.
T1 Marketing in the Special Library Environment
JF Library Trends
YR 1995
VO 43
IS 3
SP 478
OP 493
AB This is one of the articles in the issue that has a theme concerning 
marketing in libraries. Author Abstract - "Special libraries developed 
in response to a need for specific information and the emerging 
recognition that an organization with quick access to good information 
may have a competitive advantage. Marketing plans in special libraries 
integrate library services and functions with organizational goals and 
objectives, influencing the behavior and performance of the 
organization by the way information from libraries is communicated and 
used."
NO ID: 326

RT Report
ID 3455
A1 Prabha,Chandra G.
T1 Characteristics of Articles Requested through OCLC Interlibrary Loan
YR 1996
AB As the the number of periodical titles in electronic editions 
increase, and as libraries are faced with new restrictions for sharing 
articles from site-licensed periodical literature, copyright issues 
surface. Understanding the characteristics of articles users now 
request can facilitate discussion. This paper presents the attributes 
of articles sought through OCLC Interlibrary Loan. Nearly two-thirds of 
the requested articles were published within five years. Over 80% of 
the periodical source titles were sought five or fewer times a year.
NO ID: 488
PP Dublin, OH
T3 Tertiary Characteristics of Articles Requested through OCLC 
Interlibrary Loan
UL http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/arr/1996/artill.htm

RT Journal
ID 3456
A1 Prosser,David C.
T1 Between a rock and a hard place: the big squeeze for small 
publishers
JF Learned Publishing
YR 2004
VO 17
IS 1
SP 17
OP 22
AB 2003 did not start out well for the STM journals market. The 
collapse of RoweCom left many publishers wondering if they would ever 
see their money and librarians wondering if they would see the journals 
they had paid for. While the purchase of RoweCom’s European business by 
EBSCO has mitigated some of the potential loss, many publishers will 
have seen 2003 income fall below budget as not all of the money within 
RoweCom has been recovered.
NO ID: 602
UL http://www.alpsp.org/2004pdfs/htp_econpro.pdf

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3457
A1 Pudovkin,Alexander I.
A1 Garfield,Eugene
T1 Rank-Normalized Impact Factor: A way to compare journal performance 
across subject disciplines
YR 2004
SP 507
OP 515
AB It is well known that uninformed science administrators often use 
ISI's journal impact factors without taking into account the inherent 
citation characteristics of individual scientific disciplines. A rank 
normalized impact factor (rnIF) is proposed which involves use of order 
statistics for the complete set of journals within each JCR category. 
We believe the normalization procedure provides reliable and easily 
interpretable values. For any journal j, its rnIF is designated as 
rnIFj and equals (K - Rj + 1)/K, where Rj is the descending rank of 
journal j in its JCR category and K is the number of journals in the 
category. Note: JCR impact factor listings are published in descending 
order. The proposed rnIF is compared with normalized impact factors 
proposed by earlier authors. The efficacy of the rnIF is illustrated in 
the cases of seven highly-cited scientists, one each from seven 
different fields.
NO ID: 640
T2 Proceedings of the 67th ASIS&T Annual Meeting, vol. 41
UL 
http://www.garfield.library.upenn.edu/papers/ranknormalizationasist2004
published.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3458
A1 Quigley,J.
A1 Peck,D. R.
A1 Rutter,S.
A1 McKee Williams,E.
T1 Making choices: factors in the selection of information resources 
among science faculty at the University of Michigan results of a survey 
conducted July-September, 2000
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 2002
IS 34
AB We carried out a survey of 230 science faculty and researchers at 
the University of Michigan in the departments of astronomy, biology, 
chemistry, geology, mathematics, natural resources, physics, and 
statistics, seeking to learn about their information resource use and 
preferences in diverse research contexts. Results indicate that 
researchers rely largely on the same information-seeking tools in 
different research contexts. We also asked about the importance of six 
factors-speed, convenience, familiarity, currency, authoritativeness, 
reliable availability-on their information resource preferences; 
convenience and time were most frequently cited. Finally, open-ended 
questions invited respondents to comment on barriers and frustrations 
they encountered in information-seeking; themes of availability and 
access to needed material were mentioned, in addition to a wide variety 
of information retrieval difficulties.
NO ID: 344
UL http://www.istl.org/02-spring/refereed.html

RT Journal
ID 3459
A1 Quinn,Brian
T1 The McDonaldization of Academic Libraries?
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2000
VO 61
IS 3
SP 248
OP 261
AB George Ritzer, a sociologist at the University of Maryland, has 
proposed an influential thesis that suggests that many aspects of the 
fast food industry are making their way into other areas of society. 
This article explores whether his thesis, known as the McDonaldization 
thesis, is applicable to academic libraries. Specifically, it seeks to 
determine to what extent academic libraries may be considered 
McDonaldized, and if so, what effect McDonaldization may be having on 
them. It also investigates some possible alternatives to 
McDonaldization, and their implications for academic libraries.
NO ID: 699

RT Report
ID 3460
A1 Quint,Barbara
T1 Sci-Tech Not-For-Profit Publishers Commit to Limited Open Access
YR 2004
AB News Breaks from Information Today magazine -- Forty-eight of the 
nation’s and the world’s top medical and scientific societies and not-
for-profit scholarly publishers have signed the "Washington DC 
Principles for Free Access to Science" (http://www.dcprinciples.org), a 
statement proclaiming their commitment to providing free access and 
wide dissemination of published research findings. The announcement 
declared that the DC Principles represent a “needed ‘middle ground’ in 
the increasingly heated debate between those who advocate immediate 
unfettered online access to medical and scientific research findings 
and advocates of the current journal publishing system.”
NO ID: 778
T3 Tertiary Sci-Tech Not-For-Profit Publishers Commit to Limited Open 
Access
UL http://www.infotoday.com/newsbreaks/nb040322-2.shtml

RT Journal
ID 3461
A1 Ramachandran,R.
T1 The 'free access' debate
JF Frontline (India's National Magazine)
YR 2004
VO 21
IS 2
AB Open access to scientific journals is beneficial to scholars and has 
wide support as a concept, but it needs viable revenue models and great 
commitment among its promoters. LAST October, two biologists at the 
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) circulated an e-mail 
asking biologists all over the world to boycott all journals of Cell 
Press, which publishes some of the most prestigious journals in biology 
including Cell, Molecular Cell and Neuron. The call was to protest 
against the high charges of online access to these journals. According 
to the researchers, Elsevier, the owner of Cell Press, charges $90,000 
a year to provide access to six Cell Press journals over and above the 
$8 million that the university pays for e-access to its other titles. 
Last heard, while Elsevier has not relented, other universities are 
following suit.
NO ID: 787
UL http://www.frontlineonnet.com/fl2102/stories/20040130000807900.htm

RT Journal
ID 3462
A1 Rambler,Mark
T1 Do it Yourself? : A New Solution to the Journals Crisis
JF Journal of Electronic Publishing
YR 1999
VO 4
IS 3Republished with permission from Lingua Franca, The Review of 
Academic Life, published in New York. This article originally appeared 
in the December/January 1999 issue.
AB Those librarians who help you decode Dewey's decimals are becoming 
unlikely warriors at the end of the this decade. They have to. With 
large publishing conglomerates driving the prices of scholarly journals 
higher and higher, librarians find themselves spending more and more 
money to purchase fewer and fewer titles. Their constituencies are 
concerned. Scanning the stacks, professors moan; brooding over their 
budgets, the financial officers grumble. It's no wonder, then, that 
many librarians are asking: Is there a better way? If you don't like 
the way journals are being published, why not do it yourself?
NO ID: 177
UL http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/04-03/rambler.html

RT Journal
ID 3463
A1 Raney,Keith
T1 Into a glass darkly
JF Journal of Electronic Publishing
YR 1998
VO 4
IS 2
AB Electronic publication will be adopted by the scientific and 
engineering community only when it meets the needs of that community, 
overcomes the major problems with conventional publication, and offers 
new and worthwhile capabilities that exceed those of traditional 
journals. When it does that, electronic publication will deserve to be 
adopted by the professional community.
NO ID: 151

RT Journal
ID 3464
A1 Raquepau,Cynthia A.
A1 Richards,Louise M.
T1 Investigating the environment: teaching and learning with 
undergraduates in the sciences
JF Reference Services Review
YR 2002
VO 30
IS 4
SP 319
OP 323
AB Two librarian/instructors developed and taught a three-credit, 
quarter long course for undergraduates at the University of Washington, 
Seattle, USA. The course emphasized research skills in natural and 
environmental sciences. Presents a history of the course - how it came 
to be and the partnerships involved; and describe the process of 
research, design, implementation and revision involved with teaching. 
Using fluency in technology and surveys of current students, the 
researchers concluded that greater learning is achieved through a 
combination of computer technology and information resources. 
Collaborations between librarians and departments determined the 
specifics of the class, which were then incorporated into the course 
design and implementation. Presents an evaluation of the current course 
and an approach for best practices.
NO ID: 504

RT Journal
ID 3465
A1 Raskin,Jef
T1 Looking for a humane interface: Will computers ever become easy to 
use?
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 24 pages.
SP 98
OP 101
K1 User interface
K1 Man machine interaction
K1 Technological change
K1 Innovations
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (5400) Research & development
AB It is now evident that one of the most remarkable changes in the 
computing milieu was in neither hardware nor software per se, but was 
embodied in an interface design concept that has since been 
implemented, with variations, on a variety of platforms and operating 
systems. The primacy of the interface was a revolution largely 
unforeseen by even the boldest of science fiction writers. The GUI, 
originally introduced primarily to provide a visual metaphor for an 
operating system, has changed culture. The present systems have come to 
be as large, complex, and nightmarish as the mainframes they first 
displaced. The basic concept of operating-system-and-applications is 
flawed from a cognitive perspective because the user must be 
consciously aware of both the task at hand and the current system 
state. At present, each application in a GUI is a walled city with its 
own customs and habits. Some strides have been made in science-based, 
engineering-spirited human-computer interaction.
NO ID: 100

RT Report
ID 3467
A1 Redner,S.
T1 Citation Statistics From More than a Century of Physical Review
YR 2004
FD October 6
SP 1
OP 12
AB We study the statistics of citations from all Physical Review 
journals for the 110-year period 1893 until 2003. In addition to 
characterizing the citation distribution and identifying publications 
with the highest citation impact, we investigate how citations evolve 
with time. There is a positive correlation between the number of 
citations to a paper and the average age of citations. Citations from a 
publication have an exponentially decaying age distribution; that is, 
old papers tend to not get cited. In contrast, the citations to a 
publication are consistent with a power-law age distribution, with an 
exponent close to -1 over a time range of 2 -- 20 years. We also 
identify a number of strongly-correlated citation bursts and other 
dramatic features in the time history of citations to individual 
publications.
NO ID: 551
PP Los Alamos, NM
T3 Tertiary Citation Statistics From More than a Century of Physical 
Review
UL http://arxiv.org/abs/physics/0407137

RT Journal
ID 3466
A1 Redner,S.
T1 How popular is your paper? An empirical study of the citation 
distribution
JF European Physical Journal B
YR 1998
VO 4
IS 2
SP 131
OP 134
AB Numerical data for the distribution of citations are examined for: 
(i) papers published in 1981 in journals which are catalogued by the 
Institute for Scientific Information (783,339 papers) and (ii) 20 years 
of publications in Physical Review D, vols. 11-50 (24,296 papers). A 
Zipf plot of the number of citations to a given paper versus its 
citation rank appears to be consistent with a power-law dependence for 
leading rank papers, with exponent close to -1/2. This, in turn, 
suggests that the number of papers with x citations, N(x), has a large-
x power law decay $N(x)\sim x^{-\alpha}$, with $\alpha\approx 3$.
NO ID: 416

RT Journal
ID 3469
A1 Reed,Christopher, A.
T1 Just Say No to Exploitative Publishers of Science Journals
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2004
VO 50
IS 24
SP B16
AB It used to be publish or perish. Now it is publish and perish. 
Academic science and medicine are drowning in a sea of publications. 
They have developed a journal-publishing culture that threatens to 
engulf them. Library budgets can't keep up. The peer-review system is 
overloaded. Researchers feel overwhelmed. Biologists at the University 
of California at San Francisco have called for a boycott of several 
popular Cell journals in response to overpricing by the British-Dutch 
conglomerate Reed Elsevier. Cornell University is canceling more than 
150 Elsevier journals and refused to accept a bundled deal.
NO ID: 775
UL http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i24/24b01601.htm

RT Journal
ID 3468
A1 Reed,Christopher, A.
T1 Drowning in a Sea of Refereed Publications
JF Chemical and Engineering News
JO Chem.Eng.News
YR 2001
VO 37
SP 37
OP 38
AB Are there are too many journals, too many papers, even too many 
meetings these days? Most people seem to think so. There’s a dilution 
effect. More is less. As referees, we are constantly being pressured to 
turn more manuscripts around faster. Quality must be suffering. New 
journals are appearing regularly. Old ones die slowly. Libraries can’t 
afford them. Editors are so overloaded that editorial input into the 
science is now very rare. Authors feel they have to publish something 
three times to get heard. The newest scientific unit, the LPU (Least 
Publishable Unit), is being overused. Exaggeration of novelty and 
significance is common. Readers seem overwhelmed. Many scientists 
complain of being too busy to read the literature. This is not good. 
The importance and integrity of published work must remain paramount.
NO ID: 784
UL http://reedgroup.ucr.edu/seaofpubs.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 3470
A1 Reed,Sally Gardner
T1 Making the Case for Your Library : A How-To-Do-It Manual
YR 2001
VO 104; 104
AB A book review from Marketing Library Services 
(http://www.infotoday.com/mls/sep01/cullings.htm) states - "In short, 
it is an effective tool for libraries that have recognized the need to 
market themselves. Marketing libraries is hardly a new idea. But Reed 
makes an important distinction in her preface. Today, marketing 
libraries is not simply a good idea, or a good business practice--it is 
a matter of survival. Most of us have encountered the attitude that 
most threatens public and other libraries: People think that, with the 
advent of the Internet, libraries have become superfluous. Library 
staffs know that the Internet has significantly changed the way that 
libraries are used, but it has not eliminated the need for them--far 
from it. But that's a message that the public at large has yet to 
understand."
NO ID: 327
PB Neal Schuman Publishers, Inc
PP New York
SN 1-55570-399-2

RT Journal
ID 3471
A1 Reedijk,Jan
T1 Sense and nonsense of science citation analyses: comments on the 
monopoly position of ISI and citation inaccuracies. Risks of possible 
misuse and biased citation and impact data
JF New Journal of Chemistry
YR 1998
VO 22
IS 8
SP 767
OP 770
AB Journal editors and publishers, authors of scientific papers, 
research directors, university and research council administrators, and 
even government officials increasingly make use of so-called "Impact 
Factors" to evaluate the quality of journals, authors and research 
groups. These Figures are used in decision-making processes about 
(dis)continuation of journal subscriptions, selection of journals for 
submission of papers, ranking of authors and groups of authors, and 
even for increase and decrease of funding to research groups. All data 
are based on the counting of citations of the scientific papers of 
authors. Very few users appear to realize that these Figures can be 
seriously wrong, biased and even manipulated, as a result of : (i) 
citation habits for authors in different fields, (ii) selectivity in 
(non)citations by authors, (iii) errors made by authors in citation 
lists at the end of papers, (iv) errors made by ISI in entering 
publications and citations in databases, and in classifying citations 
and accrediting them to journals and authors, and (v) incomplete and 
misleading impact Figures published by ISI. Although quite a few bona 
fide and competent analysts and organisations specialized in citation 
analyses exist, the incompetence of many analysts, when using crude ISI 
data in discussing rankings of journal and/or authors, is an additional 
factor that makes such analyses often unreliable. This paper reviews 
some of the current practices in publications and citations for 
(bio)chemists and (bio)chemistry journals ; critical comments are made 
with regard to the use and consequences of erroneous and incomplete or 
too detailed data. A few recent examples are given of the use and 
misuse of such data, to illustrate and evaluate the (non)sense of 
current practice.
NO ID: 142
UL http://www.rsc.org/is/journals/current/newjchem/nj022008.htm

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3472
A1 Reeves,N.
A1 Mills,S.
A1 Noyes,J.
T1 Information retrieval from a user perspective
YR 1995
K1 Information retrieval is difficult for the novice computer user. 
human factors
NO ID: 96
T2 IEE colloquium on Information Overload
PB IEE

RT Journal
ID 3473
A1 Reichhardt,Tony
T1 It's sink or swim as a tidal wave of data approaches
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 1999
VO 399
IS 6736
SP 517
OP 520
AB Enormous amounts of data are being amassed in fields as diverse as 
genomics and astronomy. If this information is to be used effectively 
to speed the pace of discovery, scientists need new ways of working. 
This requires investment in computers, new statistical tools, and a 
liberal approach to data sharing.
NO ID: 242

RT Journal
ID 3474
A1 Rein,Laura O.
A1 Hurley,Faith P.
A1 Walsh,John C.
A1 Wu,Anna C.
T1 Formula-Based Subject Allocation: A Practical Approach
JF Collection Management
YR 1993
VO 17
IS 4
SP 25
OP 48
NO ID: 362

RT Journal
ID 3475
A1 Reynolds,Michael M.
T1 What is a Library School? The School of library and information 
services at the University of Maryland
JF Library Binder
YR 1970
FD June
SP 16
OP 20
NO ID: 849

RT Book, Section
ID 3476
A1 Rice,Ronald E.
A1 Crawford,Gregory Alan
T1 Analysis of citations between communication and library and 
information science articles
YR 1992
SP 8
OP 12
K1 Descriptor: Periodicals, Library science.
K1 Citation analysis.
K1 Periodicals, Communication
NO BLIB92013276 Provider: OCLC; chart. 0938734695 Related Record: 
blib92013160 English analytic; ID: 446
T2 American Society for Information Science. Annual Meeting (55th :1992 
:Pittsburgh, Pa.). ASIS '92 Learned Information
PP United States

RT Book, Section
ID 3477
A1 Richards,Daniel T.
T1 Collection assessment in science libraries: an overview
YR 1989
SP 89
OP 98
AB Describes and evaluates the methodologies of collection evaluation 
and assessment as applied in scientific libraries. Discusses the 
information process in the scientific community and relates that 
process to the structure of scientific literature, current publishing 
trends, and the economics of information delivery. Includes 
recommendations for ongoing as well as one-time, collection evaluation 
projects.
NO ID: 417
A2 Burkhart,R. W.
T2 IAMSLIC at a crossroads -- International Association of Marine 
Science Libraries and Information Centers. Conference (15th :1989 :St 
George's, Bermuda).
PB International Association of Marine Science Libraries and 
Information Centers

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3478
A1 Roast,C.
T1 Modelling interaction with distributed information: so much 
information, so little time
YR 1995
K1 human computer interaction, user interfaces, real-time systems
NO ID: 98
T2 IEE Colloquium on Information Overload
PB IEE

RT Journal
ID 3479
A1 Rogers,Sally A.
T1 Electronic Journal Usage at Ohio State University
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2001
FD January
VO 62
IS 1
SP 25
OP 34
AB E-journal, printed journal, and database usage data from campus 
polls conducted annually, 1998-2000, at one large research university 
show increased use of e-journals and decreased use of printed journals 
by faculty and graduate students as the number of available e-journals 
increased from 200 to more than 3,000. The majority of users were from 
departments in the sciences.
NO ID: 490

RT Journal
ID 3480
A1 Rolinson,J.
A1 Al-Shanbari,H.
A1 Meadows,A. J.
T1 Information Usage by Biological Researchers
JF Journal of Information Science
JO J.Inf.Sci.
YR 1996
VO 22
IS 1
SP 47
OP 53
AB Surveys research information usage at four different types of 
institutions. Shows that there is a wide spread of information needs.
NO ID: 487

RT Journal
ID 3481
A1 Rosen,Charlie
T1 My computer-related wish list for the next 50 years
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 23 pages.
SP 122
OP 124
K1 Computer science
K1 Artificial intelligence
K1 Predictions
K1 Applications
K1 Innovations
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (5400) Research & development
AB The most important and perhaps the most difficult functional 
improvement of sophisticated computer usage for the next 50 years would 
be the capability of conversing with the computer in natural language, 
approaching human capabilities, at least partially. One should be able 
to engage the computer in a 2-way conversation in natural language. 
Augmenting the neural net procedures with algorithms derived from other 
artificial intelligence programs and improving the iterative learning 
mode may result in a powerful means of programming the machine by 
examples. Within a decade, high-quality bright flat-panel active-matrix 
displays, and relatively unlimited mass memory, will be available at 
very low cost. Energy requirements will be low, and new storage 
batteries will have been developed. These technologies will make 
possible a portable reading device that can present the contents of a 
book or magazine one page at a time without external light sources. 
Useful autonomous robots will ultimately be designed and built.
NO ID: 106

RT Journal
ID 3482
A1 Roth,Dana L.
T1 Caveat Chemicus: practical guidance to searching chemical abstracts
JF Searcher: the magazine for database professionals
YR 1998
VO 6
IS 3
SP 12
OP 17
NO ID: 246

RT Journal
ID 3483
A1 Rousseau,Ronald
T1 Journal evaluation: technical and practical issues
JF Library Trends
YR 2002
VO 50
IS 3
SP 418
OP 439
AB THIS ESSAY PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW of journal evaluation indicators. It 
highlights the strengths and weaknesses of different indicators, 
together with their range of applicability. The definition of a 
"quality journal," different notions of impact factors, the meaning of 
ranking journals, and possible biases in citation databases are also 
discussed. Attention is given to using the journal impact in evaluation 
studies. The quality of a journal is a multifaceted notion. Journals 
can be evaluated for different purposes, and hence the results of such 
evaluation exercises can be quite different depending on the 
indicator(s) used. The impact factor, in one of its versions, is 
probably the most used indicator when it comes to gauging the 
visibility of a journal on the research front. Generalized impact 
factors, over periods longer than the traditional two years, are better 
indicators for the long-term value of a journal. As with all evaluation 
studies, care must be exercised when considering journal impact factors 
as a quality indicator. It seems best to use a whole battery of 
indicators (including several impact factors) and to change this group 
of indicators depending on the purpose of the evaluation study. 
Nowadays it goes without saying that special attention is paid to e-
journals and specific indicators for this type of journal.
NO ID: 742
UL http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1387/is_3_50/ai_88582623

RT Journal
ID 3484
A1 Rowley,Jennifer
T1 Marketing: A Review Article
JF Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
YR 1997
VO 29
IS 3
SP 155
OP 159
AB Several text books on general marketing and service marketing are 
the basis for this short review article; it is not an exhaustive 
review. The author summarizes how service marketing is appropriate for 
the library service industry.
NO ID: 328

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3485
A1 Rowse,Mark
T1 Tell me what you want, what you really, really want! Research into 
the online information needs of the STM journal user
YR 1999
NO ID: 429
T2 User Behaviour in the Online Scholarly Research Environment - 
Ingenta Institute
UL http://www.gateway.ingenta.com/institute1999/rowse.doc

RT Book, Section
ID 3486
A1 Ruelle,Joan D.
T1 Going to (the Engineering) School: Strategies for Integrating 
Library Instruction in the Engineering Curriculum
YR 2001
SP 352
NO ID: 875
A2 Dewey,Barbara I.
T2 Library User Education: Powerful Learning, Powerful Partnerships
PB Scarecrow Press, Inc
PP Lanham, MD

RT Journal
ID 3487
A1 Rupp-Serrano,Karen
A1 Robbins,Sarah
A1 Cain,Danielle
T1 Canceling print serials in favor of electronic: criteria for 
decision making
JF Library Collections, Acquisitions, & Technical Services
YR 2002
VO 26
IS 4
SP 369
OP 378
AB Libraries have welcomed electronic serials into their collections. 
Publishers have encouraged this trend by offering titles in electronic 
format at little or no additional cost to the print subscription. This 
trend may, however, be in decline, forcing libraries to reconsider what 
they are receiving and in what format(s). This article discusses 
several potential criteria that may be utilized by libraries in 
developing documents to guide their format cancellation decisions. 
[Copyright 2002 Elsevier]
NO ID: 543

