Welcome to the Virtual Tour
of the University of Denver's historic
Chamberlin Observatory (c)

Obs. Park, 2930 E. Warren Ave., Denver SE, Colorado
Latest GPS: W104d 57'10.8", N39d 40'33.8", elev. 5417 ft., obscode 708.
MAP * Blog

The south elevation of the University of Denver's historic Chamberlin Observatory, as seen from approximately 60 feet from the main door. Note the Richardson Romanesque style of this 1890 construction, featuring a 26 foot length, 20-inch aperture, f/15 Alvan Clark-George Saegmuller refractor.

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Announcing the 2014-2015 fundraising effort: 

An endowment fund for Chamberlin Observatory permanent staffing

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See the moon and planets, most TUES and THURS evenings, 7:30pm MST/winter; 8:30pm MDT/summer...
...if/when clear: PUBLIC_NIGHT_RESERVATIONS link

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Special First Quarter Moon SATURDAYS, Dusk - 10:30pm, including
:
2014: Jun.7, Jul.19*Aug.2, Sep.27, Nov.1st & Dec.27.

*7/19/14 = 120th anniversary of 'first light'

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 Link to: www.twitter.com/Chamberlin_Obs 

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Click here for more forthcoming events in the Sky 

Got an astronomy question? Click here.
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OBSERVATORY GUIDEBOOK -
Denver's Great Telescope -

now available

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Second State Historic Fund grant awarded, renovations completed 2008!

Optics and mechanical refurbishments completed 2010, 2011 with help and support from 

Chris Ray and Fred Orthlieb (ATS)


The Observatory is located in Observatory Park in SE Denver, at 2930 East Warren Avenue. Major intersections nearby include So. University (exit 205 south I-25) and E. Evans Avenues. Call 303-871-5172 for pre-recorded information.

~ Quarter moon Saturday evening Open Houses ~
( 7-10pm, weather permitting):

First quarter moon Saturdays
Sunset til ~10pm, weather permitting.
Phone 303-871-5172 for details.

Our once-a-month first quarter moon Saturday evening Open House events, weather permitting runs from ~7pm til ~10pm, weather permitting. Observing with the large telescope is $1 per person to help offset cost of maintenance, and the astronomy club brings numerous portable telescopes which are set up in the park, with free for all viewing. This provides the public great sky access and a chance to talk with owners of equipment about what advantages and disadvantages there are to different types of small telescopes. The Observatory is located in Observatory Park in SE Denver, at 2930 East Warren Avenue. Major intersections nearby include So. University (exit 205 south I-25) and E. Evans Avenues.

PUBLIC_NIGHT_RESERVATIONS link

Additional scheduling policies link


Chamberlin Observatory, completed in 1894 is unique among Denver landmarks. DU's first astronomy professor, Professor Herbert Howe, designed it after Carleton College Goodsell Observatory in Northfield Minnesota. The original construction drawings by noted Denver architect, Robert Roeschlaub, are held in the University archives collection, Penrose Library on the DU campus.
The dome houses a 20 inch aperture Clark-Saegmuller refractor, which saw first light in July 1894, and is still "functional". Regular classes and public viewing still occur. The original description of Chamberlin Observatory and its large refractor appear in an article by Prof. Herbert A. Howe that appears in the 1894 Astronomy & Astrophysics (a precursor to the Astrophysical Journal), volume 8, page 709ff. Limited edition histories of the observatory are available [click here]. We honor the past and strive to create hope for the future with every student that peers through the telescope's eyepiece.

Astronomy at the University of Denver has remained continuously active since 1880, in the pursuit of research, teaching and community outreach. Please visit our HOME PAGES for more information, or EMAIL: rstencel @ du.edu -- Prof. Stencel, Director, University of Denver Observatories.


Forthcoming EVENTS in the Sky
The definitive history is now available in print! 
Secrist (1953) Chamberlin Memoirs Available Now
Items from Recent Newsletters
The metro Denver battle for darker skies

The truth about Star Naming

Observing Variable Stars: Training Program
Mercury Transit, 11/15/99

Total Lunar Eclipse, 10/27/04

Learn more about Historic Denver Inc.

Virtual Tours of Famous Observatories


Astronomy at the University of Denver has remained continuously active since 1880, in the pursuit of research, teaching and community outreach.
Please visit our HOME PAGES for more information, or EMAIL: rstencel @ du.edu -- Prof. Stencel, Director, University of Denver Observatories.
The original description of Chamberlin Observatory and its large refractor appear in an article by Prof. Herbert A. Howe that appears in the 1894 Astronomy & Astrophysics (a precursor to the Astrophysical Journal), volume 8, page 709ff.


This website sponsored in part by the Geise Family Foundation, the Young First Foundation & the William Marlar Foundation.


Please phone 303-871-5172 for the current public night schedule, and info about the

DENVER ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY.
For daytime astronomy, please visit GATES PLANETARIUM
Call 303-871-2135 for information regarding
DU ASTRONOMY CLASSES.


BEGIN TOUR

 

39 more images, plus historical narrative!

Or, take shortcuts to:

Chamberlin's namesake.

The 20 inch Clark refractor.

The Meridian Circle/Library.

The Student Observatory, aka 'Van Nattan' or 'Robo-scope'.


Telescope images *RIGHT CLICK TO VIEW*
(left: Dan Wray, 1997; right DU Archives)
Pages assembled by Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver. Images were acquired with a Chinon ES-3000 digital camera, using 320 x 240 resolution, courtesy DU Audio-Visual Services. (c) 1996-present.

ASTRONOMY QUESTIONS? Visit the STAR GUYS!

For daytime astronomy, visit GATES PLANETARIUM

Need a star map?

Link to MT.EVANS MEYER-WOMBLE OBSERVATORY NEWS.

Return to DU Astronomy Homepage

Return to DU Physics & Astronomy Homepage


Contact rstencel @ du.edu = Prof. Stencel with questions. Visit the DU Observatories: Chamberlin and Mt.Evans.

Keywords: astron, astrophys, astronomy, astrophysics, observatory, telescope, skywatching, stars, planets, comets, UFO, observing, constellations, space, and more...

Join the Friends of Chamberlin Observatory


Can we observe tonight?

http://cleardarksky.com/csk/getcsk.php?id=ChmrlObCO


For more updates see the Alt.homepage.