RT Journal
ID 3488
A1 Saffo,Paul
T1 Sensors: The next wave of innovation
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 26 pages.
SP 92
OP 97
K1 Technological change
K1 r&d
K1 Sensors
K1 Analog
K1 Future
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (5400) Research & development
K1 (5240) Software & systems
AB It turns out that about once a decade a new technology comes along 
that completely reshapes the information landscape. Today, the end of 
the laser decade is approaching. The coming decade will be shaped by 
cheap, ubiquitous, high-performance sensors. Sensory organs will be 
added to computer devices and networks. A suite of technologies 
underlies the rise of sensors: 1. piezo materials, which give off an 
electrical charge when deformed and which conversely deform when in the 
presence of an electrical field, 2. micromachines, which are 
semiconductor cousins to MEMS technology, 3. VLSI video, and 4. MEMS, 
which employs released layers in semiconductor manufacturing. MEMS 
research has been underway for over a decade, and the technology is by 
far the most important of all the technologies. The first-order impact 
of sensors will be cheap I/O for networks and computing devices. The 
long-term consequence of the coming sensor revolution may be the 
emergence of a newer analog computing industry.
NO ID: 117

RT Journal
ID 3489
A1 Salisbury,Lutishoor
A1 Noguera,Emilio
T1 Usability of E-journals and Preference for the Virtual Periodicals 
Room: a Survey of Mathematics Faculty and Graduate Students
JF Electronic Journal of Academic and Special Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 4
IS 2-3
SP Using several variables, the University of Arkansas Libraries 
conducted a survey in 2002 to measure the nature and extent of journal 
use in the Mathematics Reading Room, the Virtual Periodicals Room and 
Mullins Library. The aims of this survey were two
NO ID: 585
UL 
http://southernlibrarianship.icaap.org/content/v04n03/Salisbury_l01.htm

RT Book, Section
ID 3490
A1 Salzwedel,Beth A.
A1 Green,Ellen Wilson
T1 Planning and Marketing
YR 2000
SP 37
OP 54
AB The term marketing is used by many people as just another word for 
publicity or promotion, but it is really much more. Marketing plays an 
important role in helping libraries to achieve its goals. They note 
that the alternative to planning and marketing is usually chaos and 
crisis management.
NO ID: 329
A2 Holst,Ruth
T2 The Medical Library Association Guide to Managing Health Care 
Libraries
PB Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc
PP New York

RT Report
ID 3491
A1 Sandqvist,Aa
T1 The A&A Experience With Impact Factors
YR 2004
FD March 8
SP 1
OP 4
AB There is a widespread impression that the scientific journal 
"Astronomy & Astrophysics" (A&A) has a smaller impact, as measured by 
citations to articles, than some of the other major astronomy journals. 
This impression was apparently supported - and probably created - by 
the Journal Citation Report (JCR), which is prepared annually by the 
Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge. The 
published poor impact factor of A&A was in fact wrong and was due to a 
serious flaw in the method used by ISI Web of Knowledge to determine 
it. The resulting damage inflicted upon A&A by the JCR is incalculable.
NO to be published in A. Heck (ed.) "Organizations and Strategies in 
Astronomy, Vol. 5" (Kluwer, 2004); ID: 603
PP Stockholm
T3 Tertiary The A&A Experience With Impact Factors
UL http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0403184

RT Journal
ID 3492
A1 Sannwald,William W.
T1 Espresso and ambiance: what public libraries can learn from 
bookstores
JF Library Administration & Management
YR 1998
VO 12
IS 4
SP 200
OP 211
AB Looks at what makes bookstores so successful today. Examines why 
exterior and interior spaces are important to libraries; how spaces 
support the library's mission, goals, and objectives; what libraries 
can learn from the retail market regarding bookstore merchandising and 
design; and how this information can benefit libraries. In almost every 
large city in North America, one of the most popular places to go is 
the super bookstore. People like to browse the books and magazines, 
take in the ambiance, and be seen and perceived as a patron of the arts 
and literature. The bookstore has become a community center that 
attracts people for a variety of reasons.
NO ID: 205

RT Book, Whole
ID 3493
A1 Sapp,Gregg
T1 A brief history of the future of libraries : an annotated 
bibliography
YR 2002
SP 294
AB Has chapters -- Tradition Confronts Technology: 1978-1984 p. 1 -- 
New Directions and the Beginnings of Change, 1985-1989 p. 51 -- 
Electronic Libraries and New Paradigms, 1990-1994 p. 107 -- Future 
Arrives, 1995-1999 p. 203
NO ID: 802
PB Scarecrow Press
PP Lanham, MD
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0810841967

RT Journal
ID 3495
A1 Sapp,Gregg
A1 Gilmour,Ron
T1 A Brief History of the Future of Academic Libraries: Predictions and 
Speculations from the Literature of the Profession, 1975 to 2000–part 
two, 1990 to 2000
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2003
VO 3
IS 1
SP 13
OP 34
AB During the last quarter of the twentieth century, the literature of 
academic librarianship was replete with articles predicting, 
anticipating, speculating, and/or cautioning about future possibilities 
for the field. The seminal works of F. W. Lancaster, who was one of the 
early predictors and enthusiasts of "paperless information systems," 
are the key points of departure for this literature. This article 
(which covers the period of time from 1990 to 1999), as well as its 
first part (1975 to 1989), employ a citation-tracking method for 
gathering and reviewing this literature. Each work discussed in this 
article either cites Lancaster's work, or another that cites it, so 
that the resulting literature review has grown from a common source of 
thought. The aim is to provide an analytical overview on how academic 
librarians saw and attempted to shape the future of their field during 
a period of unprecedented change.
NO ID: 513

RT Journal
ID 3494
A1 Sapp,Gregg
A1 Gilmour,Ron
T1 A Brief History of the Future of Academic Libraries: Predictions and 
Speculations from the Literature of the Profession, 1975 to 2000 (Part 
1, 1975 to 1989)
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2002
VO 2
IS 4
SP 553
OP 576
AB During the last quarter of the twentieth century, the literature of 
academic librarianship was replete with articles predicting, 
anticipating, speculating, or cautioning about future possibilities for 
the field. The seminal works of F. W. Lancaster, who was one of the 
early predictors and enthusiasts of "paperless information systems," 
are the key points of departure for this literature. This article 
(which covers the period of time from roughly 1975 to 1989), as well as 
its second part (1990 to 1999), employs a citation-tracking method for 
gathering and reviewing this literature. Each work discussed in this 
article cites either Lancaster's work, or another work that cites it, 
so that the resulting literature review has grown from a common source 
of thought. The aim is to provide an analytical overview on how 
academic librarians saw and attempted to shape the future of their 
field during a period of unprecedented change.
NO ID: 514

RT Journal
ID 3496
A1 Savolainen,Reijo
A1 Kari,Jarkko
T1 Conceptions of the Internet in everyday life information seeking
JF Journal of Information Science
JO J.Inf.Sci.
YR 2004
VO 30
IS 3
SP 219
OP 226
AB Based on the interviews of 18 people in Finland in 2001-2, 
conceptions of the Internet as an information source were explored. In 
general, the conceptions reflect the acceptability, accessibility and 
usability of Internet sources. Most conceptions appeared to be quite 
impressionistic, reflecting the basic difficulty of describing the 
constantly changing nature of the Internet. Two major kinds of Internet 
conceptions were identified. First, in metaphorical conceptions, the 
Internet was primarily conceived in terms of space or place, for 
example, a library or a bazaar. Second, conceptions based on actual use 
experiences of the Internet significantly drew on quality judgments of 
the networked services. Since a growing number of information sources 
of various types are competing for people’s attention, general level 
conceptions of sources and channels will gain importance as a criterion 
by which sources will be accepted or rejected. This seems to be a 
particular characteristic of networked information environments.
NO ID: 718
UL http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/30/3/219

RT Book, Whole
ID 3497
A1 Schenk,Margaret T.
A1 Webster,James K.
T1 What every engineer should know about engineering information 
resources
YR 1984
AB Technology -- Information services, Technical literature
NO T10.7 .S34 1984; ID: 872
PB Marcel Dekker
PP New York
SN 082477244X

RT Journal
ID 3498
A1 Scherlen,Allan
A1 Tumlin,Markel
A1 Whiting,Peter C.
T1 New Frontiers in Reference Service: Electronic Serials Transforming 
Public Service
JF Serials Librarian
YR 2002
VO 42
IS 3/4
SP 211
OP 216
AB Analyzes the changes in online serial resources and reference 
services in San Diego, California. Impact of electronic serials on 
librarians; Improvement in the online serials accessibility; 
Introduction of an electronic serials in several libraries.
NO ID: 541

RT Journal
ID 3499
A1 Schmidt,Diane
A1 Davis,Elisabeth B.
A1 Jahr,Ruby
T1 Biology journal use at an academic library: a comparison of use 
studies
JF Serials Review
YR 1994
VO 20
IS 2
SP 45
OP 64
AB College and university libraries -- Serial publications Use studies 
-- Serial publications. Periodicals, Biological. University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign.
NO ID: 373

RT Newspaper Article
ID 3500
A1 Schneider,Karen G.
T1 My Money, My Life : The librarians image, unrevised
JF New York Times
YR 2000
FD October 29,2000
SP Section 3, page 24
AB I AM a librarian, a part of a feminized profession with a median 
starting salary that recently topped $30,000. Despite a growing demand 
for our services, major areas of the country are unable to keep or 
attract employees for their public libraries. This must change if 
librarianship is to survive. But after reading a spate of articles 
about young whatever-somethings complaining about feeling poor when 
they're earning six figures, or apple-cheeked billionaires bemoaning 
spiritual emptiness, I would like to note that wading in the low end of 
the professional salary scale is not without advantages.
NO ID: 214
T2 New York Times
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 3501
A1 Schoch,N. A.
A1 Shooshan,S. E.
T1 Communication on a listserv for health information professionals: 
uses and users of MEDLIB-L
JF Bull Med Libr Assoc
JO Bull.Med.Libr.Assoc.
YR 1997
FD Jan
VO 85
IS 1
SP 23
OP 32
K1 (Minor): Chi-Square Distribution
K1 Computer Communication Networks -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Computer Communication Networks -- utilization
K1 Information Services -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Information Services -- utilization
K1 Libraries, Medical -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Population Surveillance
K1 Questionnaires
K1 Software
K1 Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
K1 Telecommunications -- statistics & numerical data
K1 Telecommunications -- utilization
K1 United States
AB BACKGROUND: Listservs offer the potential for participants to engage 
in a "virtual conference" with experts and colleagues from around the 
world. However, little research has been done to study the use and 
effectiveness of this means of communication. METHODS: In April 1995, 
an electronic survey of MEDLIB-L subscribers was conducted to determine 
demographic characteristics and uses of the listserv. RESULTS: 
Respondents worked predominately at academic institutions (45%) as 
members of large staffs (44%) in the United States (82%). The majority 
had worked as health information professionals for more than ten years. 
Nearly 90% of respondents read MEDLIB-L at work and most spent fewer 
than three hours per week doing this. More than half of the respondents 
read 41% to 100% of the messages distributed by the list, with fewer 
than 20% reading 91% to 100% of the messages. Respondents reported 
initiating and responding to reference questions and product 
information with greatest frequency. There was no relationship between 
years of experience in the profession and participation in listserv 
activities except in the category of posting information. CONCLUSIONS: 
This study describes communication activities on MEDLIB-L and the 
extent of subscriber participation in these activities.
NO PMID: 9028568; Medline: 97180392 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 
0025-7338; NLM Unique Journal Identifier: 0421037 English Index Medicus 
Journal Article Citation: Status: Completed Owner: NLM; ID: 437
AD College of Library and Information Services, University of Maryland, 
College Park 20742, USA. schoch@oriole.umd.edu

RT Journal
ID 3502
A1 Schwartz,Charles A.
T1 The rise and fall of uncitedness. case study of College & research 
libraries
JF Coll Res Libr
YR 1997
FD Jan.
VO 58
SP 19
OP 29
AB Citation analysis -- Case studies. Library science literature -- 
Evaluation. Title Subject: College & research libraries.
NO BLIB97001999 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0010-0870 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 464

RT Journal
ID 3503
A1 Schwartz,Jennifer
T1 Internet access and end-user needs: computer use in an academic 
library. study at New York University
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 2002
FD Spring
VO 41
IS 3
SP 253
OP 263
K1 Descriptor: Use studies -- Internet.
K1 Internet -- College and university libraries.
K1 Internet -- New York (N.Y.).
K1 Named Corp: Elmer Holmes Bobst Library
AB To provide the most appropriate reference services it is necessary 
for reference staff to understand the nature of the work that library 
users undertake. In the area of end-user searching in a Web-based 
environment, our knowledge is sparse and out-of-date. The current 
electronic environment provides access to free Web sites and highly 
structured subscription indexes all from the same terminals, all with 
different interfaces, all on the Web. This project was conceived to 
shed light on researchers' behavior in this new context. Examining how 
patrons approach their research needs using online resources, the study 
gathered information on the variety of sources accessed, users' 
requests for assistance, perceived facility with the resources, and the 
degree of satisfaction with search results. While end users often 
believe they have the tools to search independently, both on the "free 
Web" and within library-supported products, their searches are not 
necessarily effective. Because these online searchers believe that they 
are adept and successful, however, providing appropriate professional 
assistance is a complex endeavor.
NO BLIB02005146 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1094-9054 Details: 
bibl f il tab. article feature article; ID: 502

RT Report
ID 3504
A1 Schwarz,Greg J.
T1 Demographic and Citation Trends in Astrophysical Journal papers and 
Preprints
YR 2004
AB We have used data from ADS, AAS, and astro-ph, to study the 
publishing, preprint posting, and citation patterns for papers 
published in the ApJ in 1999 and 2002. This allowed us to track 
statistical trends in author demographics, preprint posting habits, and 
citation rates for ApJ papers as a whole and across various subgroups 
and types of ApJ papers. The most interesting results are the 
frequencies of use of the astro-ph server across various subdisciplines 
of astronomy, and the impact that such posting has on the citation 
history of the subsequent ApJ papers. By 2002 72% of ApJ papers were 
posted as astro-ph preprints, but this fraction varies from 22-95% 
among the subfields studied. A majority of these preprints (61%) were 
posted after the papers were accepted at ApJ, and 88% were posted or 
updated after acceptance. On average, ApJ papers posted on astro-ph are 
cited more than twice as often as those that are not posted on astro-
ph. This difference can account for a number of other, secondary 
citation trends, including some of the differences in citation rates 
between journals and different subdisciplines. Preprints clearly have 
supplanted the journals as the primary means for initially becoming 
aware of papers, at least for a large fraction of the ApJ author 
community.
NO ID: 569
T3 Tertiary Demographic and Citation Trends in Astrophysical Journal 
papers and Preprints
UL http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0411275

RT Journal
ID 3505
A1 Schwarzwalder,Robert
T1 Electronic Publishing and the American Institute of Physics
JF Database
YR 1998
IS August/September
SP 79
OP 81
K1 Gordon, Breach, intellectual freedom, aip
NO ID: 122

RT Journal
ID 3506
A1 Scully,Mariwayne
T1 Tips from Special Librarians on Cultivating Customer Relationships: 
Event Ideas
JF Colorado Libraries
YR 2001
VO 27
IS 4
SP 35
OP 36
AB Provides many tips for the promotion of a special library. Some of 
the tips seems a little strange - like showing movies that have 
librarians as characters, but one might get some new ideas.
NO ID: 330

RT Journal
ID 3507
A1 Seamans,Nancy H.
T1 Student perceptions of information literacy: insights for librarians
JF Reference Services Review
YR 2002
VO 30
IS 2
SP 112
OP 123
AB To determine what kinds of services are appropriate and necessary 
for first-year college students, it is useful to first understand how 
students acquire and use information during the beginning of their 
college lives. Questions based on the Information Literacy Competency 
Standards for Higher Education were used in interviews with students in 
order to better understand the kinds of information first-year students 
at Virginia Tech needed, and how they acquired it during their first 
semester at college. Students were questioned about their information 
use during fall semester 2000, using both e-mail questioning and face-
to-face interviews. The data collected provided insights into how 
students acquire and use information, and resulted in suggestions that 
are being used in revising and improving library services for this 
population.
NO ID: 744
UL http://thesius.emeraldinsight.com/vl=1307143/cl=28/nw=1/rpsv/cgi-
bin/linker?ini=emerald&reqidx=/cw/mcb/00907324/v30n2/s3/p112

RT Journal
ID 3508
A1 Seamans,Nancy H.
A1 Metz,Paul
T1 Virginia Tech's Innovative College Librarian Program
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2002
VO 63
IS 4
SP 324
OP 332
AB Examines the college library program of Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute and State University Libraries. Framework of the program; 
Roles of the college librarian in the program; Challenges faced with 
the implementation of the program.
NO ID: 545

RT Journal
ID 3509
A1 Seeds,Robert S.
T1 Impact of a Digital Archive (JSTOR) on Print Collection Use
JF Collection Building
YR 2002
VO 21
IS 3
SP 120
OP 122
AB The ubiquitous question of whether electronic journals [particularly 
in mathematics] are capable of replacing paper versions is beginning to 
be answered. The author discusses patterns of use observed in a 
scholarly setting where severe remote library storage created greater 
incentive to rely on electronically archived journals (JSTOR). As 
awareness of electronic access increased, use of the equivalent paper 
collection declined. In fact, electronic use is on a significantly 
larger scale than that measured for paper. These observations permitted 
the author to confidently transfer all electronically archived journals 
to remote storage and to conclude that electronic journals can 
substitute for paper.
NO ID: 352
UL http://0-
juno.emeraldinsight.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu/vl=7793828/cl=70/nw=1/rpsv
/cgi-bin/linker?ini=emerald&reqidx=/cw/mcb/01604953/v21n3/s3/p120

RT Journal
ID 3510
A1 Selinger,Carl
T1 Drowning in data: How do deal with information overload and stay 
abreast of your field
JF IEEE Spectrum (Careers section)
YR 2005
AB You're at your desk, surrounded by piles of magazines, journals, and 
reports you're supposed to read, while your PC screen blinks with 
dozens of unopened e-mails containing (amid the spam) project updates, 
industry newsletters, and product announcements. You're just getting 
ready to tackle this mountain of new data when your manager walks over 
and asks you to quickly research a competitor's new project. "When do 
you need it?" you ask. "Yesterday!" she retorts. Welcome to the world 
of information overload. There was a time, only a few hundred years 
ago, when one person could learn all the knowledge there was to know. 
Not anymore! In our burgeoning technological age, the rate of change in 
many fields is actually increasing, as the tsunami of information 
that's clogging your e-mail, your desk, and your in-box proves. Though 
your first impulse might be to run and hide, you know how critical it 
is to keep up with changes in your profession, to find out what you 
need to know, when you need it, and then apply it effectively. Locating 
the right information is vitalnot only to solve an immediate problem, 
but also to support your career advancement. So what's an engineer to 
do?
NO ID: 717
UL 
http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/careers/careerstemplate.jsp?ArticleId=c010
205

RT Journal
ID 3511
A1 Selker,Ted
T1 What will happen in the next 50 years?
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 22 pages.
SP 88
OP 89
K1 Technological change
K1 Communications systems
K1 Software industry
K1 Predictions
K1 Social impact
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (1200) Social policy
K1 (8302) Software & computer services industry
AB Scenarios that include electronic communication and computer memory 
have been developed and are slowly being put into place, making it 
possible to get money, apply, and register for things without ever 
engaging a human intermediary. In the next 50 years, however, the 
collaborations and communications between people will continue to be 
popular. As people move about in their personal lives, the artifacts 
carried to record their experience will be replaced by tools allowing 
people to record their experiences with less effort and will not 
require retranscription. The traditional pen and wallet will be 
transformed. The nature of relationships is going to be fundamentally 
impacted by the communications software developed in the next 5 years. 
The collective task of the computer industry in the forthcoming years 
is to visualize revolution without dying emotionally in the viscosity 
of change.
NO ID: 115

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3512
A1 Session,STS
T1 The New Crossroads: Science Librarians in the 21st Century
YR 2005
FD June 27
AB The development of the World Wide Web, rapidly emerging new 
electronic media, and shifting trends in scholarly communication are 
challenging 21st century science and technology librarians to be very 
creative, proactive, and dynamic. They must take on new roles, not only 
in the ways they provide services to their clientele, but also, 
establishing partnerships, coalitions, and connections at the personal 
and organizational levels. The pace of change in the provision of 
information is escalating with federated searching, development of 
institutional repositories, and the necessity for sweeping changes in 
the process of scholarly communication. Science librarians are at a new 
crossroads - are we ready? Have we developed the right skills and 
expertise? Will Charles Darwin's theory of "survival of the fittest" 
work for science librarians? If so, what does the future hold for 
science and technology librarians? Speakers -- Mary Case, University of 
Illinois at Chicago -- New Crossroads: Transitions and Transformations 
- Science Librarians in the 21st Century. An overview of issues and 
trends in scholarly communication, and their impact on the future role 
of science librarians. Mel DeSart, University of Washington at Seattle 
-- Science Librarians in the 21st Century: A Cautionary Tale. Tips for 
helping users who do not visit the library, for proving the relevance 
of science librarians, and for attracting qualified people to the 
profession. Michael Leach, Harvard University -- Science Librarians in 
the 21st Century. The future role of science librarians as research, 
education and digital object experts. Alison Ricker, Oberlin College -- 
Science Librarians in Liberal Arts Colleges: At a Crossroads or in the 
Crosshairs? Opportunities and Challenges in the 21st Century. Popular 
and emerging technologies used by NetGens, and methods for 
incorporating these technologies into libraries.
NO ID: 836
T2 ALA Conference
PB ALA
PP Chicago
UL 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/aboutacrl/acrlsections/sciencetech/stsconfe
rences/program05.htm

RT Journal
ID 3513
A1 Shapiro,Jeremy J.
A1 Hughes,Shelley K.
T1 Information literacy as a liberal art: enlightenment proposals for a 
new cirriculum
JF Educom Review
YR 1996
VO 31
IS 2
AB What does a person need to know today to be a full-fledged, 
competent and literate member of the information society? As we witness 
not only the saturation of our daily lives with information organized 
and transmitted via information technology, but the way in which public 
issues and social life increasingly are affected by information-
technology issues - from intellectual property to privacy and the 
structure of work to entertainment, art and fantasy life - the issue of 
what it means to be information-literate becomes more acute for our 
whole society. Should everyone take a course in creating a Web page, 
computer programming, TCP/IP protocols or multimedia authoring? Or are 
we looking at a broader and deeper challenge - to rethink our entire 
educational curriculum in terms of information?
NO ID: 150
UL http://www.educause.edu/pub/er/review/reviewArticles/31231.html

RT Journal
ID 3514
A1 Shkolnik,Leon
T1 The continuing debate over academic branch libraries
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1991
IS July
SP 343
OP 351
K1 centralization decentralization management manage
AB To centralize or decentralize, that is the question. Librarians have 
debated the organization of the academic library for the last century. 
This article analyzes both sides of the debate, placing each in its 
proper historical perspective. The author presents prospects for the 
future organization of the library in light of current trends and 
technological developments. There is a good bibliography dealing with 
the topic at the end of the article.
NO ID: 85

RT Journal
ID 3515
A1 Shneiderman,Ben
T1 Between hope and fear
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 24 pages.
SP 59
OP 62
K1 Computer science
K1 Technological change
K1 Social impact
K1 Applications
K1 Predictions
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (1200) Social policy
AB Computing has grown into a worldwide infrastructure that touches 
every country and soon may touch every individual on the planet. An 
obvious vision of hope for the future is by technology extrapolation 
which posits that advances in technology are in themselves beneficial 
to society. One wish for the future is for universal access to 
computing technology. With millions of new users, improved strategies 
for filtering email, searching directories, finding information, and 
getting online assistance will be needed. Another wish is for universal 
medical records. Progress on standardizing clinical records, speeding 
data entry for patient histories, and designing effective overviews for 
viewing patient records could be dramatically accelerated. Further 
benefits of online medical records include assistance in formulating 
treatment plans and clinical research. Another wish is for universal 
educational support. Finding information on the Net is useful only if 
students have a meaningful goal and a chance to influence their world.
NO ID: 112

RT Journal
ID 3516
A1 Shropshire,Sandra
T1 Beyond the Design and Evaluation of Library Web Sites: An Analysis 
and Four Case Studies
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 2
SP 95
OP 101
AB Identifies the salient issues in Web site direction for library Web 
site management in the U.S. Discussion on library literature; Common 
issues concerning library Web sites; Practical application of Web site 
management through examination of four case studies.
NO ID: 531

RT Report
ID 3518
A1 Simkin,M. V.
A1 Roychowdhury,V. P.
T1 Copied citations create renowned papers?
YR 2003
FD May 8
SP 1
OP 3
AB Recently we discovered (cond-mat/0212043) that the majority of 
scientific citations are copied from the lists of references used in 
other papers. Here we show that a model, in which a scientist picks 
three random papers, cites them,and also copies a quarter of their 
references accounts quantitatively for empirically observed citation 
distribution. Simple mathematical probability, not genius, can explain 
why some papers are cited a lot more than the other.
NO ID: 582
PP Los Angeles
T3 Tertiary Copied citations create renowned papers?
UL http://arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0305150

RT Report
ID 3517
A1 Simkin,M. V.
A1 Roychowdhury,V. P.
T1 Read before you cite!
YR 2002
FD December 3
SP 1
OP 4
AB We report a method of estimating what percentage of people who cited 
a paper had actually read it. The method is based on a stochastic 
modeling of the citation process that explains empirical studies of 
misprint distributions in citations (which we show follows a Zipf law). 
Our estimate is only about 20% of citers read the original.
NO ID: 581
PP Los Angeles
T3 Tertiary Read before you cite!
UL http://arxiv.org/abs/cond-mat/0212043

RT Journal
ID 3521
A1 Sinn,Robin N.
T1 A Local Citation Analysis of Mathematical and Statistical 
Dissertations
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2005
VO 25
IS 4
SP 25
OP 37
AB A citation analysis of the 1980-2002 mathematics and statistics 
dissertations at an Ohio university was compared with citation analyses 
of other science disciplines published in the literature. Mathematics 
and statistics students were found to use their journal literature less 
frequently than highly research oriented fields like chemistry and 
biology and more frequently than applied fields like engineering and 
computer science. The same general trend among the disciplines was seen 
when title dispersion was examined. Mathematics and statistics used 
more journal titles than chemistry and fewer journal titles than 
engineering. Collection managers can use the results of this study to 
protect a larger core journal collection for mathematics and to keep 
monograph purchasing at an adequate level.
NO ID: 832
UL 
https://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ698
9HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&ID=56511

RT Journal
ID 3520
A1 Sinn,Robin N.
T1 A comparison of library instruction content by biology faculty and 
librarians
JF Res Strateg
YR 1999
FD 1999
VO 17
IS 1
SP 23
OP 34
AB Survey of 61 academic libraries in Ohio. Bibliographic instruction -
- Biology students. Surveys, College and university libraries.
NO BLIB01000543 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0734-3310 Details: 
il tab. article feature article; ID: 472

RT Journal
ID 3519
A1 Sinn,Robin N.
T1 Library instruction for biology courses: a literature review and 
survey. of academic libraries in Ohio
JF Res Strateg
YR 1998
VO 16
IS 2
SP 103
OP 115
K1 Descriptor: College and university libraries -- Ohio.
K1 Bibliographic instruction -- Biology students.
K1 Surveys -- Bibliographic instruction
AB College and university libraries -- Ohio. Bibliographic instruction 
-- Biology students. Surveys
NO BLIB99004368 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0734-3310 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 475

RT Book, Whole
ID 3522
A1 Slote,Stanley J.
T1 Weeding library collections : library weeding methods
YR 1997
SP 240
AB Slote shows you how to identify the core collections versus the 
weedable items. After reviewing current weeding practices and 
standards, he discusses a variety of traditional and computer-assisted 
methods for weeding.
NO ID: 862
PB Libraries Unlimited
PP Englewood, CO
SN 1563085658
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1563085658

RT Journal
ID 3523
A1 Small,Henry
T1 Visualizing science by citation mapping
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1999
VO 50
IS 9
SP 799
OP 813
AB Science mapping is discussed in the general context of information 
visualization. Attempts to construct maps of science using citation 
data are reviewed, focusing on the use of co-citation clusters. New 
work is reported on a dataset of about 36,000 documents using 
simplified methods for ordination, and nesting maps hierarchically. An 
overall map of the dataset shows the multidisciplinary breadth of the 
document sample, and submaps allow drilling down to the document level. 
An effort to visualize these data using advanced virtual reality 
software is described, and the creation of document pathways through 
the map is seen as a realization of Bush's (1945) associative trails.
NO ID: 191
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract?ID=62003226

RT Journal
ID 3524
A1 Snavely,Loanne L.
A1 Wright,Carol A.
T1 Research portfolio use in undergraduate honors education: assessment 
tool and model for future work
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2003
VO 29
IS 5
SP 298
OP 303
AB Information literacy goals have, on many levels, successfully been 
embraced within the higher education environment. The Information 
Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education outlines the 
competencies we strive to develop in students. At Penn State, these 
goals support behaviors that describe the characteristics of 
information literate students. These skills and characteristics, 
broadly described, include: Knowledge of information sources, the 
organization of information, and the nature of knowing—the attributes 
of scholarly knowledge; Skills in finding, evaluating, using, and 
effectively communicating information; Generalization of knowledge and 
skills to various applied settings with a positive disposition toward 
the use of new and extant information sources and information 
technologies; and Social context for the use of information, equal 
access to information, and the dissemination of knowledge.
NO ID: 600
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(03)00069-7

RT Journal
ID 3525
A1 Soehner,Catherine B.
A1 Wray,S. Tanner
A1 Richards,Daniel T.
T1 The landmark citation method: analysis of a citation pattern as a 
collection assessment method
JF Bulletin of the Medical Library Association
JO Bull.Med.Libr.Assoc.
YR 1992
VO 80
IS 4
SP 361
OP 366
AB The landmark citation method is a new collection assessment method 
based on the citation record of a single landmark article. This 
citation record is developed by identifying sources which cite the 
landmark article. A bibliography, extracted from the citation record, 
is then used to complete an assessment of the collection. This method 
was developed and used to assess the biotechnology collection of the 
National Library of Medicine. The information gained from this study, 
in addition to demonstrating the technique, also provided insight into 
the evolution of the biotechnology literature.
NO ID: 690
UL 
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/picrender.fcgi?artid=225700&action=str
eam&blobtype=pdf

RT Journal
ID 3526
A1 Soergel,Dagobert
T1 A Framework for Digital Library Research: Broadening the Vision
JF D-Lib Magazine
YR 2002
VO 8
IS 12
AB Digital library (DL) research and development needs a framework that 
can be used as a perspective on existing research and practice and, 
more importantly, as a structured vision for the development of new 
ideas. As distinct from the DELOS brainstorming report [1], which 
offers its own agenda for the next phase of DL research (and a somewhat 
ad-hoc roster for EU-NSF working groups), the framework offered here is 
based on a very broad view of digital libraries that takes full 
advantage of the possibilities offered by the integration of computer 
and telecommunication technology. When engine-driven vehicles were 
first introduced, they were built in the shape of a horse-drawn 
carriage and indeed were called "horseless carriages"; it took some 
time to take full advantage of the new technology and engineer the 
modern automobile. Much of DL practice is still at the stage of the 
"horseless carriage"; we must move on to the modern automobile.
NO ID: 619
UL http://www.dlib.org/dlib/december02/soergel/12soergel.html

RT Journal
ID 3528
A1 Somerville,Arleen N.
T1 SciFinder Scholar (by Chemical Abstracts Service) SP -?959-
JF Journal of chemical education
JO J.Chem.Educ.
YR 1998
VO 75
IS August
NO ID: 105

RT Book, Whole
ID 3527
A1 Somerville,Arleen N.
T1 Chemical Librarianship : Challenges and Opportunities
YR 1997
K1 Chemical libraries -- United States. Academic libraries. chemistry
NO Z675.C47 C47 1997Has been co-published simultaneously as _Science & 
technology libraries_, volume 16, numbers 3/4,1997; ID: 234
PB Haworth Press, Inc
PP New York, NY
SN 0789003880

RT Journal
ID 3529
A1 Spinellis,Diomidis
T1 The decay and failures of web references
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 2003
VO 46
IS 1
SP 71
OP 77
AB The objective of this article is to examine, quantify, and 
characterize the quantity and quality of Web links used in computing 
literature. Our aim is to provide definitive information related to the 
availability of URL references as a function of their age, their 
domain, the depth of the path used, as well as the technical reasons 
leading to failed links. Our research has been greatly aided by the 
emergence of online versions of traditional paper-based publications 
[4]. By tapping into the online libraries of the ACM and the IEEE 
Computer Society we were able to download, extract, and verify 4,375 
Web links appearing in print articles during the period from 1995–1999. 
Here, we describe the technologies related to Web references and 
retrieval, outlining the methodology we followed, presenting the 
results obtained, and discussing their implications.
NO ID: 757
UL 
http://portal.acm.org/ft_gateway.cfm?id=602422&type=pdf&coll=GUIDE&dl=G
UIDE&CFID=41042927&CFTOKEN=24990681

RT Journal
ID 3530
A1 Spink,Amanda
T1 Information seeking and mediated searching study. Part 3. Successive 
searching
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 9
SP 716
OP 727
AB Our project has investigated the processes of mediated information 
retrieval (IR) searching during human information-seeking processes to 
characterize aspects of this process, including information seekers' 
changing situational contexts; information problems; uncertainty 
reduction; successive searching, cognitive styles; and cognitive and 
affective states. The research has involved observational, longitudinal 
data collection in the United States and the United Kingdom. Three 
questionnaires were used for pre- and postsearch interviews: reference 
interview, information-seeker postsearch, and search intermediary 
postsearch questionnaires. In addition, the Sheffield team employed a 
fourth set of instruments in a follow-up interview some 2 months after 
the search. A total of 198 information seekers participated in a 
mediated on-line search with a professional intermediary using the 
Dialog Information Service. Each mediated search process was audiotaped 
and search transaction logs recorded. The findings are presented in 
four parts. Part I presents the background, theoretical framework, 
models, and research design used during the research. Part II is 
devoted to exploring changes in information seekers' uncertainty during 
the mediated process. Part III provides results related to successive 
searching. Part IV reports findings related to cognitive styles, 
individual differences, age and gender. Additional articles that 
discuss further findings from this complex research project, including: 
(1) an integrated model of information seeking and searching, (2) 
assessment of mediated searching, and (3) intermediary information-
seeker communication, are in preparation and will be published 
separately.
NO ID: 749
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/93518462/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3531
A1 Spink,Amanda
T1 Information Seeking and Mediated Searching. Part 2. Uncertainty and 
Its Correlates
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 9
SP 704
OP 715
AB This article explores the relationship between the concept of 
uncertainty in information seeking, within a model of the problem-
solving process proposed by Wilson (1999a) and variables derived from 
other models and from the work of Ellis and Kuhlthau. The research has 
involved longitudinal data collection in the United States and United 
Kingdom employing three interview schedules (incorporating self-
completed questionnaires) used for pre- and postsearch interviews: and 
postsearch interviews with the information seeker and the search 
intermediary. In addition, the Sheffield team employed a fourth set of 
instruments in a follow-up interview some 2 months after the search. 
Related search episodes, with a professional search intermediary using 
the Dialog Information Service and other sources were audiotaped, and 
search transaction logs were recorded. The mediated search clients were 
faculty and research students engaged in either personal or externally 
supported research projects. The article concludes that the problem 
solving model is recognized by such researchers as describing their 
activities and that the uncertainty concept, operationalized as here, 
serves as a useful variable in understanding information-seeking 
behavior. It also concludes that Ellis's concept of search 
characteristics and Kuhlthau's information-seeking stages are 
independent of the problem stage, and that a set of affective 
variables, based on those of Kuhlthau, appear to signify a generalized 
positive or negative affective orientation towards the course of the 
information problem solution.
NO ID: 750
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/93516215/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3532
A1 Spink,Amanda
A1 Ford,Nigel
A1 Wilson,T. D.
A1 Foster,Allen
A1 Ellis,David
T1 Information seeking and mediated searching. Part 4. Cognitive styles 
in information seeking
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 9
SP 728
OP 735
AB This is the fourth in a series resulting from a joint research 
project directed by Professor Tom Wilson in the United Kingdom and Dr. 
Amanda Spink in the United States. The analysis reported here sought to 
test a number of hypotheses linking global/analytic cognitive styles 
and aspects of researchers' problem-solving and related information-
seeking behavior. One hundred and eleven postdoctoral researchers were 
assessed for Witkin's field dependence/independence using Riding's 
Cognitive Styles Analysis and for Pask's holist/serialist biases using 
items from Ford's Study Processes Questionnaire. These measures were 
correlated with the researchers' perceptions of aspects of their 
problem-solving and information-seeking behavior, and with those of the 
search intermediary who performed literature searches on their behalf. 
A number of statistically significant correlations were found. Field-
independent researchers were more analytic and active than their field-
dependent counterparts. Holists engaged more in exploratory and 
serendipitous behavior, and were more idiosyncratic in their 
communication than serialists.
NO ID: 751
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/93518461/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3533
A1 Spink,Amanda
A1 Wilson,T. D.
A1 Ford,Nigel
A1 Allan,Foster
A1 Ellis,David
T1 Information-seeking and mediated searching. Part 1. Theoretical 
framework and research design
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 9
SP 695
OP 703
AB Our project has investigated the processes of mediated information 
retrieval (IR) searching during human information-seeking processes to 
characterize aspects of this process, including information seekers' 
changing situational contexts; information problems; uncertainty 
reduction; successive searching, cognitive styles; and cognitive and 
affective states. The research has involved observational, longitudinal 
data collection in the United States and United Kingdom. Three 
questionnaires were used for pre- and postsearch interviews: reference 
interview, information seeker postsearch, and search intermediary 
postsearch questionnaires. In addition, the Sheffield team employed a 
fourth set of instruments in a follow-up interview some 2 months after 
the search. A total of 198 information seekers participated in a 
mediated on-line search with a professional intermediary using the 
Dialog Information Service. Each mediated search process was audio 
taped and search transaction log recorded. The findings are presented 
in four parts. Part I presents the background, theoretical framework, 
models, and research design used during the research. Part II is 
devoted to exploring changes in information seekers' uncertainty during 
the mediated process. Part III provides results related to successive 
searching. Part IV reports findings related to cognitive styles, 
individual differences, age and gender. Additional articles that 
discuss further findings from this complex research project, including: 
(1) an integrated model of information seeking and searching, (2) 
assessment of mediated searching, and (3) intermediary-information 
seeker communication, are in preparation and will be published 
separately.
NO ID: 748
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/93515225/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3536
A1 St. Clair,Gloriana
A1 Magrill,Rose Mary
T1 Undergraduate use of four library collections: format and age of 
materials
JF Collect Build
YR 1992
VO 11
IS 4
SP 2
OP 15
K1 Descriptor: Citation analysis.
K1 Use studies -- College and university libraries
AB Descriptor: Citation analysis. Use studies -- College and university 
libraries. Citation analysis of undergraduate papers at four 
institutions in Texas, Oregon and Iowa
NO BLIB93000528 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0160-4953 Details: 
bibl charts. article feature article; ID: 468

RT Journal
ID 3534
A1 St. Clair,Gloriana
A1 Magrill,Rose Mary
T1 Incomplete citations in undergraduate term papers from four campuses
JF RQ
YR 1990
VO 30
SP 75
OP 81
K1 Descriptor: Bibliographical citations -- Evaluation
AB Descriptor: Bibliographical citations -- Evaluation.
NO BLIB90013324 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0033-7072 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 469

RT Journal
ID 3535
A1 St. Clair,Gloriana
A1 Magrill,Rose Mary
T1 Undergraduate term paper citations
JF Coll Res Libr News
YR 1990
FD Jan.
IS 1
SP 25
OP 28
K1 Descriptor: Bibliographical citations -- Evaluation
AB Descriptor: Bibliographical citations -- Evaluation.
NO BLIB90004157 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0099-0086 Details: 
charts. article feature article; ID: 471

RT Journal
ID 3537
A1 St. Lifer,Evan
T1 Tapping into the Zen of Marketing
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 2001
VO 126
IS 8
SP 44
OP 46
AB The lakewood Public Library in Ohio hired a marketing specialist. He 
develop a report that would help the library meet the needs of a 
specific target group, Generation Xers. Other public libraries and 
their activities are discussed.
NO ID: 331

RT Journal
ID 3541
A1 Stankus,Tony
T1 Spam and Spam-Lite: A Parable About Retaining Science Department 
Loyalties During the Transition from Print to Electronic Journals
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1997
VO 17
IS 1
SP 87
OP 92
NO ID: 711

RT Book, Whole
ID 3539
A1 Stankus,Tony
T1 Science librarianship at America's liberal arts colleges: working 
librarians tell their stories
YR 1992
SP 137
AB College listed were Vassar, Esther L. Williams -- Hampshire College, 
Helaine Selin -- Buckness University, James A. Van Fleet -- Augustana 
College (IL), Jeanne R. Davidson -- Wesleyan University, Penny Russman 
-- Franklin & Marshall College, Charles Myers -- Oberlin College, 
Allison Scott Ricker -- Williams College, Helena F. Warburg, Marcella 
Rauscher -- Holy Cross, Tony Stankus. This book is republished from 
Science & Technology Libraries, volume 12, issue 3, 1992.
NO ID: 669
PB Haworth Press
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1560243570

RT Book, Whole
ID 3540
A1 Stankus,Tony
T1 Making sense of journals in the physical sciences: from specialty 
origins to contemporary assortment
YR 1992
AB Acquisition of scientific publications, Acquisition of serial 
publications, Libraries -- Special collections -- Physical sciences, 
Physics, Chemistry -- Periodicals -- Bibliography -- Methodology, 
Scientific libraries -- Collection development.
NO ID: 670
PB Haworth Press
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1560241802

RT Book, Whole
ID 3538
A1 Stankus,Tony
T1 Scientific journals: improving library collections through analysis 
of publishing trends
YR 1990
AB Acquisition of scientific publications. Acquisition of serial 
publications. Libraries -- Special collections -- Scientific 
literature. Periodicals -- Publishing. Science -- Periodicals -- 
Bibliography -- Methodology. Science publishing. Scientific libraries -
- Collection development.
NO ID: 671
PB Haworth Press
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0866569057

RT Journal
ID 3542
A1 Stankus,Tony
A1 Rice,Barbara
T1 Handle with Care: Use and Citation Data for Science Journal 
Management
JF Collection Management
YR 1982
VO 4
IS 1/2
SP 95
OP 110
AB Science journal managers should exercise care in preparing data for 
testing correlations between use and citation data. Correlations should 
be sought only among journal of fairly similar subject specialty, 
scope, purpose, language rather than among journals in a broad field, 
eg. science overall. Either gross citation ranking or impact factor 
will usually correlate well with sue use, except in cases where a 
journal is either new or characteristically publishes a few papers.
NO ID: 442

RT Journal
ID 3543
A1 Stanley,Nancy Markle
T1 The case for acquiring and accessing elelctronic journals in 
libraries
JF Collection Management
YR 1995
VO 19
IS 3/4
SP 29
OP 34
AB Provides arguments why libraries should make available both free and 
fee based electronic serials and why it is imperative that they move 
quickly. Features discussions of the costs of acquiring and storing 
materials, customers services, and the future of libraries. Includes 
strategies that libraries could use to continue to exist into the next 
century and millenium.
NO ID: 86

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3544
A1 Starr,Susan
T1 For better or for worse? Electronic formats for disseminating 
scientific information
YR 1997
AB Many scientists find current paper-based systems for distributing 
scientific information to be too slow and too expensive. Current 
systems also often fail to encourage the collaboration scientists need, 
and they may produce more information than researchers can easily 
digest. New electronic formats promise to ameliorate some of these 
problems, but they may well create others. We can judge the efficacy of 
both current and proposed formats for scientific communication by 
analyzing their potential to fill three major functions: dissemination, 
preservation, and quality control. Three major new formats will be 
discussed: electronic journals, web-based publishing schemes, and the 
electronic invisible college. The strengths and weaknesses of these 
formats will be analyzed and compared to other even newer proposals for 
changing the means by which scientific information is distributed.
NO Presented at the 1997 ALA Conference - STS section of ACRL. Session 
- "The Scientific Researcher: Hardwired for Retrieval or Wedded to 
Print?"; ID: 247
T2 ALA Conference
PP San Francisco
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/sts/pro-susan.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 3545
A1 Steen,Lynn Arthur
T1 Library recommendations for undergraduate mathematics
YR 1992
SP 194
NO ID: 863
PB Mathematical Association of AmericaSteen, Lynn Arthur
PP Washington, DC
SN 0883850761
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0883850761

RT Book, Whole
ID 3546
A1 Steinke,Cynthia
T1 Information Seeking and Communicating Behavior of Scientists and 
Engineers
YR 1991
K1 communication in science, communication of technical information, 
scientists, engineers, engineering
NO ET: 1st; Q223.I49 1991Also published as - Science & Technology 
Libraries, Vol. 11, Issue 3, 1991; ID: 162
PB Haworth Press
PP New York
SN 1-56024-135-7

RT Book, Whole
ID 3547
A1 Steinke,Cynthia
T1 Information seeking and communicating behavior of scientists and 
engineers
YR 1991
SP 155
AB Has also been published as Science & technology libraries, volume 
11, number 3, 1991. The Information-Seeking Habits and Practices of 
Engineers; Physics Information and Scientific Communication: 
Information Sources and Communication Patterns; Geologists and Gray 
Literature: Access, Use, and Problems; The Cold Fusion Story: A Case 
Study Illustrating the Communication and Information Seeking Behavior 
of Scientists; Informal Communication Among Scientists and Engineers: A 
Review of the Literature; The Information Quest as Resolution of 
Uncertainty: Some Approaches to the Problem; Meeting the Academic and 
Research Information Needs of Scientists and Engineers in the 
University Environment; Physical Structure and Administration of 
Science and Technology Libraries: An Historical Survey; Academic 
Science and Technology Libraries: Facilities and Administration; 
Radioactive Waste Management and Disposal: Information Sources
NO ID: 858
PB Haworth PressSteinke, Cynthia
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i1560241357

RT Journal
ID 3548
A1 Sterling,Bruce
T1 The digital revolution in retrospect
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 21 pages.
SP 79
K1 Information technology
K1 Technological change
K1 Social impact
K1 (9000) Short article
K1 (5200) Communications & information management
K1 (1200) Social policy
AB Soon the much-trumpeted Information Age will be history. The 
Information Age has accomplished great work during its space on the 
historical stage, dissolving jobs, transforming industries, building 
and destroying great fortunes. However, almost every manifestation of 
what is called new media would be better described as temporary media.
NO ID: 114

RT Journal
ID 3550
A1 Stern,David
T1 Open Access or Differential Pricing for Journals: The Road Best 
Traveled?
JF Online
YR 2005
VO 29
IS 2
AB Open access (OA) is becoming a reality, with new cost models under 
development. The various cost models will have serious short- and long-
term implications for libraries and dangerously impact the scholarly 
communication network. I believe that the adoption of the OA model for 
journals will create serious instabilities within the existing 
scholarly publication industry. OA, as a business model, is neither 
necessary nor desirable. With or without the often-discussed author 
charges approach, it would be almost impossible to obtain the same 
amount of total revenue through selected libraries as now exists from 
the much larger base of library subscriptions. Tiered or differential 
pricing (and services) among the existing subscribers would be a far 
more logical approach to supporting a modified scholarly journal 
distribution network.
NO ID: 809
UL http://www.infotoday.com/online/mar05/Stern.shtml

RT Journal
ID 3549
A1 Stern,David
T1 New search and navigation techniques in the digital library
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1999
VO 17
IS 3/4
SP 61
OP 80
AB The introduction of technology into library information systems has 
provided new and enhanced search powers in the following areas: the 
speed of searching large individual and federated databases, keyword 
access, access to value-added metadata, customized interfaces (that 
relieve the burden of difficult techniques for sophisticated options), 
combinatorics for citation and semantic analysis, post-search relevancy 
analysis, release from the cost recovery scenario, and smart agent 
assistance. These advances save time, provide new research 
possibilities, and create new data relationships and research areas. 
However, there are still many areas in which improvements are needed: 
filters for handling information overload, cross-database searching 
standards, subject schema normalization, and balancing the need for 
subject-specific customization and cross-disciplinary standardization. 
Regardless of the technological advances, there will always be a need 
for critical thinking skills in order to perform an adequate research 
search.
NO ID: 821
UL 
http://www.haworthpress.com/store/ArticleAbstract.asp?sid=6TM53LXHQ6989
HJG9W5RB8S98AKEBK49&ID=3367

RT Book, Section
ID 3551
A1 Stevens-Rayburn,Sarah
T1 'If it's not on the Web, it doesn't exist at all': Electronic 
Information Resources -- Myth and Reality
YR 1998
VO ASP Conference Series volume 153; ASP Conference Series volume 153
SP 195
OP 203
AB In this paper, we review the current status of astronomical research 
via electronic means, with an eye towards separating the hype from the 
hypothetical in hopes of revealing the actual state of affairs. We will 
review both anecdotal and scholarly work aimed at documenting the state 
of research using the World Wide Web and demonstrate that although 
there is enormous potential in electronic research, much of that 
potential is as yet unrealized. In addition, especially in astronomy, a 
significant amount of material is not (yet) available electronically 
and likely will never be. Finally, we will point out the potential 
danger of a looming paradigm shift in the way astronomers conduct 
research and the possible consequences thereof.
NO ID: 576
A2 Grothkopf,U.
A2 Andernach,H.
A2 Stevens-Rayburn,S.
A2 Gomez,M.
T2 Library and Information Services in Astronomy III
PB American Society of the Pacific
UL http://www.stsci.edu/stsci/meetings/lisa3/stevens-rayburns.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 3552
A1 Strauch,Katina
T1 Charleston Conference proceedings, 2001
YR 2002
SP 222
AB Here are some interesting articles -- Trends They Are A'Changing / 
Tom Sanville Cross-Ref: Status Update, New Developments / Amy Brand 
Revolution or Evolution? Digital Myths and Journal Futures: Sifting 
Fact From Fiction / Michael A. Mabe (Elsevier) Digital Information 
Player: We Have the Data But Not Yet the Understanding / David 
Nicholas, Anthony Watkinson LOCKSS: Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe: 
Creating a Permanent Web Publishing and Access System / Vicky Reich 
Debate: Resolved, The Only Remaining Purpose of the Library is as a 
Social Center / David Goodman, Chuck Hamaker Collection Development 
Trends and Issues in Health Science Libraries / Ramune Kubilius Book is 
Dead: Citation Rates in the Humanities and Social Sciences / John 
McDonald Is Collaboration an Unnatural Act? / Tom Peters
NO ID: 733
PB Libraries Unlimited
PP Westport, CT

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3553
A1 Subramanian,Dan
T1 Users: How do they seek information
YR 2005
AB This poster will present the findings of a user survey of chemistry 
undergraduate students conducted at the University of Mississippi. The 
main purpose of this study was to examine user needs, preferences, 
priorities, and satisfaction level of the Science Library collections 
and services. This is part of a long-term project which will be 
expanded to sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students. The 
survey questions were distributed to the freshmen during their 
chemistry laboratory sessions. The survey had questions that would 
identify users’ information seeking habits and how often they use 
library resources. The questions revealed how often the students used 
the web to seek information. The survey also identified the most 
frequently used search engines by the students. I am anticipating a 
lively discussion of the results
NO ID: 838
T2 SLA Annual Conference
PP Toronto, ONT
UL http://www.sla.org/division/dche/2005/subramanian.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3554
A1 Sun,Irene Y.
T1 Pre-students
JF The Harvard Crimson
YR 2005
FD February 11
AB So here I am, beginning my fourth semester at Harvard by shopping 
zero science classes. I still love learning about how life works, but I 
can’t stomach the thought of continuing to learn it with the attitude 
that I’ve encountered here. My conceptions of my peers, as well as of 
intellectual life at Harvard, have been thrown into turmoil. I now 
question the value of intellectual passion in a world that seems 
increasingly to be based on grades, course requirements and career 
prospects. I question the effectiveness and sensibility of our 
cutthroat GPA and exam-based academic structure. But I also question 
the mindset of science professors and of my fellow students. At what 
point did professors automatically expect that their students studied 
their subject matters because of career requirements rather than 
intellectual appeal? Why are so many of my fellow students so hell-bent 
on requirements instead of passion? What happened to that sense of 
academic adventure, excitement and curiosity?
NO ID: 760
UL http://www.thecrimson.com/printerfriendly.aspx?ref=505618

RT Journal
ID 3555
A1 Sutcliffe,A. G.
A1 Ennis,M.
A1 Watkinson,S. J.
T1 Empirical studies of end-user information searching
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 13
SP 1211
OP 1231
AB An empirical investigation of information retrieval (IR) using the 
MEDLINE[Note 1] database was carried out to study user behaviour, 
performance and to investigate the reasons for suboptimal searches. The 
experimental subjects were drawn from two groups of final year medical 
students who differed in their knowledge of the search system (i.e., 
novice and expert users). The subjects carried out four search tasks 
and their recall and precision performance was recorded. Data was 
captured on the search strategies used, duration, and logs of submitted 
queries. Differences were found between the groups for the performance 
measure of recall in only one of the four experimental tasks. Overall 
performance was poor. Analysis of strategies, timing data, and query 
logs showed that there were many different causes for search failure or 
success. Poor searchers either gave up too quickly, employed few search 
terms, used only simple queries, or used the wrong search terms. Good 
searchers persisted longer, used a larger, richer set of terms, 
constructed more complex queries, and were more diligent in evaluating 
the retrieved results. However, individual performances were not 
correlated with all of these factors. Poor performers frequently 
exhibited several factors of good searcher behaviour and failed for 
just one reason. Overall end-user searching behaviour is complex and it 
seems that just one factor can cause poor performance, whereas good 
performance can result from suboptimal strategies that compensate for 
some difficulties. The implications of the results for the design of IR 
interfaces are discussed.
NO ID: 225
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/73001732/START

RT Book, Section
ID 3556
A1 Sutton,Lynn
T1 Collaborating with Our Patrons: Letting the Users Select
YR 2003
AB Collection development librarians in academic libraries have long 
prided themselves on their professional role of making selection 
decisions for library materials. The art and science of collection 
development is well documented in library literature and cherished in 
library practice. Intellectual preparation for good collection 
development includes knowledge of the subject matter, knowledge of the 
user population, and analysis of usage patterns of existing material. 
However, the resulting collections may be questioned in terms of 
success, given that according to established estimates (Hardesty 1981; 
Kent et al. 1979) nearly half the monographs in a typical academic 
library collection never circulate.
NO ID: 587
A2 Thompson,Hugh A.
T2 Learning to make a difference : proceedings of the Eleventh National 
Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, April 
10-13, 2003, Charlotte, North Carolina
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Chicago
UL http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlevents/lsutton.PDF

RT Journal
ID 3557
A1 Swartz,B. J.
T1 Biology serials: a useful and continuing, though statistically 
inaccurate, study at the Rutgers - Camden library
JF New Jersey Libraries
YR 1987
VO 20
IS Spring
SP 14
OP 17
K1 Periodicals, Biological. biology, journals
K1 College and university libraries -- Serial publications. serials
K1 Periodicals -- Selection.
K1 Use studies -- Serial publications.
K1 Camden Arts & Science Library
NO ID: 195

RT Journal
ID 3558
A1 Swigger,Boyd Keith
A1 Wilkes,Adeline W.
T1 The use of citation data to evaluate serials subscriptions in an 
academic library
JF Ser Rev
YR 1991
VO 17
IS 2
SP 41
OP 46, 52
AB Texas Women's University, College and university libraries -- Serial 
publications. Serial publications -- Subscriptions. Citation analysis. 
Mary Evelyn Blagg-Huey Library.
NO BLIB91013840 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0098-7913 Details: 
bibl charts. article feature article; ID: 440

RT Journal
ID 3559
A1 Sykes,Jan
T1 Measuring Our Value So We Can Market It
JF Information Outlook
YR 2001
VO 5
IS 3
SP 15
AB Short article that focusses on "misdirected efforts", "low 
visibility", and "unmeasured results" of corporate libraries.
NO ID: 332

RT Journal
ID 3561
A1 Sylvia,Margaret J.
T1 Citation analysis as an unobtrusive method for journal collection 
evaluation using psychology student research bibliographies
JF Collect Build
YR 1998
VO 17
IS 1
SP 20
OP 28
AB Citation analysis. Collection development -- Evaluation. College and 
university libraries -- Serial publications. Texas. Use studies, 
Periodicals, Psychology. St. Mary's University.
NO BLIB98003675 Provider: OCLC; United Kingdom ISSN: 0160-4953 Details: 
bibl charts. article feature article; ID: 459

RT Journal
ID 3560
A1 Sylvia,Margaret
A1 Lesher,Marcella
T1 What journals do psychology graduate students need? A citation 
analysis of thesis references
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 1995
FD July
VO 56
IS 4
SP 313
AB Presents information on a study conducted by the Academic Library, 
Saint Mary's University, San Antonio, Texas, which used various 
collection evaluation methods, to develop a basis for psychology 
journal selection in the library. Why the three collection methods 
utilized in the study were chosen; Purpose of the study; Results 
obtained.
NO ID: 375

RT Journal
ID 3562
A1 Szalay,Alexander
A1 Gray,Jim
T1 World-Wide Telescope
JF Science
JO Science
YR 2001
VO 293
IS 5537
SP 2037
OP 2040
NO ID: 267

RT Journal
ID 3564
A1 Szava-Kovats,Endre
T1 Indirect-Collective Referencing (ICR) in the Elite Journal 
Literature of Physics. II. A Literature Study on the Level of 
Communications
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 1
SP 47
OP 56
AB In the author's three previous articles dealing with the ICR 
phenomenon (JASIS, 49, [1998], 477-481; 50, [1999], 1284-1294; JASIST, 
52, [2001], 201-211) the nature, life course, and importance of this 
phenomenon of scientific literature was demonstrated. It was shown that 
the quantity of nonindexed indirect-collective references in The 
Physical Review now alone exceeds many times over the quantity of 
formal references listed in the Science Citation Index as citations. It 
was shown that the ICR phenomenon is present in all the 44 elite 
physics journals of a representative sample of this literature. The 
bibliometrically very heterogeneous sample is very homogeneous 
regarding the presence and frequency of the ICR phenomenon. However, no 
real connection could be found between the simple degree of 
documentedness and the presence and frequency of the ICR phenomenon on 
the journal level of the sample. The present article reports the 
findings of the latest ICR investigation carried out on the level of 
communications of the representative sample. Correlation calculations 
were carried out in the stock of all 458 communications containing the 
ICR phenomenon as a statistical population, and within this population 
also in the groups of communications of the normal and the letter 
journals, and the short communications. The correlation analysis did 
not find notable statistical correlation between the simple and 
specific degree of documentedness of a communication and the number of 
works cited in it by ICR act(s) either in the total population or in 
the selected groups. There is no correlation either statistical or real 
(i.e., cause-and-effect) between the documentedness of scientific 
communications made by their authors and the presence and intensity of 
the ICR method used by their authors. However, in reality there exists 
a very strong connection between these two statistically independent 
variables: both depend on the referencing author, on his/her 
subjectivity and barely limited subjective free will. This subjective 
free will shapes the stock of the formal-direct references of 
scientific communications, thereby placing the achievements cited in 
this way and their creators into the (indexed) showcase of present Big 
Science. The same free will decides on the use or nonuse of the ICR 
method, and in the case of use also on the intensity with which the 
method is used.
NO ID: 746
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/88013343/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3563
A1 Szava-Kovats,Endre
T1 Indirect-collective referencing (ICR) in the elite journal 
literature of physics. I. A literature science study on the journal 
level
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2001
VO 52
IS 3
SP 201
OP 211
AB In the author's previous article (JASIS, 50, [1999], 1284-1294) it 
was shown that the quantity of nonindexed indirect-collective 
references in the representative elite general physics journal, The 
Physical Review, now alone exceeds many times over the quantity of 
references taken into account by the ISI as citations and listed in the 
Science Citation Index. The present article reports the findings of a 
new ICR investigation carried out in a representative sample of the 
elite journal literature of physics: in the January 1997 issue of 44 
source journals covering the domain of physics, i.e., in 2,662 
scientific communications of 38 normal and 6 letter journals. The 
methods of the investigation were most rigorous, and consequently, only 
the indisputable minimum of the literature phenomenon examined was 
revealed. It is demonstrated that the ICR phenomenon is present in all 
source journals processed of bibliometrically very heterogeneous 
nature, in both the normal and the letter journals. The frequency of 
the generally occurring ICR phenomenon is very high: it is found in 
17.2% of the sample. There is very little scattering in the rate of 
frequency: it is 17.0% in the group of normal journals and 17.9% in the 
letter journals. The bibliometrically very heterogeneous representative 
sample is very homogeneous regarding the presence and frequency of the 
ICR phenomenon. On the basis of these facts it can be stated that the 
quantity of nonindexed indirect-collective references in the elite 
physics journal literature now alone exceeds many times over the 
quantity of references listed in the Science Citation Index. The 
meaning of this fact and its logical consequences must be taken into 
consideration in the evaluation of results of sciento- and other -
metrics studies based only on the reference stock of the Citation 
Indexes.
NO ID: 747
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/76505129/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3565
A1 Talbot,Dawn E.
A1 Lowell,Gerald R.
A1 Martin,Kerry
T1 From the Users' Perspective-- The UCSD Libraries User Survey Project
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 1998
VO 24
IS 5
SP 357
OP 364
AB The University of California, San Diego Libraries conducted its 
first comprehensive user survey in 1996. This article describes the 
user-driven survey methodology, its successes and failures, and 
conclusions about the survey process. The survey provided valuable 
benchmark data and has led to improved services for users.
NO ID: 828
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(98)90072-6

RT Journal
ID 3566
A1 Tamber,P. S.
A1 Godlee,F.
A1 Newmark,P.
T1 Open access to peer-reviewed research: making it happen
JF Lancet
JO Lancet
YR 2003
VO 362
IS 9395
SP 1575
OP 1577
AB At the start of 2003, the Public Library of Science announced that 
it had secured funds to enable it to launch two high-level open-access 
journals.[1] The first issue of PLoS Biology was published in October, 
2003, and the launch of PLoS Medicine is scheduled for mid 2004. This 
iniative, welcomed by many, arose from the failure of the library's 
original mission to persuade major publishers to convert existing 
subscription journals to open access. Here, we summarise the arguments 
that all scientific research should be freely and immediately available 
online.
NO ID: 583
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(03)14748-4

RT Journal
ID 3567
A1 Taylor,Anneliese
T1 The IEEE/IEE Electronic Library Online
JF Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship
YR 1999
IS 23
AB The IEEE/IEE Electronic Library (IEL) Online provides Internet 
access to the full text of the non-monographic publications of U.S.' 
Insitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (http://www.ieee.org/) 
and U.K.'s Institution of Electrical Engineers (http://www.iee.org/). 
IEEE and Information Handling Services (IHS) 
(http://www.ihsengineering.com/) developed the online version of IEL 
and released it on November 2,1998. IHS is the exclusive distributor 
for IEL.
NO ID: 192

RT Journal
ID 3568
A1 Taylor,Mary
A1 Hudson,Diane E.
T1 "Linkrot" and the usefulness of Web site bibliographies
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 2000
FD Spring
VO 39
IS 3
SP 273
OP 277
K1 Descriptor: Web sites -- Evaluation.
K1 Internet addresses
AB This article examines whether outdated URLs are still a problem and 
to what extent they decrease the usefulness of paper bibliographies and 
reviews of Web sites. The authors make specific recommendations that 
bibliographers and Web site authors can use to increase the probability 
of users finding Web sites that may have relocated, thus improving the 
long term utility of Web site bibliographies.
NO BLIB00007800 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 0033-7072 Details: 
bibl f tab. article feature article; ID: 496

RT Report
ID 3572
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Increasing Effective Student Use of the Scientific Journal 
Literature : A project of the NSF National Science Digital Library 
(NSDL) Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Education 
Digital Library
YR 2003
AB This NSF-NSDL project's main objective is to discover and test what 
system, interface and learning enhancements will help improve 
electronic journal systems to encourage sustained use by undergraduate 
students. This report comes in several parts -- 
http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/nsf/nsf_report_final_vol_1.pdf, 
http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/nsf/nsf_report_final_vol_2.pdf, 
http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/nsf/nsf_phase2_vol1_final.pdf, 
http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/nsf/nsf_phase2_vol2_final.pdf, 
http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/nsf/nsf_phase3_final.pdf
NO ID: 617
T3 Tertiary Increasing Effective Student Use of the Scientific Journal 
Literature : A project of the NSF National Science Digital Library 
(NSDL) Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics, and Education 
Digital Library
UL http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/nsf/presentations.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 3573
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Use and users of electronic library resources : an overview and 
analysis of recent research studies
YR 2003
SP 72
AB In the last several years, many research studies have focused on how 
people use electronic resources or on their feelings about electronic 
and print resources in the library. These usage studies draw many 
conclusions about the behavior and preferences of library users, 
although sometimes the conclusions are contradictory or unclear. This 
report for the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) 
summarizes and analyzes more than 200 recent research publications that 
focus on the use of electronic library resources and were published 
between 1995 and 2003. Eight major ongoing studies (each with multiple 
publications) are identified as Tier 1 studies and are analyzed in 
detail, while about 100 smaller-scale studies are classified as Tier 2 
studies and are examined together.
NO ID: 736
PB Council on Library and Information Resources
PP Washington, DC
UL http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub120/contents.html

RT Journal
ID 3571
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Moving toward electronic journals
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 2000
VO 125
IS 12
SP 36
AB PRINT STILL PREDOMINATES in journal publishing, but that role may 
soon fade. Too slowly or too quickly, steadily or in fits and starts 
(depending on your perspective and patience level), scholarly journals 
are moving toward reliance on digital forms. This is happening in part 
because librarians, scholars, and even some publishers are unhappy 
about the current state of print journals. Critics complain of high 
prices, delays between writing and dissemination, and the limitations 
of the paper format in terms of length, distribution, and presentation 
of data. Still, journals remain the most important part of the 
scholarly communication process and that value must not be sacrificed 
in a digital world.
NO ID: 725
UL http://0-
search.epnet.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&
an=3332586

RT Journal
ID 3569
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Should we cancel print?
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 1999
VO 124
IS 14
SP 138
AB Discusses the issue of libraries subscribing to print and digital 
journals. Recommended books, `Directory of Electronic Journals, 
Newsletters, and Academic Discussion Lists,' edited by Dru Mogge; 
`Fulltext Sources Online,' edited by Donald T. Hawkins and Mary B. 
Glose; Aggregators of electronic journals providing access to titles 
from a variety of publishers; Characteristics of Category 1-5 journals; 
Patron preference for the full-text version.
NO ID: 724
UL http://0-
search.epnet.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&
an=2232501

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3570
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Factors That Influence Online Database Use
YR 1999
SP X
OP Y
AB This paper reports on a two-phase study of academic libraries to 
identify patterns of database use and what subtle factors might 
influence this use. Online data from 96 academic libraries reveal how 
often and when selected databases are used. Usage data do not show what 
each library is doing to encourage (or discourage) use of these 
databases, however, so usage data were supplemented with a survey. The 
survey questionnaire asked each library about their specific 
environment for online access and gathered information about what 
factors influence online use.
NO ID: 737
T2 Racing toward tomorrow : proceedings of the Ninth National 
Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, April 
8-11, 1999
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Detroit
UL www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlevents/tenopir99.pdf

RT Book, Whole
ID 3579
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald W.
T1 Communication patterns of engineers
YR 2004
AB 1 Introduction 2 Communication Models 3 Communications Framework for 
Engineers 4 Engineering Profession and Communication 5 Engineers' 
Information Seeking and Use 6 Factors Affecting Information Seeking and 
Use 7 Information Output by Engineers 8 Engineering Education and 
Communication Skills 9 Engineering Scholarly Journal Channel 10 
Engineers' Journal Information-Seeking and Reading Patterns in an 
Emerging Electronic Era 11 Engineering Communication Patterns Compared 
with Science and Medicine 12 NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion 
Research Project
NO ID: 719
PB John Wiley
PP Hoboken, NJ
SN 047148492X
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/bookhome/108568003

RT Journal
ID 3578
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald W.
T1 Lessons for the future of journals
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2001
VO 413
IS 6857
SP 672
OP 673
NO ID: 262

RT Journal
ID 3577
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald W.
T1 The Use and Value of Scholarly Journals
JF Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting
YR 2000
VO 37
SP 60
OP 62
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Scientific and Technical Information
K1 Readership Analysis
K1 Futures (of Society)
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Surveys
AB Summarizes results of 13,591 readership survey responses of 
scientists and reviews of hundreds of other readership studies reported 
in a recent book. Highlights include scientific scholarly journal 
readership defined; the usefulness and value of scholarly journals; 
information seeking patterns; and implications for the future. 
(Contains 6 references.) (Author/LRW)
NO EJ618400; 0160-0044(2000)372.0.TX;2-Y Paper presented at the Annual 
Meeting of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS) (63rd, 
Chicago, IL, November 12-16, 2000). English 0160-0044 2000 60 2000 
Journal Article (CIJE) a IR543081 CIJJUN2001 080 Journal Articles 143 
Reports--Research; ID: 408
UL http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/speeches/asist_03_2001_no1.ppt

RT Book, Section
ID 3576
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald W.
T1 Designing the future of electronic journals with lessons learned 
from the past: economic and use patterns of scientific journals
YR 1998
NO ID: 368
T2 Socioeconomic Dimensions of Electronic Publishing Workshop : 
proceedings : meeting the needs of the engineering and scientific 
communities : Santa Barbara, CA, USA, 23-25 April, 1998 /
PB IEEE
PP Piscataway, NJ

RT Journal
ID 3580
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Boyce,Peter
A1 Grayson,Matt
A1 Zhang,Yan
A1 Ebuen,Mercy
T1 Patterns of journal use by scientists through three evolutionary 
phases
JF D-Lib Magazine
YR 2003
VO 9
IS 5
AB Access to electronic journals and articles has involved three system 
phases: an early phase following introduction of electronic journals; 
an evolving phase in which a majority of scientific journals are 
available in electronic format, new features are added to some 
journals, and some individual articles are made available through 
preprint archives, author web sites, etc; and an advanced phase in 
which searching capabilities, advanced features, and individual 
articles are integrated in a complete system along with full text of 
core journals available back to their origin. This article provides 
some evidence of how scientists' information seeking and reading 
patterns are affected by using journals in these three system phases. 
Readership surveys of scientists shed some light on how the three 
phases affected use, usefulness and value of articles read; where 
articles are obtained; the format of articles read; how they were 
found; and the age of articles read.
NO ID: 675
UL http://www.dlib.org/dlib/may03/king/05king.html

RT Journal
ID 3581
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald W.
A1 Bush,Amy
T1 Medical faculty's use of print and electronic journals: changes over 
time and in comparison with scientists
JF Journal of the Medical Library Association
YR 2004
VO 92
IS 2
SP 233
OP 241
AB Objectives: The objectives are to determine how medical faculty 
members use scholarly journals, whether print or electronic journals 
are read more, whether there is a pattern among types of users, and 
what similarities and differences there are between the use of journals 
by medical faculty and faculty in other disciplines. Methods: Medical 
faculty of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) 
multi-campus system were surveyed, and their responses estimated using 
critical incident technique to characterize the different aspects of 
their use of print and electronic journals. Results: Medical faculty 
read a great deal, especially compared to scientists. The most 
frequently reported principal purpose of reading is to support their 
primary research (30% of reading). The majority of reading comes from 
recently published articles, mostly from personal subscriptions. 
Medical faculty continue to rely on print journals (approximately 70% 
of readings) versus electronic journals. Age of faculty does not appear 
to influence the choice of print or electronic format. Medical faculty 
read more articles than others on average and need information digested 
and verified in a way to save them time. Convenience and currency are 
highly valued attributes. Conclusions: It can be asserted that 
librarians and publishers must find ways to provide the attributes of 
convenience and currency and match the portability of personal 
subscriptions in an electronic journal format for medical faculty.
NO ID: 557
UL http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=385305

RT Journal
ID 3575
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald Ward
T1 Trends in scientific scholarly journal publishing in the United 
States
JF Journal of Scholarly Publishing
YR 1997
VO 28
IS 3 (April)
SP 135
OP 170
K1 Special Libraries Association Awards.
K1 Periodicals, Scientific and technical.
K1 Scholarly publishing.
K1 Publishers and publishing Scientific and technical literature.
K1 Periodicals Statistics.
K1 Steven I. Goldspiel memorial research grant
NO ID: 123

RT Journal
ID 3574
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 King,Donald Ward
T1 Setting the record straight on journal publishing: myth vs. reality
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 1996
VO 121
IS Mar. 15
SP 32
OP 35
K1 Publishers and publishing Serial publications.
K1 Periodicals Statistics
NO ID: 124

RT Journal
ID 3582
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 Read,Eleanor
T1 Patterns of Database Use in Academic Libraries
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 2000
VO 61
IS 3
SP 234
OP 246
AB Usage data from a random sample of academic libraries of selected 
types throughout the US and Canada were examined. Findings indicate 
that users use commercial online databases the most frequently during 
midday, early in the week, and at times that correspond to the busy 
times in the academic calendar.
NO ID: 571
UL 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlpubs/crljournal/backissues2000b/may00/c
andrlmay2000.htm

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3583
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 Pollard,Richard
T1 Undergraduate science students and electronic scholarly Journals
YR 2003
SP 291
OP 297
AB NSF Digital Library project used focus groups to determine how 
undergraduate science students perceive journal literature and how they 
use digital library resources. Their perceptions and use are contrasted 
with faculty and graduate teaching assistants in engineering, chemsitry 
and physics. Undergraduates have difficulties understanding journal 
articles. Although they consider themselves experts on the web, they 
rarely use online indexes or e-journals unless required to for class.
NO ID: 615
T2 Proceedings of the 66th ASIST Annual Meeting
UL http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/nsf/nsf_asist_051403.pdf

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3584
A1 Tenopir,Carol
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 Pollard,Richard
A1 Zhang,Yang
A1 Simmons,Beverly
T1 Use of Electronic Science Journals in the Undergraduate Curriculum: 
An Observational Study
YR 2004
AB NSF Digital Library project observed undergraduate and graduate 
engineering, chemsitry, and physics students and faculty while they 
searched the ScienceDirect e-journals system for scholarly science 
journal articles for simulated class-related assignments. Preliminary 
analysis shows differences in search patterns among undergraduates, 
graduates and faculty.
NO ID: 614
T2 Proceedings of the 67th ASIST Annual Meeting
UL http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/eprints/asist_2004_final.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3585
A1 Testi,Andrea
A1 Bordeianu,Sever
T1 Staff exchange in reference services
JF Reference Services Review
YR 1993
VO 21
IS 4
SP 7
AB Explores the problems and opportunities encountered in implementing 
staff exchange programs among different reference departments of a 
multi branch academic library. Implements a formal staff exchange based 
on specific goals, training, evaluation, and equitable workloads result 
in improved communication, collaboration among departments, uniformity 
of service, and improved staff morale.
NO ID: 87

RT Journal
ID 3586
A1 Thelwall,Mike
A1 Harries,Gareth
T1 Do the Web sites of higher rated scholars have significantly more 
online impact?
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 2
SP 149
OP 159
AB The quality and impact of academic Web sites is of interest to many 
audiences, including the scholars who use them and Web educators who 
need to identify best practice. Several large-scale European Union 
research projects have been funded to build new indicators for online 
scientific activity, reflecting recognition of the importance of the 
Web for scholarly communication. In this paper we address the key 
question of whether higher rated scholars produce higher impact Web 
sites, using the United Kingdom as a case study and measuring scholars' 
quality in terms of university-wide average research ratings. 
Methodological issues concerning the measurement of the online impact 
are discussed, leading to the adoption of counts of links to a 
university's constituent single domain Web sites from an aggregated 
counting metric. The findings suggest that universities with higher 
rated scholars produce significantly more Web content but with a 
similar average online impact. Higher rated scholars therefore attract 
more total links from their peers, but only by being more prolific, 
refuting earlier suggestions. It can be surmised that general Web 
publications are very different from scholarly journal articles and 
conference papers, for which scholarly quality does associate with 
citation impact. This has important implications for the construction 
of new Web indicators, for example that online impact should not be 
used to assess the quality of small groups of scholars, even within a 
single discipline.
NO ID: 658
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106561107/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3587
A1 Thilmany,Jean
T1 Too much information: Organizing information—after gathering it in 
the first place—is the key to actually using it
JF Mechanical Engineering
JO Mech.Eng.
YR 2003
FD June
VO 125
IS 6
SP 44
AB As anyone with a Web browser and a little Internet-surfing 
experience knows, saying there's a lot of information floating around 
out there is like saying the ocean is a little bit wet. Tracking down 
the specifics of any given topic at a moment's notice—whether it's the 
ingredients for a chocolate velvet cake or Ronald Reagan's middle name—
the early 21st century's birthright is the ability to find out just 
about anything without venturing too far from a personal computer. But, 
as mavens of the Google search engine already realize, the 
unprecedented levels of information access can easily overwhelm. 
Engineers aren't exempt from the need to walk a fine line between 
information access and information overload. Whether they think about 
it or not, they create reams of new information each day as they work 
on, analyze, test, and possibly discard designs.
NO ID: 753
UL 
http://www.memagazine.org/backissues/june03/features/toomuch/toomuch.ht
ml

RT Book, Whole
ID 3588
A1 Thomas,Charles F.
T1 Libraries, the Internet, and scholarship: tools and trends 
converging
YR 2002
SP 217
AB Libraries and Digital Preservation: Who Is Providing Electronic 
Access for Tomorrow? / Kelly Russell 1 2 Internet, Scholarly 
Communication, and Collaborative Research / Rosemary L. Meszaros 31 3 
From Virtual Libraries to Digital Libraries: The Role of Digital 
Libraries in Information Communities / David Robins 45 4 Integrating 
Metadata Frameworks into Library Description / William Fietzer 77 5 
Technology's Impact on Research and Publication in the Natural Sciences 
/ David P. Atkins, Flora G. Shrode 103 6 Electronic Text Encoding in 
the Humanities / Perry Willett 133 7 Visual Resources Collections and 
Technology / Paula Hardin 155 8 Introduction to Geographic Information 
Systems / Farrell W. Jones 169 9 Social Science Data and the Digital 
Library / Wendy L. Thomas 191
NO ID: 856
PB Marcel DekkerThomas, Charles F
PP new York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/cZ692.C65+L535+2002

RT Journal
ID 3589
A1 Thomas,Joy
T1 Graduate Student Use of Journals: A bibliometric Study of Psychology 
Theses
JF Behavioral and Social Sciences Librarian
YR 1993
VO 12
IS 1
SP 1
OP 7
AB A 17% reduction in the library materials budget and faculty 
resistance to journal cancellations neccessitated a demonstration of 
journal usage in a large academic library [California State University, 
Long Beach]. The author did an analysis of citations from theses.
NO ID: 365

RT Journal
ID 3590
A1 Thomes,Kate
T1 The economics and usage of digital library collections. Conference 
at the University of Michigan, March 2000
JF ARL Bimonthly Report
YR 2000
IS 210
SP 5
OP 7
K1 http://www.si.umich.edu/PEAK-2000/
K1 http://www.jstor.org/
K1 http://www.arl.org/sparc/
AB The conference on "The Economics and Usage of Digital Library 
Collections," held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 23-24 March 2000, and 
sponsored by the Program for Research on the Information Economy and 
the University Library at the University of Michigan, provided an 
opportunity for an international group of librarians, publishers, and 
economists to speak on the economics and usage of digital collections. 
The conference also marked the conclusion of the PEAK project, a four-
year study of digital collection pricing models and user behavior 
sponsored by the University of Michigan. The PEAK report was one of 16 
presentations on a variety of research studies and practical 
applications of pricing and distribution models, economic analyses, 
user behavior studies, and the impact of digital libraries on 
traditional library operations. The full text of most of the papers 
presented is available, along with more information about the speakers 
and projects, from the conference website at . This article summarizes 
the main themes that emerged from the conference.
NO ID: 199
UL http://www.arl.org/newsltr/210/econ.html

RT Book, Whole
ID 3591
A1 Thompson,Hugh A.
T1 Learning to make a difference : proceedings of the Eleventh National 
Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, April 
10-13, 2003, Charlotte, North Carolina
YR 2003
SP 342
AB Includes chapters such as Faculty Views of the Transition from Print 
to Electronic Formats / Mark Sandler, Janet Palmer, Higher Education 
Environment and the Role of the Academic Library / John W. Shumaker, An 
"All" Electronic Journal Collection in a University Library: Two Years 
Later / Carol Hansen Montgomery, Donald W. King. Also available at 
http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlevents/nationalconference/conference11.
htm
NO ID: 589
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Chicago
SN 0838982263
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0838982263

RT Journal
ID 3592
A1 Thong,James Y. L.
A1 Hong,Weiyin
A1 Tam,Kar-Yan
T1 Understanding user acceptance of digital libraries: what are the 
roles of interface characteristics, organizational context, and 
individual differences?
JF International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
YR 2002
VO 57
IS 3
SP 215
OP 242
AB Digital library research efforts originating from library and 
information scientists have focused on the technical development. While 
millions of dollars have been spent on building "usable" digital 
libraries, previous research indicates that potential users may still 
not use them. This study contributes to understanding user acceptance 
of digital libraries by utilizing the technology acceptance model 
(TAM). Three system interface characteristics, three organizational 
context variables, and three individual differences are identified as 
critical external variables that have impact on adoption intention 
through perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use of the digital 
library. Data was collected from 397 users of an award-winning digital 
library. The findings show that both perceived usefulness and perceived 
ease of use are determinants of user acceptance of digital libraries. 
In addition, interface characteristics and individual differences 
affect perceived ease of use, while organizational context influences 
both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of digital 
libraries.
NO ID: 593
UL http://0-dx.doi.org.bianca.penlib.du.edu/10.1016/S1071-
5819(02)91024-4

RT Journal
ID 3593
A1 Thornton,Glenda A.
T1 Impact of electronic resources on collection development, the roles 
of librarians, and library consortia
JF Library Trends
YR 2000
VO 48
IS 4
SP 842
OP 856
AB As librarians added audiovisual materials to their collections and 
then electronic materials, they moved from selection as an individual 
activity to selection as a group activity. Librarians made every effort 
to mainstream the resulting selection process and incorporate it into 
the existing library organization. However, with the advent of the 
Internet and the ability to simultaneously share virtual resources, 
cooperative collection development, through consortial arrangements, 
became popular once again. The ability of consortia to purchase 
products at a better price than individual libraries can has made them 
very popular with funding agencies. However, the result is that the 
role of the selector has been diminished. As the purchase of virtual 
resources accelerates, particularly through consortial agreements, the 
autonomy of the local library will fade and the roles of librarians 
will change drastically. This rapid transformation is illustrated by a 
discussion of OhioLINK and its effects, both positive and negative, on 
one member library.
NO ID: 721

RT Journal
ID 3594
A1 Tidline,Tonyia J.
T1 The mythology of information overload
JF Library Trends
YR 1999
VO 47
IS 3
SP 485
OP 506
AB Library and information science work has often focused on the study 
of solutions to the effects of information overload. For this reason, 
and because the concept is frequently identified as a problem in 
popular culture, it is logical to assume that the existence and 
description of information overload has been documented through 
rigorous investigation. Such is not the case. This article looks at the 
functions of myth and brings together ideas about the information 
society, information, and information overload to conclude that 
information overload is a myth of modern culture. In this sense, myth 
is a "nonscientific" process that confirms the reality of an elusive 
phenomenon. The article also reports results of a pilot project 
intended to describe information overload experienced by a particular 
folk group composed of future library and information professionals. In 
addition to trying to enhance the description of information overload, 
the pilot project represents an attempt to test the idea of the folk 
group as a remedy for this condition.
NO ID: 741

RT Journal
ID 3595
A1 Todorov,Radosvet
A1 Glänzel,Wolfgang
T1 Journal citation measures: a concise review
JF J Inf Sci
JO J.Inf.Sci.
YR 1988
VO 14
IS 1
SP 47
OP 56
K1 Descriptor: Citation analysis.
K1 Periodicals, Scientific and technical.
K1 Named Corp: International Seminar on Information Research.
K1 Genre/Form: Speech
AB This is a new version of a paper presented by the first author at 
the International Seminar on Information Research. Focuses on physics 
journals.
NO BLIB88003414 Provider: OCLC; Netherlands ISSN: 0165-5515 Details: 
charts. article speech; ID: 457

RT Journal
ID 3596
A1 Tombros,Anastasios
A1 Ruthven,Ian
A1 Jose,Joemon M.
T1 How users assess Web pages for information seeking
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2005
VO 56
IS 4
SP 327
OP 344
AB In this article, we investigate the criteria used by online 
searchers when assessing the relevance of Web pages for information-
seeking tasks. Twenty-four participants were given three tasks each, 
and they indicated the features of Web pages that they used when 
deciding about the usefulness of the pages in relation to the tasks. 
These tasks were presented within the context of a simulated work-task 
situation. We investigated the relative utility of features identified 
by participants (Web page content, structure, and quality) and how the 
importance of these features is affected by the type of information-
seeking task performed and the stage of the search. The results of this 
study provide a set of criteria used by searchers to decide about the 
utility of Web pages for different types of tasks. Such criteria can 
have implications for the design of systems that use or recommend Web 
pages.
NO ID: 626
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/109858354/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3599
A1 Tompson,Sara R.
T1 A Tale of Two Worlds: High-Energy Physics Preprints in the 1990s
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2001
VO 19
IS 2
SP 43
OP 51
AB Preprints are the highest-in-demand, and often the shortest-lived, 
documents in the field of high-energy physics. In the 1990s, this 
document form was becoming increasingly available fulltext on the World 
Wide Web, and the Fermilab Information Resources Department needed also 
to make Fermilab preprints available electronically. In this paper, the 
author describes the processes the Department underwent in moving 
preprint delivery, access and storage largely (but not completely) out 
of the print realm and into the electronic realm. Challenges, 
milestones, and cost-savings are all discussed.
NO ID: 710
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v19n02_05&i=2&s=J122&v=19

RT Journal
ID 3598
A1 Tompson,Sara R.
T1 The ABC's of the Fermilab Library approval plan
JF Against the Grain
YR 2000
FD June 2000article feature article
VO 12
IS 3
SP 30
K1 Descriptor: Scientific and technical libraries -- Illinois.
K1 Scientific and technical literature -- Acquisitions.
K1 Approval plans.
K1 Named Corp: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
NO ID: 286

RT Journal
ID 3597
A1 Tompson,Sara R.
T1 Weeding a scitech monograph collection at the Fermilab Library
JF Sci-Tech News
YR 1999
FD Aug. 1999article feature article
VO 53
IS 3
SP 12
OP 13
K1 Descriptor: Scientific and technical libraries -- Illinois.
K1 Discarding of books, periodicals, etc.
K1 Scientific and technical libraries -- Book collections.
K1 Named Corp: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
NO ID: 285

RT Journal
ID 3600
A1 Town,William G.
A1 Vickery,Bryan A.
A1 Kuras,Jan
T1 Chemical E-journals, chemical E-preprints
JF Online Information Review
YR 2002
VO 26
IS 3
SP 164
OP 171
AB Chemists communicate in structures. The nature of information 
available to chemists therefore has to take this into account. With the 
migration from print to electronic publication nearly complete, the 
Internet offers the chemical information user many advantages. Journal 
articles are accessible quickly and easily from the desktop, long 
before their appearance in paper form. Additionally, research papers 
can now be uploaded to preprint servers before they even enter the 
publishing process. This paper discusses the many advantages this 
brings with it for chemists, but also discusses the disadvantages some 
may see as a possible result.
NO ID: 512

RT Book, Section
ID 3601
A1 Trefil,James
T1 Scientific literacy
YR 1996
VO 775; 775
SP 543
OP 550
NO ID: 258
A2 Gross,Paul R.
A2 Levitt,Norman
A2 Lewis,Martin W.
T2 The Flight from Science and Reason
PB New York Academy of Sciences
PP New York
T3 Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

RT Journal
ID 3602
A1 Tsay,Ming-Yueh
T1 Library journal use and citation age in medical science
JF Journal of Documentation
YR 1999
VO 55
IS 5
SP 543
OP 555
AB This study explores the in-house use age distribution of journals in 
the library of Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, their 
citation age distribution and the difference between them. The use 
study employed the sweep method and the study period lasted for six 
months. The citation age of each journal in this study was based on the 
data listed in the Science Citation Index, Journal Citation Reports, 
1993. The results of this study illustrate that the use age 
distribution for the mean of all the journals is an exponentially 
decaying curve. On the other hand, the citation age distributions show 
a sharp initial rise from age one to three or four years and then fall 
off in a sort of exponential decay; and the age of maximum citation is 
typically three years. About 80 per cent of uses are attributed to 
journals less than ten years old, while these journals contribute about 
70 per cent of total citations. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test 
indicates that the use age distribution does not fit the citation age 
distribution.
NO ID: 553

RT Journal
ID 3603
A1 Tsichritzis,Dennis
T1 How to surf the technology waves we created
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 26 pages.
SP 49
OP 54
K1 Computer industry
K1 Generations
K1 Technological change
K1 Professional development
K1 Human resource management
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (8302) Software & computer services industry
K1 (8651) Computer industry
K1 (6100) Human resource planning
AB Technology waves are hitting the computing profession in succession. 
Computers, communications, and media are coming together both 
technologically and as an economic sector. Everything being based on 
digital technology and the synergy of methods, attitudes, and 
technological approaches has yielded a great environment for 
professional fulfillment. Computing professionals are split into 5 
groups called generations: 1. the Fortran-Cobol-Card generation, 2. the 
OS-360-PL1-Mainframe generation, 3. the Unix-C-Minicomputer generation, 
4. the MS-DOS-Windows-PC generation, and 5. the Mail-Web-Internet 
generation. Each generation is profiled. The new generation of the 
future is also profiled. Some applications or tools for the new 
generation are: 1. imagination description language, 2. virtual 
character creation, 3. community forum moderation, and 4. Kansei 
services. However, it should not be forgotten that decisions about 
hiring, promoting, and firing are made by people. Some observations on 
personnel issues are presented.
NO ID: 118

RT Journal
ID 3604
A1 Ursin,Lara
A1 Lindsay,Elizabeth Blakesley
A1 Johnson,Corey M.
T1 Assessing library instruction in the freshman seminar: a citation 
analysis study
JF Reference Services Review
YR 2004
VO 32
IS 3
SP 284
OP 292
AB In light of the general emerging focus on assessment, it is 
imperative that librarians develop effective methods for evaluating 
their instructional endeavors. This study involved analyzing the 
frequency with which Washington State University Freshman Seminar 
students used items from librarian-constructed resource guides. In 
addition, the researchers evaluated the quality of Web sites used in 
the freshman seminar final projects. Regardless of the information 
format and special treatment to place resource guide items at their 
fingertips, students largely did not use the librarian-recommended 
resources. Citation analysis of the student Web sites exhibited a broad 
spectrum of quality levels and raised key questions about Web site 
evaluation. Ideas for improving student resource selection are 
discussed.
NO ID: 627
UL http://hermia.emeraldinsight.com/vl=305925/cl=66/nw=1/rpsv/cgi-
bin/linker?ini=emerald&reqidx=/cw/mcb/00907324/v32n3/s8/p284

RT Journal
ID 3605
A1 User Access to Services Committee,RUSA Machine-Assisted Reference 
Section (MARS)
T1 Users' information-seeking behavior: what are they really doing? A 
bibliography
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 2001
FD Spring
VO 40
IS 3
SP 240
OP 250
K1 Descriptor: Library science literature -- Bibliography.
K1 Information needs -- Bibliography
AB The 1990s were a decade of profound change in the way library users 
went about seeking information and accessing materials, both within the 
walls of the library and beyond. At the beginning of the decade, 
individual CD-ROM workstations and the tape-loading of databases to be 
searched through library OPAC systems were beginning to lure users away 
from the printed periodical indexes that for decades had been the 
mainstay of many research trips to the library. Few at that time had 
heard of anything called the Web, and access to full-text resources, 
except perhaps through a Lexis-Nexis or Dialog password likely to be in 
the possession of a librarian, meant print or microform.
NO BLIB01006050 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1094-9054 article 
bibliography; ID: 495

RT Journal
ID 3606
A1 van Dam,Andries
T1 Post-WIMP user interfaces
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 25 pages.
SP 63
OP 67
K1 User interface
K1 r&d
K1 Technological change
K1 Predictions
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (5240) Software & systems
K1 (5400) Research & development
AB The history of progress in user interface design is characterized by 
4 distinguishable styles. In the first period, the early 1950s and 
1960s, computers were used in batch mode with essentially no user 
interfaces. The period of the early 1960s through early 1980s was the 
era of timesharing on mainframes and minicomputers with user interfaces 
for the first time. During the 1970s at Xerox PARC, the third age of 
user interfaces dawned. Raster graphics-based networked workstations 
and point-and-click WIMP GUIs (graphical user interfaces based on 
windows, icon, menus, and a pointing device, typically a mouse) are the 
legacy of Xerox PARC. The newer forms of computing and computing 
devices available today necessitate new thinking about fourth 
generation UIs, or post-WIMP user interfaces. The advantages and 
disadvantages of WIMP GUIs are discussed. Post-WIMP user interfaces 
should contain at least one interaction technique not dependent on 
classical 2D widgets such as menus and icons.
NO ID: 113

RT Journal
ID 3607
A1 van der Geer,Gerard
T1 We can make a change
JF Notices of the American Mathematical Society
YR 2004
FD May
VO 51
IS 5
SP 493
AB Publishing history of the journal _Compositio Mathematica_. A new 
period for the journal arrived with the managing editorship of Frans 
Oort, who brought the journal back in the 1970s to a high level. 
Mumford’s famous Compositio papers on the compactification of moduli of 
curves and abelian varieties mark that change. I became managing editor 
in 1993, succeeding Jozef Steenbrink. I became worried about the 
regular price increases that Kluwer Academic Publishers, the successor 
of Noordhoff, imposed. These price increases threatened the orderly 
systems that had governed publishing in mathematics (and other sciences 
as well) for many years. So we considered options.
NO ID: 779
UL http://www.ams.org/notices/200405/commentary.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3608
A1 Van Dinter,Nancy
T1 PR in the Special Library
JF Idaho Librarian
YR 1993
VO 45
IS January
SP 17
OP 18
AB She demonstrates that "to insure support, librarians have to provide 
data to managers and administrators the vital role that the library 
plays in the organization, and they must do this often." She discusses 
some public relations and promotion techniques that have worked at 
various special and medical libraries.
NO ID: 333

RT Journal
ID 3609
A1 van Orsdel,Lee
T1 Big Chill on the Big Deal? (Periodicals Price Survey 2003)
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 2003
FD April 15
VO X
IS X
SP X
AB In a year filled with financial scandals of worldwide proportions, 
the serials market experienced its own outrage. Late in December, 
library customers of RoweCom/Faxon, an old and established serials 
vendor, woke up to find that the money they had paid for 2003 
subscriptions had been allegedly siphoned off by divine, inc., 
RoweCom's parent company. As of this writing, about $73 million in 
payments are missing and presumed lost, leaving hundreds of libraries 
without assured journal orders and headed to court. Has average journal 
prices for all kinds of different disciplines. This is the Periodicals 
Price Survey for 2003.
NO ID: 752
UL http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA289187

RT Journal
ID 3611
A1 Van Orsdel,Lee C.
A1 Born,Kathleen
T1 Choosing Sides (Periodicals Price Survey 2005)
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 2005
FD April 15
SP 43
OP 48
AB Periodical Price survey 2005 -- The scholarly communications market, 
which exploded last year with headline-grabbing news of research 
libraries balking at publisher deals, governments investigating the 
scientific publishing system, and reformers touting author-pays 
business models, has settled into an uneasy state of relative calm. On 
the surface, not a lot has changed. Fleets of salespeople continue to 
push bundles of journal content from the big STM (scientific, 
technical, and medical) publishers, and budget-starved libraries 
continue to cut journals they can't afford. Beneath the surface, 
however, the tide of change runs strong.
NO ID: 835
UL http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA516819.html

RT Journal
ID 3610
A1 van Orsdel,Lee
A1 Born,Kathleen
T1 Periodicals Price Survey 2004: Closing in on Open Access
JF Library Journal
JO Libr.J.
YR 2004
FD April 15
AB In the last year, the anger and frustration simmering in libraries 
for a decade or more over the growing dysfunction of the scholarly 
communications system found a voice, a cause, and a cadre of allies 
around the globe. This time, the voices that said, "No" to the Big 
Deals were those of faculty members and academic officers at some very 
prestigious institutions—Cornell, Harvard, the Research Triangle 
institutions in North Carolina, MIT, and, for a time, the University of 
California. Theirs were the "no's" heard round the world when the 
mainstream press, intrigued no doubt by the image of academics 
defiantly waving nonrenewal letters in the face of corporate giants 
like Elsevier, picked up the stories. These universities spoke for many 
when they declared their intent to choose journal titles the old-
fashioned way—year by year, title by title, based on the value of the 
content rather than the size of the package.
NO ID: 790
UL 
http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA408358?display=searchResults&st
t=001&text=journal

RT Dissertation/Thesis
ID 3612
A1 Vaughan,K. T. L.
T1 Methods for Journal Collection Evaluation in Academic Science 
Libraries
YR 2001
SP 50
K1 Academic libraries, Use studies, Collection development.
K1 Scientific science libraries management
AB The frustration many librarians feel when faced with cancellation 
decisions is understandable; at the time cuts are announced it is 
unlikely that a library will have fresh data reflecting journal value. 
If a number of practical methods for analysis can be shown to be 
effectively equal, librarians will be free to choose the method that is 
most appropriate to each particular situation. This study compares the 
main three methods used in most science libraries: reshelving data, 
citation analysis, and the ISI impact factor rankings. Using the 
Spearman correlation coefficient, it is found that reshelving and 
citation analyses generate the most similar ranked list of journals. It 
is recommended that librarians combine results from both methods in 
order to capture a more complete picture of journal value.
NO ID: 341
T2 Library and Information Science
PB University of North Carolina, Chapel HillEditor
PP Chapel Hill, NC
UL http://ils.unc.edu/MSpapers/2697.pdf

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3613
A1 Vaughan,Liwen
A1 Shaw,Debora
T1 Can Web citations be a measure of impact? An investigation of 
journals in the life sciences
YR 2004
SP 516
OP 526
AB We examine traditional and Web citations to journal articles in 
biology and genetics. There is significant correlation between 
citations in these two formats. Journals with higher numbers of Web 
citations tend to have more citations indicating intellectual impact 
(citations from papers or class readings, in contrast to citations from 
bibliographic services or the author’s or journal’s home page). Web 
citations show a broader geographic coverage and capture a greater 
number and variety of uses of journal articles.
NO ID: 639
T2 Proceedings of the 67th ASIS&T Annual Meeting, vol. 41

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3614
A1 Viele,Pat
T1 Understanding the research and teaching needs of physics faculty
YR 2005
AB Provides ideas for the top 10 ways to understand their research 
needs.
NO ID: 839
T2 SLA Annual Conference
PP Toronto, ONT
UL http://www.sla.org/division/dche/2005/viele.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3615
A1 Vinkler,Peter
T1 Characterization of the Impact of Sets of Scientific Papers: The 
Garfield (Impact) Factor
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 5
SP 431
OP 435
AB The Garfield (Impact) Factor (GF) is one of the most frequently used 
scientometric indicators. In the present article it is shown that the 
main factors determining the value of the mean GF representing a set of 
journals are the number of articles published recently (articles 
referencing) related to those published in a previous time period 
(articles to be referenced) and the mean number of references in 
journal papers referring to the time period selected. It has been 
proved further that GF corresponds to the mean chance for citedness of 
journal papers. A new indicator, Specific Impact Contribution (SIC), is 
introduced, which characterizes the contribution of a subset of 
articles or a journal to the total impact of the respective articles or 
journals. The SIC index relates the share of a journal in citations 
divided by that in publications within a set of papers or journals 
appropriately selected. It is shown, however, that the normalized GFs 
of journals and the normalized SIC indicators are identical measures 
within any set of journals selected. It may be stated therefore that 
Garfield Factors of journals (calculated correctly) are appropriate 
scientometric measures for characterizing the relative international 
eminence of journals within a set of journals appropriately selected. 
It is demonstrated further that SIC indicators (and so GF indexes) 
correspond to the (number of citations per paper) indicators generally 
used, within the same set of papers.
NO ID: 650
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/107061910/ABSTRACT

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3618
A1 Von Seggern,Marilyn
T1 Seeing the Forest, the Trees, and the Species Communities
YR 1997
AB The information-seeking habits of scientists and engineers are 
impacted by changes in the research environment. More research is 
crossing disciplinary boundaries to draw methods, techniques, and 
information from other communities. Communication of all kinds is 
undergoing rapid change due to electronic advances, and the results can 
be seen in the increase of collaboration and collaboratories, a 
decrease in interaction time, a move from print to electronic 
publications, and other trends. Change effected by technological 
innovation comes to science and engineering disciplines at varying 
rates and with different consequences. As information professionals 
adapt access and services to the changing environment, the differing 
characteristics of individuals and groups of researchers as well as 
"the bigger picture" should be taken into account.
NO Presented at the 1997 ALA Conference - STS section of ACRL. Session 
- "The Scientific Researcher: Hardwired for Retrieval or Wedded to 
Print?"; ID: 251
T2 ALA Conference
PP San Francisco
UL http://www.ala.org/acrl/sts/pro-marilyn.html

RT Journal
ID 3617
A1 Von Seggern,Marilyn
T1 Technical communications in engineering and science: the practices 
within a government defense laboratory
JF Special libraries
JO Spec.Libr.
YR 1996
FD Spring
VO 87
IS 2
SP 98
OP 119
AB Presents information on a survey conducted with engineers and 
scientists within a single Air Force research and development 
laboratory, about their information strategies, usage and production 
practices. Response of military employees as oppose to civilian staff; 
Effect of the Phillips Laboratory's stated mission on engineers and 
scientists; Identification of factors which influenced variations on 
technical communication and information-related activities.
NO ID: 370

RT Journal
ID 3616
A1 Von Seggern,Marilyn
T1 Scientists, Information Seeking, and Reference Services
JF Reference Librarian
YR 1995
IS 49/50also published in the book Library Users and Reference 
Services.
SP 95
OP 104
AB Discusses the information-seeking behavior of scientists and some 
reasons for their use. Examples of user-oriented service; Heavy 
reliance on informal communication and personal collections for 
research on the information-seeking behavior; Prerequisites for 
librarians before playing an integral role in managing and delivering 
information.
NO ID: 369

RT Journal
ID 3619
A1 Voss,David
T1 Better Searching Through Science
JF Science
JO Science
YR 2001
VO 293
IS 5537
SP 2024
OP 2026
NO ID: 269

RT Journal
ID 3620
A1 Walcott,Rosalind
T1 Local Citation Studies -- A Shortcut to Local Knowledge
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 1994
VO 14
IS 3
SP 1
OP 14
AB A new biology librarian at Stony Brook was faced with a substantial 
serials cut. The author wanted to quickly obtain some 'local knowledge' 
concerning the users of the biology library. One large segment of the 
user group is graduate students and it was decided to study their needs 
by investigating the pattern of citations in their thesis and 
dissertations completed in the years 1989-1992.
NO ID: 364

RT Journal
ID 3621
A1 Walgate,Robert
T1 UK risks 'losing science data': British Library says its digital 
storage plan is critical to underpin science
JF The Scientist
YR 2004
AB Lynne Brindley, chief executive of the British Library, sought the 
support of the UK House of Commons Select Committee for Science and 
Technology yesterday (April 21) for a £12 million, 2-year investment at 
the library, to create a long-term national depository for digital 
scientific information and publications. The depository is “absolutely 
critically to underpin science,” said Brindley. “Without this, we will 
lose increasing amounts of scientific data, and it will mean the UK 
will not be world class in this area.” In a briefing document, the 
British Library said a large amount of scientific information is now 
being published exclusively in digital formats. “Much of this data is 
published informally and is inherently ephemeral. Unless archives begin 
to systematically identify, capture, and map this data, it will simply 
disappear.”
NO ID: 782
UL http://www.biomedcentral.com/news/20040422/04

RT Book, Section
ID 3622
A1 Walker,Richard Dean
A1 Ahn,Myeonghee Lee
T1 The literature cited by water resources researchers
YR 1995
SP 67
OP 77
AB Periodicals -- Indexes and abstracts. Citation analysis. 
Periodicals, Environmental. Selected Water Resources Abstracts, 
Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, CSA.
NO ID: 423
A2 Haner,Barbara E.
A2 O'Donnell,Jim
T2 Changing gateways: the impact of technology on geoscience 
information exchange - Geoscience Information Society. Meeting (29th 
:1994 :Seattle, Wash.)
PB Geoscience Information Society

RT Journal
ID 3623
A1 Walker,Thomas J.
T1 Free internet access to traditional journals
JF American Scientist
JO Am.Sci.
YR 1998
VO 86
IS 5
K1 electronic publishing, internet library, scientific journals, 
economics of publishing, html, pdf files
AB Can scientists find ways to share published research without high 
costs? The experience of one society suggest it can be done cheaply, 
even profitably.
NO ID: 90

RT Journal
ID 3624
A1 Walsh,John P.
A1 Kucker,Stephanie
A1 Maloney,Nancy G.
A1 Gabbay,Shaul
T1 Connecting minds: Computer-mediated communication and scientific 
work
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 14
SP 1295
OP 1305
AB This article summarizes the preliminary findings from a recent study 
of scientists in four disciplines with regard to computer-mediated 
communication (CMC) use and effects. Based on surveys from 333 
scientists, we find that CMC use is central to both professional and 
research-related aspects of scientific work, and that this use differs 
by field. We find that e-mail use focuses on coordination activities, 
and its biggest effect is helping to integrate scientists into 
professional networks. We do not find gender differences in use, but 
there is some evidence that e-mail is having a differential, positive 
effect for women. Furthermore, CMC use is positively associated with 
scientific productivity and collaboration.
NO ID: 209
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/75000092/START

RT Journal
ID 3625
A1 Walsh,Robert R.
T1 Branch library planning in universities
JF Library Trends
YR 1969
IS October
SP 210
OP 222
K1 harvard branch libraries
NO ID: 91

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3628
A1 Wang,Peiling
T1 Finding Information on the Web: Incorporating User Behaviors in 
Digital Libraries (Poster Paper)
YR 2004
SP 1
OP 4
AB This paper reports briefly a comprehensive observational study of 
users’ interactions with the Web in finding factual information. 
Subjects’ cognitive styles (EFT), affective states (STAI), and 
computing experiences were collected prior to the session. The searches 
were captured as a video recording (continuous screen shots of actions) 
along with concurrent verbalizations. The results show how searchers 
moved in Web spaces, their problems, their strategies and tactics, and 
the emotions along the process. The findings have important 
implications for incorporating user-Web interaction behaviors in 
digital libraries (DLs).
NO ID: 613
T2 7th International Conference on Asian Digital Libraries
PP Shanghai, China
UL http://web.utk.edu/~peilingw/icadl2004poster.pdf

RT Book, Section
ID 3627
A1 Wang,Peiling
T1 Methodologies and methods for user behavioral research
YR 1999
VO 34; 34
SP 53
OP 99
NO ID: 642
T2 Annual review of information science and technology
PB Information Today, Inc
PP Medford, NJ

RT Dissertation/Thesis
ID 3626
A1 Wang,Peiling
T1 A cognitive Model of document selection of real users of information 
retrieval systems
YR 1994
SP 248
AB Purpose. This is an exploratory study to examine document selection 
behavior of real users of bibliographic information retrieval (IR) 
systems. The purpose of the study is to build a model of the document 
selection process which can be used in improving the design of IR 
systems. Methods. Twenty-five faculty and students from an academic 
department submitted search requests related to their work. After a 
reference interview, the researcher conducted online searches on 
DIALOG. The retrieved documents were printed out in full record format 
and presented to the users for selection. Participants went through the 
list and selected documents in the presence of the researcher; they 
were asked to read and think aloud. These concurrent verbal reports 
were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed. Results. Document 
selection is conceptualized as a decision-making process in which users 
process document information elements (DIEs), apply criteria, and make 
decisions on whether the retrieved documents should be obtained. 
Document selection is situational, multidimensional, dynamic, and 
cognitive. Four document values adapted from the consumer choice 
literature are tentatively supported by the data: epistemic value, 
functional value, social value, and conditional value. Users employed 
the following criteria, listed by decreasing importance; DIEs and 
personal knowledge used to judge each criterion are given in 
parentheses: topicality (title, abstract, geographic location), 
orientation/level (title, abstract, author, journal), quality (author, 
journal, document type), subject area (author's subject area, journal), 
novelty (title, author), recency (publication date), authority 
(author), and relation/origin (author). The combinations of DIEs used 
and their sequencing varied from user to user and for the same user 
from document to document. To minimize cognitive effort, users apply 
decision rules in processing information and in balancing decisions 
among alternatives: elimination, multiple criteria, dominance, 
scarcity, "satisfice," and chain rules. Implications. These results 
suggest that the DIEs should be displayed to support document selection 
decisions; search output should be organized to facilitate decisions. A 
knowledge-based system incorporating knowledge about authors, 
organizations, journals, and subjects, including evaluations specific 
to each individual user, can help users in both document selection and 
IR.
NO ID: 618
T2 Library Science
PB University of MarylandEditor
PP College Park, MD
UL http://0-
proquest.umi.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu:80/pqdweb?did=741564281&sid=1&Fmt
=2&clientId=48347&RQT=309&VName=PQD

RT Journal
ID 3629
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 Berry,Michael W.
A1 Yang,Yiheng
T1 Mining longitudinal web queries: Trends and patterns
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2003
VO 54
IS 8
SP 743
OP 758
AB This project analyzed 541,920 user queries submitted to and executed 
in an academic Website during a four-year period (May 1997 to May 2001) 
using a relational database. The purpose of the study is three-fold: 
(1) to understand Web users' query behavior; (2) to identify problems 
encountered by these Web users; (3) to develop appropriate techniques 
for optimization of query analysis and mining. The linguistic analyses 
focus on query structures, lexicon, and word associations using 
statistical measures such as Zipf distribution and mutual information. 
A data model with finest granularity is used for data storage and 
iterative analyses. Patterns and trends of querying behavior are 
identified and compared with previous studies.
NO ID: 611
UL http://0-www3.interscience.wiley.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu/cgi-
bin/abstract/104525889/ABSTRACT

RT Book, Section
ID 3630
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 Bownas,Jennifer
A1 Berry,Michael W.
T1 Trend and behavior detection from Web queries
YR 2004
NO QA76.9.D343 S69 2004; ID: 644
T2 Survey of text mining: clustering, classification, and retrieval
PB Springer
PP New York
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0387955631

RT Journal
ID 3631
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 Hawk,William B.
A1 Tenopir,Carol
T1 Users' interaction with World Wide Web resources: an exploratory 
study using a holistic approach
JF Information Processing and Management
YR 2000
VO 36
IS 2This is a revision and expansion of the contributed paper: Peiling 
Wang et al. (1998) An exploratory study of user searching of the World 
Wide Web: a holistic approach. Proceedings of the 61st Annual Meeting 
of the American Society for Informat(TRUNCATED)
SP 229
OP 251
AB This paper presents the first part of the research on user–Web 
interaction: a multidimensional model, methodology, and general 
findings. The objectives of this study are three-fold: (1) to explore 
factors of user–Web interaction in finding factual information and what 
happens during this interaction; (2) to develop a conceptual framework 
for studying user–Web interaction; and (3) to apply a process-tracing 
method for conducting holistic user–Web studies. The proposed model 
consists of three components: user, interface, and the World Wide Web. 
User–Web interaction is viewed as a communication process facilitated 
through an interface. A process-tracing technique has been designed to 
capture the processes of user-Web interactions. Twenty-four graduate 
students participated in this study. Prior to the interaction, each 
participant was given a questionnaire to report his/her computer and 
Web experience, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (form Y1 and form Y2) 
to measure affective states, and an individually administered Embedded 
Figure Test to measure cognitive style. Each participant used the Web 
to find answers to two factual questions. Both the processes 
(continuous screen shots) and the concurrent verbalizations of thoughts 
were recorded in synchronized video–audio data. The findings provided 
rich information on users’ cognitive, affective and physical behaviors. 
The proposed model is used to present the findings of user behavior in 
connections with interfaces and the Web.
NO ID: 616
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4573(99)00059-X

RT Journal
ID 3632
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 Kracker,Jacqueline
T1 Research anxiety and students' perceptions of research: An 
experiment. Part II. Content analysis of their writings on two 
experiences
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 4
SP 295
OP 307
AB This is Part II of an experimental study investigating students' 
perceptions of research and research paper anxiety. The study 
integrates quantitative and qualitative designs to collect 
complimentary data. The participants were students in four sections of 
an upper division undergraduate course on technical and professional 
writing during the fall of 1999. A survey instrument used the Critical 
Incident Technique to solicit writings in students' own words about a 
memorable past research and writing experience at the beginning of the 
semester and the current research and writing at the end of the 
semester. The quantitative part of the survey measured students' 
perceptions about research using a questionnaire with five-point Likert 
scale, and students' anxiety levels using a standard state anxiety test 
(STAI Y-1). The first article, Part I, provides a detailed description 
of the experimental design and reports on quantitative results. This 
article reports on content analysis of students' writings about their 
experiences of the two research projects. Analysis of the data 
confirmed Kuhlthau's Information Search Process (ISP) model and 
revealed additional affective and cognitive aspects related to research 
and writing.
NO ID: 610
UL http://0-www3.interscience.wiley.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu/cgi-
bin/abstract/89015613/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3633
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 Soergel,Dagobert
T1 A cognitive model of document use during a research project. Study 
I. Document selection
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1999
VO 49
IS 2
SP 115
OP 133
AB This article proposes a model of document selection by real users of 
a bibliographic retrieval system. It reports on Part 1 of a 
longitudinal study of decision making on document use by academics 
during an actual research project. (Part 2 followed up the same users 
on how the selected documents were actually used in subsequent stages.) 
The participants are 25 self-selected faculty and graduate students in 
Agricultural Economics. After a reference interview, the researcher 
conducted a search of DIALOG databases and prepared a printout. The 
users selected documents from this printout; they were asked to read 
and think aloud while selecting documents. Their verbal reports were 
recorded and analyzed from a utility-theoretic perspective. The 
following model of the decision-making in the selection process 
emerged: document information elements (DIEs) in document records 
provide the information for judging documents on 11 criteria (including 
topicality, orientation, quality, novelty, and authority); the criteria 
judgments are combined in an assessment of document value along five 
dimensions (epistemic, functional, conditional, social, and emotional 
values), leading to the use decision. This model accounts for the use 
of personal knowledge and decision strategies applied in the selection 
process. The model has implications for the design of an intelligent 
document selection assistant.
NO ID: 609
UL http://0-www3.interscience.wiley.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu/cgi-
bin/abstract/5000132/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3634
A1 Wang,Peiling
A1 White,Marilyn Domas
T1 A cognitive model of document use during a research project. Study 
II. Decisions at the reading and citing stages
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 1999
VO 50
IS 2
SP 98
OP 114
AB This article reports on the follow-up study of a two-part project 
designed to study the decision-making process underlying how academic 
researchers select documents retrieved from online databases, consult 
or read, and cite documents during a research project. The participants 
are 15 of the 25 agricultural economics users who participated in the 
original study of document-selection conducted in 1992. They were 
interviewed about subsequent decisions on documents considered relevant 
and selected in 1992, as well as documents cited in their written 
products but not in the original searches. Of particular interest in 
this article are the decision criteria and rules they apply to 
documents as they progress through the project. The first study in 1992 
emphasized the selection processes and resulted in a document selection 
model; the 1995 study concentrates on the reading and citing decisions. 
The model derived from this project shows document use as a decision-
making process with decisions occurring at three points or stages 
during a research project: selecting, reading, and citing. It is an 
expansion of the document selection model developed in the 1992 study, 
identifies more criteria, and clarifies the criteria and rules that are 
in use at each stage. The follow-up study not only found that all but 
one of the criteria identified in selection re-occur in connection with 
reading and citing decisions, but also identified 14 new criteria. It 
also found that decision rules applied in selection decisions are 
applied throughout the project.
NO ID: 608

RT Journal
ID 3635
A1 Ward,Martin
T1 A survey of engineers in their information world
JF Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
YR 2001
VO 33
IS 4
SP 168
OP 176
AB Reports results of a questionnaire survey of 27 Principal Engineers 
at Ricardo Consulting Engineers, a leading powertrain consultancy, 
dedicated to the design, testing and research of engines and 
transmissions, conducted in 1996-1997. The study investigated the 
degree to which these engineers use informal information sources, such 
as colleagues, and formal sources, such as their own and their 
departments' collections of notes and other literature, and Ricardo's 
Information Services Department (ISD), in particular its large textbase 
of engineering references, POWERLINK. Takes a humanist viewpoint to 
provide insights into the culture of a leading engineering company and 
the working lives of its engineers through a study of their need for 
and use of information, in relation to their biography, their cognitive 
style, and attitudes to work. A wide range of patterns of library use 
were revealed: ten respondents visited the library more than once a 
week; two claimed to be very frequent visitors; eight others claimed to 
use it about once a week; three said their visits followed no set 
patterns. The most popular reason for using the library was to consult 
the database but an objective test of six retrieval methods revealed a 
severe lack of understanding of basic retrieval techniques, which 
seemed to conflict with the general attitude of the engineers. 
Concludes by examining the values underlying the data, such as time, 
personality, information and communication, as a way of organizing the 
survey’s findings.
NO ID: 865
UL http://lis.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/33/4/168

RT Journal
ID 3636
A1 Weiler,Angela
T1 Two-Year College Freshmen and the Internet: Do they really "know all 
that stuff?"
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2001
VO 1
IS 2
SP 161
OP 167
AB Freshman English classes were surveyed to determine the students' 
computer experiences before coming to college. More than half the 
students surveyed had used the Internet once a week or less, and only 
about half had received any kind of computer training. These results 
are attributed to a variety of factors.
NO ID: 519

RT Book, Whole
ID 3638
A1 Weingand,Darlene E.
T1 Future-Driven Library Marketing
YR 1998
SP 189
NO ID: 335
PB American Library Association
PP Chicago
SN 0-8389-0735-0

RT Journal
ID 3637
A1 Weingand,Darlene E.
T1 Preparing for the New Millennium: The Case for Using Marketing 
Strategies
JF Library Trends
YR 1995
VO 43
IS 3
SP 295
OP 317
AB This is one of the articles in the issue that has a theme concerning 
marketing in libraries. Author Abstract - "The new millennium is 
approaching and libraries must develop creative problem-solving 
strategies if they are not only to survive but also to thrive. It is 
proposed that the former positive and comfortable attitude toward 
libraries no longer holds and that marketing must be added to the 
managerial toolbox."
NO ID: 334

RT Journal
ID 3639
A1 Welham,Robert
T1 Quality, at what price?
JF Chemistry in Britain
JO Chem.Br.
YR 1998
IS October
SP 40
OP 41
AB Can the rising cost of publishing the results of scientific research 
be brought under control? Robert Welham, the Royal Society of 
Chemistry's (RSC) director of Information services believes that if 
authors, societies and librarians collaborate, they can.
NO ID: 141

RT Journal
ID 3640
A1 Weller,Ann C.
T1 Editorial peer review for electronic journals: Current issues and 
emerging models
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science
YR 2000
VO 51
IS 14
SP 1328
OP 1333
AB This article reviews the evolution and growth of electronic 
journals, and describes the various emerging models of editorial peer 
review in an electronic environment. There is some debate about whether 
the traditional model of editorial peer review should be altered. 
Medicine, physics, and psychology are taking different approaches with 
editorial peer review in an electronic environment. This article 
summarizes several studies of peer review in an electronic environment. 
Studies to date have focused on attitudes toward electronic 
publications and citation patterns of electronic journals. Future 
trends and levels of acceptance of the new models are discussed.
NO ID: 212
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/75000074/START

RT Journal
ID 3642
A1 Wellman,Barry
T1 Three Ages of Internet Studies: Ten, Five and Zero Years Ago
JF New Media & Society
YR 2004
VO 6
IS 1
SP 123
OP 129
AB Yet, economic forces were already fueling the turn away from stand-
alone groupware towards applications that supported social networks. 
This was the proliferation of the internet as it became more than an 
academic chatroom. Unlike groupware, the internet was open-ended, far-
flung, and seemingly infinite in scope. The internet became dot.com-ed, 
and the boom was on by the mid-1990s. The internet was seen as a bright 
light, shining above everyday concerns. It was a technological marvel, 
thought to be bringing a new Enlightenment to transform the world.
NO ID: 601

RT Journal
ID 3641
A1 Wellman,Barry
T1 Computer Networks as Social Networks
JF Science
JO Science
YR 2001
VO 293
IS 5537
SP 2031
OP 2034
NO ID: 268

RT Book, Whole
ID 3643
A1 Wellman,Barry
A1 Heythornthwaite,Caroline
A1 Heythornthwaite,Caroline
T1 The Internet in Everyday Life
YR 2002
SP 588
AB Foreword: The Virtual Community in the Real World / Howard Rheingold 
Series Editor's Preface: The Internet and the Network Society / Manuel 
Castells Pt. I Moving the Internet out of Cyberspace: The Internet in 
Everyday Life: An Introduction / Caroline Haythornthwaite, Barry 
Wellman 3 Pt. II Place of the Internet in Everyday Life 1 Days and 
Nights on the Internet / Philip E. N. Howard, Lee Rainie, Steve Jones 
45 2 Global Villagers: Comparing Internet Users and Uses Around the 
World / Wenhong Chen, Jeffrey Boase, Barry Wellman 74 3 Syntopia: 
Access, Civic Involvement, and Social Interaction on the Net / James E. 
Katz, Ronald E. Rice 114 4 Digital Living: The Impact (or Otherwise) of 
the Internet on Everyday British Life / Ben Anderson, Karina Tracey 139 
5 Changing Digital Divide in Germany / Gert G. Wagner, Rainer Pischner, 
John P. Haisken-DeNew 164 6 Doing Social Science Research Online / Alan 
Neustadtl, John P. Robinson, Meyer Kestnbaum 186 Pt. III Finding Time 
for the Internet 7 Internet Use, Interpersonal Relations, and 
Sociability: A Time Diary Study / Norman H. Nie, D. Sunshine Hillygus, 
Lutz Erbring 215 8 Internet and Other Uses of Time / John P. Robinson, 
Meyer Kestnbaum, Alan Neustadtl, Anthony S. Alvarez 244 9 Everyday 
Communication Patterns of Heavy and Light Email Users / Janell I. 
Copher, Alaina G. Kanfer, Mary Bea Walker 263 Pt. IV Internet in the 
Community 10 Capitalizing on the Net: Social Contact, Civic Engagement, 
and Sense of Community / Anabel Quan-Haase, Barry Wellman, James C. 
Witte, Keith N. Hampton 291 11 Impact of Community Computer Networks on 
Social Capital and Community Involvement in Blacksburg / Andrea L. 
Kavanaugh, Scott J. Patterson 325 12 Not So Global Village of Netville 
/ Keith N. Hampton, Barry Wellman 345 13 Email, Gender, and Personal 
Relationships / Bonka Boneva, Robert Kraut 372 14 Belonging in 
Geographic, Ethnic, and Internet Spaces / Sorin Matei, Sandra J. Ball-
Rokeach 404 Pt. V Internet at School, Work, and Home 15 Bringing the 
Internet Home: Adult Distance Learners and Their Internet, Home, and 
Work Worlds / Caroline Haythornthwaite, Michelle M. Kazmer 431 16 Where 
Home is the Office: The New Form of Flexible Work / Janet W. Salaff 464 
17 Kerala Connections: Will the Internet Affect Science in Developing 
Areas? / Theresa Davidson, R. Sooryamoorthy, Wesley Shrum 496 18 Social 
Support for Japanese Mothers Online and Offline / Kakuko Miyata 520 19 
Experience and Trust in Online Shopping / Robert J. Lunn, Michael W. 
Suman 549
NO ID: 853
PB Blackwell PubWellman, Barry
PP Malden, MA
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/cHM851+.I58+2002

RT Journal
ID 3644
A1 Westbrook,Lynn
A1 Tucker,Steven A.
T1 Understanding faculty information needs: a process in the context of 
service
JF Reference & User Services Quarterly
YR 2002
VO 42
IS 2
SP 144
OP 148
AB Building major program revisions on the basis of an information 
needs analysis required members of an academic library staff to learn 
more about conducting in-house research. Working with administrative 
support, librarians crossed departmental boundaries to support the 
study, and then used the resulting data to begin redevelopment of a 
rapidly growing faculty service initiative.
NO ID: 499

RT Journal
ID 3647
A1 White,Herbert S.
T1 Librarians and Information Technology: which is the tail and which 
is the dog?
JF Library Trends
YR 1999
VO 48
IS 1
SP 264
OP 277
AB This article will argue, perhaps in contradiction to the discussions 
which precede it, that providing end users with more information does 
not really address their problems and, in fact, does not even identify 
them. Users want information in order to do other things, and this 
means that they must not only have the best information, but also not 
have it buried in quantities of other information which may be wrong 
but are more likely to be irrelevant and thereby misleading. Most 
importantly, our users need some assurance that what they found is the 
best that could be found. Dealing with these concerns does not require 
access to more information, it requires a process to sift the chaff 
from the wheat. Computer programs used by the end user cannot do this, 
but computer use by qualified information intermediaries on behalf of, 
and to protect, the end user can. This growth of specialists has been 
consistent for any field in which both complexity and options have 
increased, and the suggestion that computers can be programmed to do 
their own self-filtering effectively is at best naïve. Peter Drucker 
has predicted that the most important profession in the next century 
will be knowledge workers, and knowledge workers are not the same as 
computer systems specialists. The most competent ones are likely to be 
reference librarians using sophisticated hardware and software, tools 
which the end user does not know how to use.
NO ID: 824

RT Journal
ID 3648
A1 White,Herbert S.
T1 Librarians and information technology: which is the tail and which 
is the dog?
JF Library Trends
YR 1999
VO 48
IS 1
SP 264
OP 277
AB THIS ARTICLE WILL ARGUE, PERHAPS IN CONTRADICTION to the discussions 
which precede it, that providing end users with more information does 
not really address their problems and, in fact, does not even identify 
them. Users want information in order to do other things, and this 
means that they must not only have the best information, but also not 
have it buried in quantities of other information which may be wrong 
but are more likely to be irrelevant and thereby misleading. Most 
importantly, our users need some assurance that what they found is the 
best that could be found. Dealing with these concerns does not require 
access to more information, it requires a process to sift the chaff 
from the wheat. Computer programs used by the end user cannot do this, 
but computer use by qualified information intermediaries on behalf of, 
and to protect, the end user can. This growth of specialists has been 
consistent for any field in which both complexity and options have 
increased, and the suggestion that computers can be programmed to do 
their own self-filtering effectively is at best naive. Peter Drucker 
has predicted that the most important profession in the next century 
will be knowledge workers, and knowledge workers are not the same as 
computer systems specialists. The most competent ones are likely to be 
reference librarians using sophisticated hardware and software, tools 
which the end user does not know how to use.
NO ID: 848
UL http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1387/is_1_48/ai_57046536

RT Book, Section
ID 3645
A1 White,Howard D.
T1 Scientific Communication and Literature Retrieval
YR 1994
SP 41
OP 55
AB Describes how social scientists seek and use the literature.
NO ID: 458
A2 Cooper,Harris M.
A2 Hedges,Larry V.
T2 Handbook of Research Synthesis
PB Russell Sage Foundation
PP New York

RT Journal
ID 3646
A1 White,Howard D.
A1 Wellman,Barry
A1 Nazer,Nancy
T1 Does citation reflect social structure?: Longitudinal evidence from 
the Globenet interdisciplinary research group
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2004
VO 55
IS 2
SP 111
OP 126
AB Many authors have posited a social component in citation, the 
consensus being that the citers and citees often have interpersonal as 
well as intellectual ties. Evidence for this belief has been rather 
meager, however, in part because social networks researchers have 
lacked bibliometric data (e.g., pairwise citation counts from online 
databases), and citation analysts have lacked sociometric data (e.g., 
pairwise measures of acquaintanceship). In 1997 Nazer extensively 
measured personal relationships and communication behaviors in what we 
call Globenet, an international group of 16 researchers from seven 
disciplines that was established in 1993 to study human development. 
Since Globenet's membership is known, it was possible during 2002 to 
obtain citation records for all members in databases of the Institute 
for Scientific Information. This permitted examination of how members 
cited each other (intercited) in journal articles over the past three 
decades and in a 1999 book to which they all contributed. It was also 
possible to explore links between the intercitation data and the social 
and communication data. Using network-analytic techniques, we look at 
the growth of intercitation over time, the extent to which it follows 
disciplinary or interdisciplinary lines, whether it covaries with 
degrees of acquaintanceship, whether it reflects Globenet's 
organizational structure, whether it is associated with particular in-
group communication patterns, and whether it is related to the 
cocitation of Globenet members. Results show cocitation to be a 
powerful predictor of intercitation in the journal articles, while 
being an editor or coauthor is an important predictor in the book. 
Intellectual ties based on shared content did better as predictors than 
content-neutral social ties like friendship. However, interciters in 
Globenet communicated more than did noninterciters.
NO ID: 660
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/106565329/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3649
A1 White,Marilyn Domas
A1 Wang,Peiling
T1 A qualitative study of citing behavior: Contributions, criteria, and 
metalevel documentation concerns
JF Library Quarterly
YR 1997
VO 67
IS 2
SP 122
OP 154
AB Identifies factors in bibliographical citation decisions as 
agricultural researchers document their research activity. 
Contributions of the cited documents to researches; Criteria used by 
researchers in citing decisions divided into internal, self-related and 
external; Metalevel documentation concerns as guidelines applied 
flexibly to specific items and/or situations.
NO ID: 612
UL http://0-
search.epnet.com.bianca.penlib.du.edu:80/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&
an=9708136304

RT Journal
ID 3658
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 The Relationship between Undergraduates' Background Characteristics 
and College Experiences and their information-seeking behavior
JF Information Processing & Management
YR 2003
VO XXX
IS XXX
SP XXX
OP XXX
NO ID: 535

RT Journal
ID 3659
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 Epistemological beliefs and the information-seeking behavior of 
undergraduates
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2003
VO 25
IS 2
SP 127
OP 142
AB This study explores the relationship between undergraduates' 
epistemological beliefs and their information-seeking behavior. 
information search process (ISP) model and four models of 
epistemological development from educational psychology formed the 
theoretical foundation of this investigation. Twenty undergraduates 
attending an Ivy League university were interviewed about their search 
process as they completed a major research paper during their senior 
year. Epistemological beliefs affected topic, the use of mediators, 
search techniques, the evaluation of information, and the ability to 
recognize authority. Epistemological beliefs also affected several 
stages of the ISP model: topic selection, prefocus formulation, focus 
formulation, and collection. These findings provide a rich theoretical 
foundation for future information-seeking behavior research and will 
assist academic reference librarians by providing insights into the 
impact of undergraduates' epistemological beliefs on their information-
seeking behavior. [Copyright 2003 Elsevier]
NO ID: 536

RT Book, Section
ID 3660
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 What Do Faculty Need? Academic Library Resources and Services That 
Increase Research Productivity
YR 2003
AB This paper describes a theoretical model of the relationship between 
faculty research productivity and academic library resources and 
services and a proposed empirical study that will reveal which academic 
library resources and services contribute to increased faculty research 
productivity.
NO ID: 588
A2 Thompson,Hugh A.
T2 Learning to make a difference : proceedings of the Eleventh National 
Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, April 
10-13, 2003, Charlotte, North Carolina
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Chicago
UL http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlevents/whitmire.PDF

RT Journal
ID 3656
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 Disciplinary Differences and Undergraduates' Information-Seeking 
Behavior
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
FD Jun
VO 53
IS 8
SP 631
OP 638
K1 Academic Libraries
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Library Services
K1 Biglan Model
K1 Discipline
K1 Higher Education
K1 Library Research
K1 Questionnaires
K1 Research Needs
K1 Undergraduate Students
AB This study applied the Biglan model of disciplinary differences to 
the information-seeking behavior patterns of 5,175 undergraduates 
responding to questions on the College Student Experiences 
Questionnaire (CSEQ). The Biglan model categorizes academic disciplines 
along three dimensions: (1) hard-soft, (2) pure-applied, and (3) life-
nonlife systems. Using t-tests, this model proved to be valid for 
distinguishing differences in undergraduates' information-seeking 
behavior patterns among various academic disciplines. The results 
indicate that the Biglan model has implications for the redesign of 
academic library services and use as a valid theoretical framework for 
future library and information science research.
NO EJ647605; 3318-3324(200206)53:82.0.TX;2-9 English 3318-3324 Jun 2002 
631 200206 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR546006 CIJOCT2002 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 382
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/93012844/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3657
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 Academic library performance measures and undergraduates' library 
use and educational outcomes
JF Library & Information Science Research
YR 2002
VO 24
IS 2
SP 107
OP 128
AB This study investigated the relationship between an institution's 
academic library performance measures and undergraduates' library use 
and educational outcomes. The sample consisted of 7,958 undergraduates 
attending 36 colleges and universities representing four institutional 
types. Regression analyses determined the relationship between academic 
library performance measures and library use and self-reported gains in 
critical thinking while controlling for undergraduates' background 
characteristics and college experiences. Greater utilization of 
academic library services had a negative relationship with 
undergraduate library use at two institutional types. However, 
undergraduates attending research universities with greater academic 
library resources had higher self-reported gains in critical thinking. 
Regressions for the four institutional types explained 25% to 32% of 
the variance for library use and 22% to 27% of the variance for self-
reported gains in critical thinking. The results provide a better 
understanding of how academic library resources and services affect 
both library usage and educational outcomes. [Copyright 2002 Elsevier]
NO ID: 534

RT Journal
ID 3652
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 The relationship between undergraduates' background characteristics 
and college experiences and their academic library use
JF College and Research Libraries
YR 2001
FD November
VO 62
IS 6
SP 528
OP 540
AB Examines factors that influence undergraduates' academic library use 
during the first three years of college. Factors that predict library 
use; Relationship between undergraduate library use and self-reported 
and objective critical thinking scores'; Use of findings for the 
redesign of academic library services and future research studies on 
information-seeking behavior.
NO ID: 366

RT Journal
ID 3653
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 Factors Influencing Undergraduates' Self-Reported Satisfaction with 
Their Information Literacy Skills
JF portal: Libraries & the Academy
YR 2001
VO 1
IS 4
SP 409
OP 420
AB This study investigated factors influencing 643 undergraduates' 
self-reported satisfaction with their information literacy skills. 
Regression analysis revealed that students of color, students satisfied 
with campus library facilities, and students engaged in interactions 
with faculty reported greatest satisfaction with their progress. These 
results have implications for the redesign of academic library 
services.
NO ID: 518

RT Journal
ID 3654
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 A Longitudinal Study of Undergraduates' Academic Library Experiences
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 2001
VO 27
IS 5
SP 379
OP 385
AB Presents a study which examined the library use patterns of 
undergraduates during their first three years in college. Purpose of 
library use; Types of library services used by students; Use of 
mathematical techniques to evaluate the library activities of students.
NO ID: 533
UL http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0099-1333(01)00223-3

RT Dissertation/Thesis
ID 3655
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 The Influence of Academic Library Experiences on Undergraduates' 
Critical Thinking During Three Years of College
YR 2001
AB An academic library's quality has traditionally been determined by 
the size of its collections, expenditures, and operating budget. 
However, recent calls have suggested improving the evaluation of an 
academic library's quality by assessing its impact on student outcomes. 
This study tests a new model of academic library impact that takes into 
account the relationships between undergraduates' academic library 
experiences and critical thinking suggested by extant research. The 
conceptual framework was derived from four sets of literature: (1) 
literature on the relationship between undergraduates' library 
activities and critical thinking, (2) literature on undergraduates' 
library activities, (3) literature on background characteristics and 
college experiences that are related to undergraduates' critical 
thinking, and (4) literature on college impact theories and models. The 
two measures of critical thinking were self-reports on the College 
Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ) and objective scores on the 
Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) critical thinking 
test. These instruments were part of data obtained from the National 
Study of Student Learning (NSSL), a longitudinal, multi-institutional 
study sponsored by the National Center on Postsecondary Teaching, 
Learning and Assessment (NCTLA). Only data from the 1,046 
undergraduates who participated in all waves of the data collection 
were included in the secondary analyses. Results of regression analyses 
indicated that academic library experiences during the freshman and 
sophomore years were not related to either subjective or objective 
estimates of their critical thinking. Freshman and junior year academic 
library experiences were related to self-reported gains in critical 
thinking on the CSEQ during the junior year. While there was a 
relationship between self-reported critical thinking and academic 
library experiences, the significance levels were low. In addition to 
academic library experiences, other variables were related to self-
reported critical thinking. Outcomes attributed to peer interactions, 
writing term papers, active learning and engaged writing activities 
were directly and indirectly related to self-reported critical 
thinking. Student-faculty interactions were indirectly related to self-
reported critical thinking. Although this study provides evidence of a 
relationship between academic library experiences and self-reported 
critical thinking, future research is needed to explore the nature of 
undergraduates' library use and its relationship with other cognitive 
educational outcomes.
NO ID: 537
T2 Education
PB University of MichiganEditor
PP Ann Arbor, MI

RT Book, Section
ID 3651
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 Interpreting Undergraduates' Information-Seeking Behavior through 
Epistemological Development Theories
YR 2000
VO 37; 37
SP 126
OP 132
K1 Epistemology
K1 Information Seeking
K1 Search Behavior
K1 Cognitive Processes
K1 Higher Education
K1 Models
K1 Undergraduate Students
AB This pilot study tests a new model of undergraduates' information-
seeking behavior that incorporates the epistemological development 
theories of college students and suggests stages of cognitive processes 
that students undertake as they construct knowledge. Results suggest 
that students' stages of epistemological development directly impact 
their information-seeking behavior. (Contains 14 references.)
NO EJ618410; Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American 
Society for Information Science (ASIS) (63rd, Chicago, IL, November 12-
16, 2000).; ID: 384
T2 Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting

RT Journal
ID 3650
A1 Whitmire,Ethelene
T1 Racial Differences in the Academic Library Experiences of 
Undergraduates
JF Journal of Academic Librarianship
YR 1999
VO 25
IS 1
SP 33
OP 37
AB Presents information on a study which determined if the College 
Student Experiences Questionnaire (CSEQ) could validly measure the 
academic library experiences of undergraduates representing two 
different racial groups. Results indicate that African American 
undergraduate students used the academic library services and resources 
more frequently than White undergraduate students.
NO ID: 532

RT Book, Section
ID 3661
A1 Wible,Joseph G.
T1 Comparative analysis of citation studies, swept use, and ISI's 
impact factors as tools for journal deselection
YR 1989
SP 109
OP 116
AB The serials collection at Stanford's Falconer Biology Library was 
analyzed to identify $20,000 worth of titles to cut in 1989. Three 
methods were used to collect data. First, a citation analysis was done 
using al papers published over a two-year period by the library's 
primary clientele. Second, swept use data. Third, ISI impact factors.
NO ID: 419
A2 Burkhart,R. W.
T2 IAMSLIC at a crossroads - International Association of Marine 
Science Libraries and Information Centers. Conference (15th :1989 :St 
George's, Bermuda).
PB International Assn. of Marine Science Libs. & Information Centers

RT Journal
ID 3664
A1 Wiggins,Gary
T1 Teaching chemical literature, databases and chemical informatics
JF Committee on professional training (newsletter)
YR 2004
VO 4
IS 1 N2 -. The 2003 ACS guidelines document states that a well-prepared 
student should emerge from a program in chemistry with (among other 
things) "experience with computers, including an ability to use word 
processors, spreadsheets, numerical and(TRUNCATED)
SP 1
OP 2
NO ID: 792
UL 
http://www.chemistry.org/portal/resources/ACS/ACSContent/education/cpt/
nl_cpt_spring2004.pdf

RT Journal
ID 3662
A1 Wiggins,Gary
T1 Chemistry on the Internet: The library on your computer
JF Journal of chemical information and computer sciences
JO J.Chem.Inf.Comput.Sci.
YR 1998
VO 38
SP 956
OP 965
AB The Internet today has much to offer chemists and other scientists. 
A review of the major issues of the Internet and a look at future 
developments is presented. Special attention is given to electronic 
journals and the impact that they will have on the scholarly 
communication process.
NO ID: 155

RT Book, Section
ID 3663
A1 Wiggins,Gary
T1 New directions in the education of chemistry librarians and 
information specialists
YR 1998
SP 45
OP 58
NO Co-published simultaneously as Science & technology libraries, 
v17(2) 1998.; ID: 222
A2 Hallmark,Julie
A2 Seidman,Ruth K.
T2 Sci/tech librarianship : education and training
PB Haworth
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 3665
A1 Wilder,Stanley
T1 Information Literacy Makes All the Wrong Assumptions
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2005
FD January 7
VO 51
IS 18
SP B13
AB Academic librarians were quick to react to the threat posed by 
Internet competition. In 1989, half a dozen years before the first 
official release of Netscape, they recognized the explosion in 
networked information and proposed "information literacy," a 
reinvention of the educational function of the academic library. The 
premise of information literacy is that the supply of information has 
become overwhelming, and that students need a rigorous program of 
instruction in research or library-use skills, provided wholly or in 
part by librarians. A survey conducted by the Association of College 
and Research Libraries six years later found that 22 percent of U.S. 
academic libraries reported running some kind of information-literacy 
program, and in the years since, the idea has become the profession's 
accepted approach to its educational function.
NO ID: 559
UL http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v51/i18/18b01301.htm

RT Journal
ID 3667
A1 Wilder,Stanley J.
T1 A simple method for producing core scientific and technical journal 
title lists
JF Library Resources and Technical Services
YR 2000
VO 44
IS 2
SP 92
OP 96
AB Periodicals, Scientific and technical. Citation analysis.
NO ID: 412

RT Book, Whole
ID 3666
A1 Wilder,Stanley J.
T1 The age demographics of academic librarians : a profession apart : a 
report based on data from the ARL annual salary survey
YR 1995
AB College librarians -- Statistics. Age distribution (Demography) -- 
Statistics.
NO Z682.4.C63 W553 1995; ID: 805
PB Association of Research Libraries
PP Washington, DC
UL http://bianca.penlib.du.edu/search/i0918006775

RT Journal
ID 3668
A1 Wilkins,Janie L. Hassard
A1 Leckie,Gloria J.
T1 University professional and managerial staff: information needs and 
seeking
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1997
VO 58
IS v. '97have not read this yet.
SP 561
OP 574
K1 Surveys Information needs.
K1 Use studies College and university libraries
NO ID: 134

RT Book, Section
ID 3669
A1 Williams,Doris C.
T1 Using core journals to justify subscriptions and services
YR 1989
SP 123
OP 134
AB A list of core jourals was compiled from journal titles in which 60 
scientists from the Marne Science Research Center at SUNY-Stony Brook 
were published between 1984 and 1986. In addition, a list of titles 
cited by them in these papers was collection. These two lists are used 
to justify expenditures. A comparision is made with the ISI core 
journals in oceanography and marine biology.
NO ID: 420
A2 Burkhart,R. W.
T2 IAMSLIC at a crossroads - International Association of Marine 
Science Libraries and Information Centers. Conference (15th :1989 :St 
George's, Bermuda)
PB International Association of Marine Science Libraries and 
Information Centers

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3670
A1 Wilson,T.
A1 Whitelock,D.
T1 Colloquium for professional groups C5 (human-computer 
interaction)and C10 (consumer and domestic systems)
YR 1995
AB The pros and cons of using new technology in the presentation of a 
distance learning computer science course.
NO ID: 99
PB IEE

RT Journal
ID 3671
A1 Winston,Mark D.
T1 Academic Science and Engineering Librarians: A Research Study of 
Demographics, Educational Backgrounds, and Professional Activities
JF Science and Technology Libraries
YR 2001
VO 19
IS 2
SP 3
OP 24
AB This article presents the results of a research study of the 
population of academic science and engineering librarians whose job it 
is to provide information and research assistance in science and 
engineering related subject areas and to develop library collections to 
support research and teaching in those disciplines in colleges and 
universities. While librarians in these specialties play a major role 
in instructing those who conduct research and in developing the 
collections needed in order to complete this research in disciplines 
that offer particular challenges with regard to the demands of the 
researchers and the nature of the scholarly record in the disciplines, 
very little is known about the librarians who fulfill this crucial 
role. The results of this national study address an important segment 
of the academic library population, with a particular focus on 
educational and professional backgrounds, demographic characteristics, 
and professional and scholarly activities.
NO ID: 810
UL http://www.haworthpress.com/store/E-
Text/View_EText.asp?a=3&fn=J122v19n02_02&i=2&s=J122&v=19

RT Book, Whole
ID 3672
A1 Wolfe,Lisa A.
T1 Library Public Relations, Promotions, and Communications: A How-to-
do-it Manual
YR 1997
VO 75; 75
NO ID: 336
PB Neal-Schuman Publishers, Inc
PP New York
SN 155570266x

RT Conference Proceedings
ID 3673
A1 Wolpert,Ann J.
T1 Marketing Strategies: Lessons for Libraries From Commercial Brand 
Management
YR 1999
FD May 17- 21, 1999
AB She addresses how academic libraries can take advantage of our brand 
identity, and how these libraries can maintain an enviable brand 
position.
NO ID: 337
T2 IATUL Conference Proceedings - The Future of Libraries in Human 
Communication
PB IATUL
PP Technical University of Crete, Chania, Greece
UL http://www.iatul.org/conference/chanpap/wolpert.html

RT Journal
ID 3674
A1 Worlock,David R.
T1 The best and worst of times
JF Nature
JO Nature
YR 2001
VO 413
IS 6857
SP 671
NO ID: 263

RT Journal
ID 3675
A1 Worlock,Kate
T1 Open access and learned societies: Will open access prove a blessing 
or a curse to learned societies?
JF Nature (Web Focus)
YR 2004
FD March 25
AB Open Access has been acclaimed by many as the business model which 
will transform the scholarly publishing marketplace, rescuing libraries 
and academics from the 'evils' of commercial publishers. At present, 
most academic societies' publishing operations use the same business 
models as those commercial publishers. So will open access bring these 
learned societies real benefits or will it cause them financial 
hardship?
NO ID: 636
UL http://www.nature.com/nature/focus/accessdebate/8.html

RT Journal
ID 3676
A1 Wulf,Wm A.
T1 Look in the spaces for tomorrow's innovations
JF Communications of the ACM
JO Commun ACM
YR 1997
VO 40
IS 23 pages.
SP 109
OP 111
K1 Technological change
K1 Predictions
K1 Information technology
K1 Humanities
K1 Applications
K1 (9190) United States
K1 (1200) Social policy
K1 (5200) Communications & information management
AB It seems difficult to predict the way technology will be used, 
although it is easy to predict the technology itself. Predictions about 
the use of computer technology failed because they assumed that future 
uses of computers would be the same as the uses at the time the 
predictions were made. In order to make better and more accurate 
predictions, perhaps one should look at the spaces, as in oriental art. 
In other words, one should think of the current uses of computers and 
communications as objects on a landscape and the spaces in between as 
the interesting items. As in oriental art and gardens, the spaces 
between the objects define the relationships. One such space is 
humanistic scholarship. Information technology will have greater 
influence on scholarship in the humanities during the next 2 decades 
than on science and engineering. For example, historiography - the 
method of research in history - is enormously facilitated by 
technology.
NO ID: 102

RT Journal
ID 3677
A1 Wulff,Judith L.
A1 Nixon,Neal D.
T1 Quality markers and use of electronic journals in an academic health 
sciences library
JF Journal of the Medical Library Association
YR 2004
VO 92
IS 3
SP 315
OP 322
AB Objectives: Patterns of use of electronic versions of journals 
supplied by an academic health sciences library were examined to 
determine whether they differed from patterns of use among 
corresponding print titles and to relate the applicability of print 
collection development practices to an electronic environment. Methods: 
Use data supplied by three major vendors of electronic journals were 
compared to reshelving data for corresponding print titles, impact 
factors, and presence on Brandon/Hill Lists. Results: In collections 
where one-click access from a database record to the full text of 
articles was possible, electronic use correlated with print use across 
journal pairs. In both versions, Brandon/Hill titles were used more 
frequently than non-Brandon/Hill titles, use had modest correlations 
with journals' impact factors, and clinical use appeared to be higher 
than research use. Titles that had not been selected for the library's 
print collections, but which were bundled into publishers' packages, 
received little use compared to electronic titles also selected in 
print. Conclusions: Collection development practices based on quality 
and user needs can be applied with confidence to the electronic 
environment. Facilitating direct connections between citation databases 
and the corresponding journal articles regardless of platform or 
publisher will support scholarship and quality health care.
NO ID: 558
UL http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=442173

RT Journal
ID 3680
A1 Yocum,Patricia
T1 Electronic publishing in science: report of the expert meeting in 
Paris, 19-23 February 1996 sponsored by Unesco and the ICSU Press
JF IFLA Journal
YR 1996
VO 22
IS 3il. 0340-0352
SP 184
OP 190
K1 Unesco. International Council of Scientific Unions. Conferences 
France. Information systems Special subjects Science and technology. 
Electronic publishing
NO ID: 184

RT Journal
ID 3681
A1 Yocum,Patricia
T1 Libraries and the electronic journal in science
JF IFLA Journal
YR 1996
VO 22
IS 30340-0352
SP 181
OP 247
K1 Periodicals, Scientific and technical.
K1 Information systems Special subjectsScience and technology.
K1 Electronic journals
NO ID: 186

RT Journal
ID 3679
A1 Yocum,Patricia
T1 Challenge and change: some observations of academic science 
librarianship
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 1995
VO 15
IS 2Speech. 0194-262X
SP 17
OP 24
K1 Special Libraries Association.
K1 Science librarians Evaluation
AB Results of a California study of academic science and technology 
librarians can serve as an impetus for examining individual career 
history and comparison to the cohort. Attributes and skills associated 
with success are noted along with responsibilities individuals have in 
shaping their future professional environment.
NO ID: 183

RT Journal
ID 3678
A1 Yocum,Patricia
T1 The precarious state of academic science library collections
JF Science & Technology Libraries
YR 1989
VO 9
IS Spring0194-262X
SP 37
OP 46
K1 Scientific and technical libraries Finance.
K1 College and university libraries Finance
NO ID: 185

RT Newspaper Article
ID 3682
A1 Yoon,Carol Kaesuk
T1 Soaring prices spur a revolt in scientific publishing
JF New York Times
YR 1998
FD December 8
K1 sparc,
NO ID: 140
T2 New York Times
PP New York, New York

RT Journal
ID 3683
A1 Young,Jeffrey R.
T1 Scientific Publisher to Offer Search Engine for Article Abstracts
JF Chronicle of Higher Education
YR 2004
VO 50
IS 36
SP 36A
AB Elsevier, the largest publisher of scientific journals, recently 
began testing a subscription-based search engine of article abstracts 
from more than 14,000 scientific journals. About 50 colleges are 
participating in the test of the search tool, called Scopus. It 
searches journals from many publishers, and is expected to be widely 
available this fall. Company officials will not say how much the 
service will cost.
NO ID: 786
UL http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v50/i36/36a03601.htm

RT Journal
ID 3684
A1 Young,Nancy J.
A1 Von Seggern,Marilyn
T1 General Information Seeking in Changing Times
JF Reference and User Services Quarterly
YR 2001
VO 41
IS 2
SP 159
AB Provides information on a study which examined whether reference 
service in academic libraries is keeping pace with the modern forms of 
information seeking, access and delivery. Method and data analysis; 
Findings and conclusion.
NO ID: 371

RT Journal
ID 3685
A1 Young,Nancy J.
A1 Von Seggern,Marilyn
T1 General information seeking in changing times: a focus group study
JF Ref User Serv Q
YR 2001
FD Winter
VO 41
IS 2
SP 159
OP 169
K1 Descriptor: College and university libraries -- Reference services.
K1 Research and the library.
K1 Use studies -- Reference services
AB Focus groups of undergraduate students, graduate students, and 
faculty were asked about general information-seeking methods and how 
those had changed over the last three to five years. Questions about 
obstacles to finding information, criteria for good information 
sources, and a "perfect information source" were also explored with 
participants. Focus group sessions were recorded, transcribed, and 
loaded into the Ethnograph software program for textual data analysis. 
Seven prominent themes from the data and implications for assessment of 
reference service are discussed.
NO BLIB02001265 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1094-9054 Details: 
bibl f tab. article feature article; ID: 500

RT Journal
ID 3686
A1 Young,Peter R.
T1 Librarianship: a Changing Profession
JF Daedalus
JO Daedalus
YR 1996
VO 125
IS 4
SP 103
AB Recent information and telecommunications innovations seem to 
threaten the nature, values and practice of librarianship. However, 
practitioners must learn to view these as energizing motivations, and 
strive to combine their traditional role with being knowledge 
navigators and cyberspace organizers.
NO ID: 348

RT Book, Section
ID 3687
A1 Young,Virginia E.
T1 Can We Encourage Learning by Shaping Environment? Patterns of 
Seating Behavior in Undergraduates
YR 2003
AB When an undergraduate walks into the college library, where does she 
sit? What does he do? What determines if students study, plan for the 
weekend party or work in a group on a homework problem? Does the kind 
and placement of library furniture destine these behaviors? Is there a 
desired physical means to a learning end?
NO ID: 586
A2 Thompson,Hugh A.
T2 Learning to make a difference : proceedings of the Eleventh National 
Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries, April 
10-13, 2003, Charlotte, North Carolina
PB Association of College and Research Libraries
PP Chicago
UL http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlevents/young.PDF

RT Journal
ID 3688
A1 Youngen,Gregory K.
T1 Citation patterns to traditional and electronic preprints in the 
published literature
JF College & Research Libraries
YR 1998
FD September
VO 59
IS 5
SP 448
OP 456
K1 Physics and astronomy preprints, e-prints, eprints, Los Alamos 
National Laboratory, LANL, SLAC, Stanford Linear Accelerator 
Laboratory, citations, xxx.lanl.gov, preprint, eprint
AB This paper identifies the growing importance of electronic preprints 
in the published literature and addresses several areas of concern 
regarding the future role of electronic preprints in scientific 
communication.
NO ID: 145

RT Book, Section
ID 3690
A1 Youngen,Gregory K.
A1 Davidoff,Gary
T1 Incorporating the Internet into science and technology reference 
instruction
YR 1998
SP 23
OP 30
NO co-published simultaneously as Science & technology libraries, 
v17(2) 1998.; ID: 220
A2 Hallmark,Julie
A2 Seidman,Ruth K.
T2 Sci/tech librarianship : education and training
PB Haworth
PP New York, NY

RT Journal
ID 3689
A1 Youngen,Gregory Keith
T1 The impact of electronic publishing on scholarly communication: a 
forum on the future--a conference report. October 2000, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
JF Libr Collect Acquis Tech Serv
YR 2001
FD Summer
VO 25
IS 2
SP 211
OP 222
K1 Descriptor: Conferences -- Illinois.
K1 Electronic publishing.
K1 Scholarly publishing
NO BLIB01007394 Provider: OCLC; United States ISSN: 1464-9055 article 
feature article; ID: 482

RT Journal
ID 3691
A1 Youngman,Daryl C.
T1 Changing roles for science & technology librarians as reflected in 
the history of Engineering index
JF Issues in Science & Technology Librarianship
YR 1998
IS Springbibl. 1092-1206 LIBRARIES: STATE: AZ LIBRARY: AZU (UNIV OF 
ARIZONA) STATE: CA LIBRARY: CUS (UNIV OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO) CUT 
(UNIV OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA) STATE: DC LIBRARY: GWM (GEORGE 
WASHINGTON UNIV, MED CTR) STATE: DE LIBRARY: (TRUNCATED)
K1 Science librarians History.
K1 Indexes and abstracts History
AB Examines how the practice of user services in science and technology 
has changed over a century. While the goal of excellence in information 
service has remained a constant, the nature of the tools and the role 
of the librarian has changed markedly.
NO ID: 137

RT Journal
ID 3692
A1 Yu,Byeong-Min
A1 Roh,Seak-Zoon
T1 The effects of menu design on information-seeking performance and 
user's attitude on the world wide web
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2002
VO 53
IS 11
SP 923
OP 933
AB As the Web becomes more popular, the interest in effective 
navigation is increasing. Menu design is becoming a central issue of 
human computer interface design as the focus of computer applications 
moves from the computer as a machine to the human as a user. The 
purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of three different 
Web menu designs (a simple selection menu, a global and local 
navigation menu, and a pull-down menu) on users' information-seeking 
performance and attitudes. Three Cyber-shopping mall Web sites were 
developed for the experiment. These Web sites had the same content and 
a constant information structure, but each had a different menu design. 
The results showed different effect of menu design on both searching 
performance and browsing performance. More specifically, participants' 
searching performance was superior in the pull-down menu condition 
compared to the global and local navigation menu and the simple 
selection menu conditions. Browsing task performance was the fastest 
with the global and local navigation menu. However, there were no 
significant differences among three menu designs in terms of users' 
perception on appeal of the Web site and disorientation.
NO ID: 702
UL http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-
bin/abstract/96516670/ABSTRACT

RT Journal
ID 3696
A1 Zhang,Yin
T1 Scholarly Use of Internet-based Electronic Resources
JF Journal of the American Society for Information Science and 
Technology
JO J.Am.Soc.Inf.Sci.Technol.
YR 2001
FD Jun
VO 52
IS 8
SP 628
OP 654
K1 Information Scientists
K1 Information Utilization
K1 Internet
K1 Research Methodology
K1 Electronic Resources
K1 Citations (References)
K1 Longitudinal Studies
K1 Problems
K1 Questionnaires
K1 Surveys
AB Examines the use of Internet-based electronic resources by library 
and information science scholars, focusing particularly on how scholars 
use, cite, and evaluate electronic resources during the research 
process. Discusses results of longitudinal analyses and surveys that 
address problems and concerns of scholars. A copy of the survey 
questionnaire is appended. (Contains 105 references.) (Author/LRW)
NO EJ629858; 3318-3324(200106)52:82.0.TX;2-W English 3318-3324 Jun 2001 
628 200106 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR544132 CIJJAN2002 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 399

RT Journal
ID 3695
A1 Zhang,Yin
T1 Exploring Factors Affecting LIS Scholars' Use of Internet-based 
Resources
JF Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting
YR 2000
VO v37 p39-46 2000
K1 Information Scientists
K1 Internet
K1 Users (Information)
K1 Electronic Resources
K1 Frequency Analysis
K1 Predictor Variables
K1 Self Concept
K1 Surveys
K1 Use Studies
AB Explores factors that affect how frequently scholars use Internet-
based electronic resources based on a survey of library and information 
science (LIS) researchers. Results show that the number of access 
points and self-perceived overall ability to use the Internet are the 
two significant variables affecting frequency of use of electronic 
resources. (Contains 32 references.) (Author/LRW)
NO EJ618398; 0160-0044(2000)372.0.TX;2-3 Paper presented at the Annual 
Meeting of the American Society for Information Science (ASIS) (63rd, 
Chicago, IL, November 12-16, 2000). English 0160-0044 2000 39 2000 
Journal Article (CIJE) a IR543079 CIJJUN2001 080 Journal Articles 143 
Reports--Research; ID: 400

RT Journal
ID 3694
A1 Zhang,Yin
T1 Scholarly Use of Internet-Based Electronic Resources: A Survey 
Report
JF Library Trends
YR 1999
FD Spr
VO 47
IS 4
SP 746
OP 770
K1 Information Scientists
K1 Information Sources
K1 Internet
K1 Librarians
K1 Library Science
K1 Scholarly Writing
K1 Computer Attitudes
K1 Electronic Text
K1 Nonprint Media
K1 Professional Personnel
K1 Reference Materials
K1 Research
K1 Researchers
K1 Scholarship
AB Reports on a study to construct a baseline of scholarly use of 
Internet-based electronic resources (e-sources) by surveying library 
and information science (LIS) scholars. Results reported include 
researchers' demographic information, frequency of use of various 
applications, strategies of locating e-sources for research, opinions 
on citing e-sources, evaluation, and suggestions for improving 
scholars' use of e-sources for research. (Author/AEF)
NO EJ591555; 0024-2594(199921)47:42.0.TX;2-N Theme issue topic: Human 
Response to Library Technology. English 0024-2594 Spr 1999 746 19990398 
Journal Article (CIJE) a IR540159 CIJMAR2000 080 Journal Articles 143 
Reports--Research; ID: 401

RT Journal
ID 3693
A1 Zhang,Yin
T1 The Impact of Internet-Based Electronic Resources on Formal 
Scholarly Communication in the Area of Library and Information Science: 
A Citation Analysis
JF Journal of Information Science
JO J.Inf.Sci.
YR 1998
FD 1998
VO 24
IS 4
SP 241
OP 254
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Citations (References)
K1 Information Sources
K1 Information Technology
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Electronic Resources
K1 Case Studies
K1 Information Science
K1 Internet
K1 Nonprint Media
K1 Periodicals
K1 Printed Materials
K1 Writing for Publication
AB Investigates how much electronic resources (e-sources) have been 
used in formal scholarly communication, using a case study in library 
and information science during 1994-96. Four citation-based indicators 
are used for the impact measurement. Compared with the impact of print 
sources, the impact of e-sources is small. Findings suggest e-source 
citation may depend on authors rather than the journal format. 
(Author/AEF)
NO EJ573941; 0165-5515(1998)24:42.0.TX;2-F English 0165-5515 1998 241 
1998 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR538434 CIJJUN1999 080 Journal Articles 
143 Reports--Research; ID: 403

RT Journal
ID 3697
A1 Zhang,Yin
A1 Estabrook,Leigh
T1 Accessibility to Internet-based Electronic Resources and its 
Implications for Electronic Scholarship
JF Proceedings of the ASIS Annual Meeting
YR 1998
VO 35
SP 463
OP 473
K1 Access to Information
K1 Citations (References)
K1 Electronic Journals
K1 Information Sources
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Editors
K1 Electronic Publishing
K1 Information Policy
K1 Internet
K1 Periodicals
K1 Printed Materials
K1 Surveys
AB Explores the accessibility of Internet-based electronic resources 
(e-sources) through three efforts: (1) evaluation of accessibility of 
e-sources cited in four print journals and four electronic journals in 
library and information science, (2) a survey of editors regarding 
policies on citing e-sources, and (3) a survey of authors on accessing 
of e-sources. (Author/AEF)
NO EJ575888; 0044-7870(1998)352.0.TX;2-U Paper presented at the ASIS 
Annual Meeting (61st, Pittsburgh, PA, October 25-29, 1998). English 
0044-7870 1998 463 1998 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR538838 CIJJUL1999 
080 Journal Articles 142 Reports--Evaluative 150 Speeches/Meeting 
Papers; ID: 402

RT Journal
ID 3700
A1 Zipp,Louise S.
T1 Core Serial Titles in an Interdisciplinary Field: The Case of 
Environmental Geology
JF Library Resources & Technical Services
JO Libr.Resour.Tech.Serv.
YR 1999
FD Jan
VO 43
IS 1
SP 28
OP 36
K1 Citation Analysis
K1 Environmental Research
K1 Periodicals
K1 Scholarly Journals
K1 Environmental Geology
K1 Engineering
K1 Geochemistry
K1 Geology
K1 Information Sources
K1 Library Collection Development
K1 Library Materials
K1 Physical Environment
AB Identifies core journals in environmental geology and explores 
facets of interdisciplinarity to consider the visibility of this field 
to collection-development librarians. Intercitation analysis of citing 
and cited patterns in 1995 articles revealed the journal network of 
environmental geology. Titles clustered into three categories: 
Engineering/Materials; Geochemical; and Water/Soil. (Author/AEF)
NO EJ586305; 0024-2527(199901)43:12.0.TX;2-2 English 0024-2527 Jan 1999 
28 199901 Journal Article (CIJE) a IR539615 CIJDEC1999 080 Journal 
Articles 143 Reports--Research; ID: 421

RT Journal
ID 3699
A1 Zipp,Louise S.
T1 Thesis and dissertation citations as indicators of faculty research 
use of university library journal collections. Using four studies in 
geology and biology
JF Library Resources & Technical Services
JO Libr.Resour.Tech.Serv.
YR 1996
VO 40
IS October
SP 335
OP 342
K1 Use studies -- Serial publications. serials
K1 College and university libraries -- Serial publications.
K1 Periodicals, journals Geology.
K1 Biological, biology.
K1 Citation analysis. citations
K1 Academic dissertations
NO ID: 194

RT Book, Section
ID 3698
A1 Zipp,Louise S.
T1 Identifying core geologic research journals: a model for 
interlibrary cooperative collection development
YR 1995
SP 59
OP 65
AB Cooperation -- Collection development. College and university 
libraries -- Serial publications. Periodicals, Geology. Iowa.
NO ID: 422
A2 Haner,Barbara E.
A2 O'Donnell,Jim
T2 Changing gateways: the impact of technology on geoscience 
information exchange - Geoscience Information Society. Meeting (29th 
:1994 :Seattle, Wash.)
PB Geoscience Information Society